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The following was part of an online test but its been removed now so Im hoping its ok to post here. I am struggling with the answer so I thought I ask the smart people on StackOverflow. Any language is fine!

Given an array A of N integers we draw N discs in a 2D plane, such that i-th disc has center in (0,i) and a radius A[i]. We say that k-th disc and j-th disc intersect, if

and k-th and j-th discs have at least one common point.

Write a function

int number_of_disc_intersections(int[] A);

which given an array A describing N discs as explained above, returns the number of pairs of intersecting discs. For example, given N=6 and

A[0] = 1
A[1] = 5
A[2] = 2
A[3] = 1
A[4] = 4
A[5] = 0

there are 11 pairs of intersecting discs: 0th and 1st 0th and 2nd 0th and 4th 1st and 2nd 1st and 3rd 1st and 4th 1st and 5th 2nd and 3rd 2nd and 4th 3rd and 4th 4th and 5th

so the function should return 11. The function should return -1 if the number of intersecting pairs exceeds 10,000,000. The function may assume that N does not exceed 10,000,000.

Anyone able to help me out with this please?

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1  
Is it a requirement for the algorithm to be efficient? That's it, any specicif BigOh? An O(n**2) solution comes to my mind. –  vz0 Jan 26 '11 at 3:50
2  
@vz0 N does not exceed 10,000,000 –  Nikita Rybak Jan 26 '11 at 3:53
    
@vz0 yes needs to be efficient as counts towards total mark –  user590076 Jan 26 '11 at 3:57
3  
For anyone who wants to give this challenge a go, it's one of the Codility demo challenges: Number of Disc Intersections. They have a few others in this blog post. –  Defragged Jul 16 '12 at 21:55
1  
How are the 0th and 1st circles intersecting? Does common point mean there's overlap of any kind (like circle inside a circle) or or does it mean their lines touch? –  dlp Aug 20 '13 at 19:57

19 Answers 19

up vote 43 down vote accepted

So you want to find the number of intersections of the intervals [i-A[i], i+A[i]].

Maintain a sorted array (call it X) containing the i-A[i] (also have some extra space which has the value i+A[i] in there).

Now walk the array X, starting at the leftmost interval (i.e smallest i-A[i]).

For the current interval, do a binary search to see where the right end point of the interval (i.e. i+A[i]) will go (called the rank). Now you know that it intersects all the elements to the left.

Increment a counter with the rank and subtract current position (assuming one indexed) as we don't want to double count intervals and self intersections.

O(nlogn) time, O(n) space.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good explanation, in simple terms. –  Nikita Rybak Jan 26 '11 at 3:58
1  
@Moron- Is it possible for this to run in O(n lg n)? Can't there be O(n^2) intersections? –  templatetypedef Jan 26 '11 at 4:21
    
@template: No. We increment the counter O(n) times at most. –  Aryabhatta Jan 26 '11 at 4:24
3  
@Moron- Ah, because you don't need to return the actual intersections, just the number. I see. –  templatetypedef Jan 26 '11 at 4:24
1  
@jscoot: Disagree. Sorting is one of the basic steps in many algorithms. You better have one handy. In fact quicksort will probably be good enough for this. –  Aryabhatta May 7 '11 at 15:47

O(N) complexity and O(N) memory solution.

private static int Intersections(int[] a)
{
    int result = 0;
    int[] dps = new int[a.Length];
    int[] dpe = new int[a.Length];

    for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
    {
        dps[Math.Max(0, i - a[i])]++;
        dpe[Math.Min(a.Length - 1, i + a[i])]++;
    }

    int t = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < a.Length; i++)
    {
        if (dps[i] > 0)
        {
            result += t * dps[i];
            result += dps[i] * (dps[i] - 1) / 2;
            t += dps[i];
        }
        t -= dpe[i];
    }

    return result;
}
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1  
Your solution is blazingly fast. Could you explain it? I changed your code, so that it received 100% (see below). –  adam.cajf Oct 19 '13 at 21:32
1  
This is easy. Intiially we calculate all start and end points of discs. After go by all line and check count of discs inside current point. If in current point started some discs and intersection count increased by: already active distsc multiplied by count of started in current point (result += t * dps[i]) and count of intersections of started(result += dps[i] * (dps[i] - 1) / 2) eg. if started 5 discs in one of point it will increased by(1+2+3+4+5 intersections, or 5*(5-1) / 2[sum formula]). –  Толя Oct 23 '13 at 6:34
1  
What a brilliant solution! This should be the correct (more correct :)) answer. Just to add a bit more explanation to what Tolia has. Basically, we are keeping track of the current "active" disks at each location. This is the value of t. Whenever a new disk starts at location i, it intersects with all existing disks at that location. That's why we have result += t * dps[i]. We also need to add the number of intersections for all the disks that just started at location i, i.e., the number of intersections within themselves excluding whatever already existed(result += dps[i] * (dps[i] - 1) / 2) –  Abdul Oct 20 at 0:01

Well, I adapted Falk Hüffner's idea to c++, and made a change in the range. Opposite to what is written above, there is no need to go beyond the scope of the array (no matter how large are the values in it). On Codility this code received 100%. Thank you Falk for your great idea!

int number_of_disc_intersections ( const vector<int> &A ) {
    int sum=0;
    vector<int> start(A.size(),0);
    vector<int> end(A.size(),0);
    for (unsigned int i=0;i<A.size();i++){
        if ((int)i<A[i]) start[0]++;
        else        start[i-A[i]]++;
        if (i+A[i]>=A.size())   end[A.size()-1]++;
        else                    end[i+A[i]]++;
    }
    int active=0;
    for (unsigned int i=0;i<A.size();i++){
        sum+=active*start[i]+(start[i]*(start[i]-1))/2;
        if (sum>10000000) return -1;
        active+=start[i]-end[i];
    }
    return sum;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
can reduce(visible) conditionals, to make more readable. start[Max(0,i-a[i])]++; end[Min(a.Size()-1,i+a[i])]++; –  richard Nov 15 '11 at 14:06
    
very nice solution! –  Zadirion May 25 '13 at 9:00
    
Commented code and/or a general explanation of strategy would improve this answer. –  Richard Feb 17 at 4:18

This can even be done in linear time. In fact, it becomes easier if you ignore the fact that there is exactly one interval centered at each point, and just treat it as a set of start- and endpoints of intervals. You can then just scan it from the left (Python code for simplicity):

from collections import defaultdict

a = [1, 5, 2, 1, 4, 0]

start = defaultdict(int)
stop = defaultdict(int)

for i in range(len(a)):
    start[i - a[i]] += 1
    stop[i + a[i]] += 1

active = 0
intersections = 0
for i in range(-len(a), len(a)):
    intersections += active * start[i] + (start[i] * (start[i] - 1)) / 2    
    active += start[i]
    active -= stop[i]

print intersections
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1  
This isn't quite right. Your iteration needs to go from min(start) to max(stop) to be correct, which is potentially exponential in the input size. Instead you can sort start and stop and iterate through them sparsely, but that's O(n lg n). –  Keith Randall Jan 27 '11 at 16:45
    
Right, I missed that. Indeed, the extra log n factor seems unavoidable with any scanning approach. –  Falk Hüffner Jan 27 '11 at 18:27
    
can you explain why is + (start[i] * (start[i] - 1)) / 2 part required while counting intersections? –  Bunny Rabbit Jan 15 '12 at 13:42
    
If you have several circles that all start at the same place, you need to consider their intersections among each other. For instance, if 3 circles start at the same place, 1 intersects 2, 1 intersects 3, and 2 intersects 3. For N circles starting together, there are "N choose 2" intersections among them. This is "N * (N-1) / 2". –  user691307 Apr 23 '12 at 19:20
    
You solution fails into fillowing test case: a = [1, 55, 2, 1, 4, 0] –  Толя Oct 23 '13 at 6:37

I got 100 out of 100 with this C++ implementation:

#include <map>
#include <algorithm>

inline bool mySortFunction(pair<int,int> p1, pair<int,int> p2)
{
    return ( p1.first < p2.first );
}

int number_of_disc_intersections ( const vector<int> &A ) {
    int i, size = A.size();
    if ( size <= 1 ) return 0;
    // Compute lower boundary of all discs and sort them in ascending order
    vector< pair<int,int> > lowBounds(size);
    for(i=0; i<size; i++) lowBounds[i] = pair<int,int>(i-A[i],i+A[i]);
    sort(lowBounds.begin(), lowBounds.end(), mySortFunction);
    // Browse discs
    int nbIntersect = 0;
    for(i=0; i<size; i++)
    {
        int curBound = lowBounds[i].second;
        for(int j=i+1; j<size && lowBounds[j].first<=curBound; j++)
        {
            nbIntersect++;
            // Maximal number of intersections
            if ( nbIntersect > 10000000 ) return -1;
        }
    }
    return nbIntersect;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I tried your solution and the score was 87 I changed it a little to arrive to 93 but unluckly I don't pass onl one test. Hoewever you had a great idea and it's easy to understand! –  Sergio Aug 20 '13 at 19:42
    
Got 93% while running this code. Did not understand why the worst case would not be O(N^2) here, considering there are 2 for loops and an array of 100k ints with the value of 2 billion. –  Raul Mar 11 at 21:37
    
Also did not understand the point of sorting by lower bound, although it seems to be working. Could you explain? Thanks –  Raul Mar 11 at 21:39

A Python answer

from bisect import bisect_right

def number_of_disc_intersections(li):
    pairs = 0
    # treat as a series of intervals on the y axis at x=0
    intervals = sorted( [(i-li[i], i+li[i]) for i in range(len(li))] )
    # do this by creating a list of start points of each interval
    starts = [i[0] for i in intervals]
    for i in range(len(starts)):
        # find the index of the rightmost value less than or equal to the interval-end
        count = bisect_right(starts, intervals[i][1])
        # subtract current position to exclude previous matches, and subtract self
        count -= (i+1)
        pairs += count
        if pairs > 10000000:
            return -1
    return pairs
share|improve this answer
    
Can you give us a short explanation? Is it different than the accepted answer? –  Austin Henley Oct 5 '12 at 14:50
count = 0
for (int i = 0; i < N; i++) {
  for (int j = i+1; j < N; j++) {
    if (i + A[i] >= j - A[j]) count++;
  }
}

It is O(N^2) so pretty slow, but it works.

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3  
Problem description has very specific constraints for n - 10^7. I wouldn't call it 'works', if it can't finish computations within a month :) –  Nikita Rybak Jan 26 '11 at 3:59
    
Just for completeness: you have to sort the array first if you want this to work. –  TonyK Jan 26 '11 at 10:14
3  
Question was in how to solve faster, than O(N^2)? –  Nakilon Jan 26 '11 at 11:24
    
@TonyK - General question. If one sorts the array, then this logic wont work. So what is the logic if one sorts the array first, because then one is losing the mapping between index and radii of the discs, both of which are needed in deciding the intersection happens or not. So how to do then in case array is sorted? –  goldenmean Jan 29 '12 at 15:06

This got 100/100 in c#

class CodilityDemo3
{

    public static int GetIntersections(int[] A)
    {
        if (A == null)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        int size = A.Length;

        if (size <= 1)
        {
            return 0;
        }

        List<Line> lines = new List<Line>();

        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            if (A[i] >= 0)
            {
                lines.Add(new Line(i - A[i], i + A[i]));
            }
        }

        lines.Sort(Line.CompareLines);
        size = lines.Count;
        int intersects = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
        {
            Line ln1 = lines[i];
            for (int j = i + 1; j < size; j++)
            {
                Line ln2 = lines[j];
                if (ln2.YStart <= ln1.YEnd)
                {
                    intersects += 1;
                    if (intersects > 10000000)
                    {
                        return -1;
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    break;
                }
            }
        }

        return intersects;
    }

}

public class Line
{
    public Line(double ystart, double yend)
    {
        YStart = ystart;
        YEnd = yend;
    }
    public double YStart { get; set; }
    public double YEnd { get; set; }

    public static int CompareLines(Line line1, Line line2)
    {
        return (line1.YStart.CompareTo(line2.YStart));

    }
}

}

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4  
This is O(N^2) and scored 95% on Codility as got a timeout on one test. –  richard Nov 15 '11 at 13:31

Thanks to Falk for the great idea! Here is a ruby implementation that takes advantage of sparseness.

def int(a)

    event = Hash.new{|h,k| h[k] = {:start => 0, :stop => 0}}
    a.each_index {|i|
        event[i - a[i]][:start] += 1
        event[i + a[i]][:stop ] += 1
    }
    sorted_events = (event.sort_by {|index, value| index}).map! {|n| n[1]}

    past_start = 0
    intersect = 0

    sorted_events.each {|e|

        intersect += e[:start] * (e[:start]-1) / 2 +
                     e[:start] * past_start

        past_start += e[:start]
        past_start -= e[:stop]
    }
    return intersect
end

puts int [1,1]

puts int [1,5,2,1,4,0]
share|improve this answer
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
void sortPairs(int bounds[], int len){
    int i,j, temp;
    for(i=0;i<(len-1);i++){
        for(j=i+1;j<len;j++){
            if(bounds[i] > bounds[j]){
                temp = bounds[i];
                bounds[i] = bounds[j];
                bounds[j] = temp;
                temp = bounds[i+len];
                bounds[i+len] = bounds[j+len];
                bounds[j+len] = temp;
            }
        }
    }
}
int adjacentPointPairsCount(int a[], int len){
    int count=0,i,j;
    int *bounds;
    if(len<2) {
        goto toend;
    }
    bounds = malloc(sizeof(int)*len *2);
    for(i=0; i< len; i++){
        bounds[i] = i-a[i];
        bounds[i+len] = i+a[i];
    }
    sortPairs(bounds, len);
    for(i=0;i<len;i++){
        int currentBound = bounds[i+len];
        for(j=i+1;a[j]<=currentBound;j++){
            if(count>100000){
                count=-1;
                goto toend;
            }
            count++;
        }     
    }
toend:
    free(bounds);
    return count;   
}
share|improve this answer

An Implementation of Idea stated above in Java:

public class DiscIntersectionCount {


public int number_of_disc_intersections(int[] A) {
    int[] leftPoints = new int[A.length];
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
        leftPoints[i] = i - A[i];
    }

    Arrays.sort(leftPoints);
//      System.out.println(Arrays.toString(leftPoints));
    int count  = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < A.length - 1; i++) {
        int rpoint = A[i] + i;

        int rrank = getRank(leftPoints, rpoint);

        //if disk has sifnificant radius, exclude own self
        if (rpoint > i) rrank -= 1;
        int rank = rrank; 
//          System.out.println(rpoint+" : "+rank);

        rank -= i;
        count += rank;
    }
    return count;

}

public int getRank(int A[], int num) {
    if (A==null || A.length == 0) return -1;        
    int mid = A.length/2;
    while ((mid >= 0) && (mid < A.length)) {

        if (A[mid] == num) return mid;

        if ((mid == 0) && (A[mid] > num)) return -1;
        if ((mid == (A.length - 1)) && (A[mid] < num)) return A.length;
        if (A[mid] < num && A[mid + 1] >= num) return mid + 1;
        if (A[mid] > num && A[mid - 1] <= num) return mid - 1;

        if (A[mid] < num) mid = (mid + A.length)/2;
        else  mid = (mid)/2;

    }

    return -1;
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    DiscIntersectionCount d = new DiscIntersectionCount();
    int[] A = 
        //{1,5,2,1,4,0}
        //{0,0,0,0,0,0}
    //  {1,1,2}
    {3}
     ;
    int count = d.number_of_disc_intersections(A);
    System.out.println(count);
}
}
share|improve this answer

Here is the PHP code that scored 100 on codility:

$sum=0;

//One way of cloning the A:
$start = array();
$end = array();

foreach ($A as $key=>$value)
{
$start[]=0;
$end[]=0;   
}  

for ($i=0; $i<count($A); $i++)
{
  if ($i<$A[$i]) 
  $start[0]++;
  else        
  $start[$i-$A[$i]]++;

  if ($i+$A[$i] >= count($A))   
  $end[count($A)-1]++;
  else
  $end[$i+$A[$i]]++;
}
$active=0;
for ($i=0; $i<count($A);$i++)
{
  $sum += $active*$start[$i]+($start[$i]*($start[$i]-1))/2;
  if ($sum>10000000) return -1;
  $active += $start[$i]-$end[$i];
}
return $sum;

However I dont understand the logic. This is just transformed C++ code from above. Folks, can you elaborate on what you were doing here, please?

share|improve this answer
    
I can't quite follow what this does and why. Would anyone care to take this almost line by line with explanation of what and why? –  Relequestual Dec 19 '13 at 21:15

93% score http://codility.com/demo/results/demoUWFUDS-6XY/ Only one test doesn't work why?

// you can also use includes, for example:
#include <algorithm>
#include <map>


inline bool mySortFunction(pair<int,int> p1, pair<int,int> p2)
{
    return ( p1.first < p2.first );
}

int solution ( const vector<int> &A ) {
    int i, size = A.size();
    if ( size <= 1 ) return 0;
    // Compute lower boundary of all discs and sort them in ascending order
    vector< pair<int,int> > lowBounds(size);
    for(i=0; i<size; i++) lowBounds[i] = pair<int,int>(i-A[i],i+A[i]);
    sort(lowBounds.begin(), lowBounds.end(), mySortFunction);
    // Browse discs
    long nbIntersect = 0;
    for(i=0; i<size; i++)
    {
        int curBound = lowBounds[i].second;
        for(int j=i+1; j<size && lowBounds[j].first<=curBound; j++)
        {
            nbIntersect++; 
            // Maximal number of intersections
            if ( nbIntersect > 10000000 ) return -1;
        }
    }
    return nbIntersect;
}

I tried to put also a limit in case the size is >100000 and I lost point in this case so it's not clear which is the test that they do to fail.

share|improve this answer
    
Arithmetic overflow because you do i+A[i] which can overflow an int. –  w00t 2 days ago

This is a ruby solution that scored 100/100 on codility. I'm posting it now because I'm finding it difficult to follow the already posted ruby answer.

def solution(a)
    end_points = []
    a.each_with_index do |ai, i|
        end_points << [i - ai, i + ai]
    end
    end_points = end_points.sort_by { |points| points[0]}

    intersecting_pairs = 0
    end_points.each_with_index do |point, index|
        lep, hep = point
        pairs = bsearch(end_points, index, end_points.size - 1, hep)
        return -1 if 10000000 - pairs + index < intersecting_pairs
        intersecting_pairs += (pairs - index)
    end
    return intersecting_pairs
end

# This method returns the maximally appropriate position
# where the higher end-point may have been inserted.
def bsearch(a, l, u, x)
    if l == u
        if x >= a[u][0]
            return u
        else
            return l - 1 
        end
    end
    mid = (l + u)/2

    # Notice that we are searching in higher range
    # even if we have found equality.
    if a[mid][0] <= x
        return bsearch(a, mid+1, u, x)
    else
        return bsearch(a, l, mid, x)
    end
end
share|improve this answer

Python 100 / 100 (tested) on codility, with O(nlogn) time and O(n) space.

Here is @noisyboiler's python implementation of @Aryabhatta's method with comments and an example. Full credit to original authors, any errors / poor wording are entirely my fault.

from bisect import bisect_right

def number_of_disc_intersections(A):
    pairs = 0

    # create an array of tuples, each containing the start and end indices of a disk
    # some indices may be less than 0 or greater than len(A), this is fine!
    # sort the array by the first entry of each tuple: the disk start indices
    intervals = sorted( [(i-A[i], i+A[i]) for i in range(len(A))] )

    # create an array of starting indices using tuples in intervals
    starts = [i[0] for i in intervals]

    # for each disk in order of the *starting* position of the disk, not the centre
    for i in range(len(starts)):

        # find the end position of that disk from the array of tuples
        disk_end = intervals[i][1]

        # find the index of the rightmost value less than or equal to the interval-end
        # this finds the number of disks that have started before disk i ends
        count = bisect_right(starts, disk_end )

        # subtract current position to exclude previous matches
        # this bit seemed 'magic' to me, so I think of it like this...
        # for disk i, i disks that start to the left have already been dealt with
        # subtract i from count to prevent double counting
        # subtract one more to prevent counting the disk itsself
        count -= (i+1)
        pairs += count
        if pairs > 10000000:
            return -1
    return pairs

Worked example: given [3, 0, 1, 6] the disk radii would look like this:

disk0  -------         start= -3, end= 3
disk1      .           start=  1, end= 1
disk2      ---         start=  1, end= 3
disk3  -------------   start= -3, end= 9
index  3210123456789   (digits left of zero are -ve)

intervals = [(-3, 3), (-3, 9), (1, 1), (1,3)]
starts    = [-3, -3, 1, 1]

the loop order will be: disk0, disk3, disk1, disk2

0th loop: 
    by the end of disk0, 4 disks have started 
    one of which is disk0 itself 
    none of which could have already been counted
    so add 3
1st loop: 
    by the end of disk3, 4 disks have started 
    one of which is disk3 itself
    one of which has already started to the left so is either counted OR would not overlap
    so add 2
2nd loop: 
    by the end of disk1, 4 disks have started 
    one of which is disk1 itself
    two of which have already started to the left so are either counted OR would not overlap
    so add 1
3rd loop: 
    by the end of disk2, 4 disks have started
    one of which is disk2 itself
    two of which have already started to the left so are either counted OR would not overlap
    so add 0

pairs = 6
to check: these are (0,1), (0,2), (0,2), (1,2), (1,3), (2,3),    
share|improve this answer
    
Why does this work? I tried reimplementing it in PHP, and it got 100% correctness but 0% performance. –  CMCDragonkai Oct 14 at 13:33
    
To get a 0% performance score you must be failing all of the 'performance' tests that Codility run. Maybe you could try printing out the input set for those, and examine how / why your PHP implementation is failing? This Python approach does (pass all of those tests)[codility.com/demo/results/demo58ZEHU-GNZ/]. –  GnomeDePlume Oct 14 at 20:28
    
I think I know where it's going slow. There's no bisect_right in PHP, there's no binary search at all. So I'm just iterating through the values finding how many left edges is before the right edge. Bisect is using binary search right? –  CMCDragonkai Oct 15 at 6:01
    
Sounds like that's your problem - the extra complexity of your search would make your solution O(n^2). Yes, bisect_right is binary search. Binary search is O(log(n)), and together with O(n) of the outer loop gives the O(n log(n)) complexity. –  GnomeDePlume Oct 21 at 16:36
    
Yea I implemented my own bisect_right and bisect_left for PHP, it's working. –  CMCDragonkai Oct 22 at 6:31

A 100/100 C# implementation as described by Aryabhatta (the binary search solution).

using System;

class Solution {
    public int solution(int[] A)
    {
        return IntersectingDiscs.Execute(A);
    }
}

class IntersectingDiscs
{
    public static int Execute(int[] data)
    {
        int counter = 0;

        var intervals = Interval.GetIntervals(data);

        Array.Sort(intervals); // sort by Left value

        for (int i = 0; i < intervals.Length; i++)
        {
            counter += GetCoverage(intervals, i);

            if(counter > 10000000)
            {
                return -1;
            }
        }

        return counter;
    }

    private static int GetCoverage(Interval[] intervals, int i)
    {
        var currentInterval = intervals[i];

        // search for an interval starting at currentInterval.Right

        int j = Array.BinarySearch(intervals, new Interval { Left = currentInterval.Right });

        if(j < 0)
        {
            // item not found

            j = ~j; // bitwise complement (see Array.BinarySearch documentation)

            // now j == index of the next item larger than the searched one

            j = j - 1; // set index to the previous element
        }

        while(j + 1 < intervals.Length && intervals[j].Left == intervals[j + 1].Left)
        {
            j++; // get the rightmost interval starting from currentInterval.Righ
        }

        return j - i; // reduce already processed intervals (the left side from currentInterval)
    }
}

class Interval : IComparable
{
    public long Left { get; set; }
    public long Right { get; set; }

    // Implementation of IComparable interface
    // which is used by Array.Sort().
    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        // elements will be sorted by Left value

        var another = obj as Interval;

        if (this.Left < another.Left)
        {
            return -1;
        }

        if (this.Left > another.Left)
        {
            return 1;
        }

        return 0;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Transform array items into Intervals (eg. {1, 2, 4} -> {[-1,1], [-1,3], [-2,6]}).
    /// </summary>
    public static Interval[] GetIntervals(int[] data)
    {
        var intervals = new Interval[data.Length];

        for (int i = 0; i < data.Length; i++)
        {
            // use long to avoid data overflow (eg. int.MaxValue + 1)

            long radius = data[i];

            intervals[i] = new Interval
            {
                Left = i - radius,
                Right = i + radius
            };
        }

        return intervals;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Here's a O(N) time, O(N) space algorithm requiring 3 runs across the array and no sorting, verified scoring 100%:

You're interested in pairs of discs. Each pair involves one side of one disc and the other side of the other disc. Therefore we won't have duplicate pairs if we handle one side of each disc. Let's call the sides right and left (I rotated the space while thinking about it).

An overlap is either due to a right side overlapping another disc directly at the center (so pairs equal to the radius with some care about the array length) or due to the number of left sides existing at the rightmost edge.

So we create an array that contains the number of left sides at each point and then it's a simple sum.

C code:

int solution(int A[], int N) {
    int C[N];
    int a, S=0, t=0;

    // Mark left and middle of disks
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        C[i] = -1;
        a = A[i];
        if (a>=i) {
            C[0]++;
        } else {
            C[i-a]++;
        }
    }
    // Sum of left side of disks at location
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        t += C[i];
        C[i] = t;
    }
    // Count pairs, right side only:
    // 1. overlaps based on disk size
    // 2. overlaps based on disks but not centers
    for (int i=0; i<N; i++) {
        a = A[i];
        S += ((a<N-i) ? a: N-i-1);
        if (i != N-1) {
          S += C[((a<N-i) ? i+a: N-1)];
        }
        if (S>10000000) return -1;
    }
    return S;
}
share|improve this answer

One for the copy-paste kids out there:

function number_of_disc_intersections ( $A ) {
    $intersects = array();
    $len = count($A);

    foreach($A as $i => $r ){
        if( $r > 0 ){
            $range = array();

            if( $i > 0 ){
                $range = range(max(0, $i-$r), max(0,$i-1));
            }

            if( $i < $len ){
                $range = array_merge( $range, range($i+1, min($len-1, $i+$r)));
            }

            foreach($range as $j){
                $intersects[] = array(min($i,$j), max($i,$j));
            }
        }

        if( count($intersects) > 100000000 ){
            return -1;
        }
    }
    return array_unique($intersects, SORT_REGULAR);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
very bad implementation, scores 12 out of 100. Very Slow and incorrect solution. –  Maruccio May 31 '13 at 17:51

You will get 100/100 for the below solution in Java language

if (A == null || A.length < 2) {
  return 0;
}

int[] B = Arrays.copyOf(A, A.length);
Arrays.sort(B);
int biggest = B[A.length - 1];
int intersections = 0;
for (int i = 0; i < A.length; i++) {
  for (int j = i + 1; j < A.length; j++) {
    if (j - biggest > i + A[i]) {
      break;
    }
    if (j - A[j] <= i + A[i]) {
      intersections++;
    }
    if (intersections > 10000000) {
      return -1;
    }
  }
}

return intersections;
share|improve this answer
4  
This is complexity O(N^2); Codility wants O(N log(N)) –  richard Nov 15 '11 at 13:34
    
This algorithm gives Score: 94 of 100 Detected time complexity: O(N * log(N)) or O(N) overflow arithmetic overflow tests 0.280 s. WRONG ANSWER got 1 expected 2 –  Yuriy Chernyshov Jul 5 '13 at 16:21
    
This is similar to my first attempt in Obj-c, which indeed has a time complexity of O(N^2). In objective-c it does detect it as N^2, I'm surprised it doesn't in Java, but in any case, it has a complexity of O(N^2). This is because of the double loop, despite the case that the inner most for iterates over i + 1 (j = i + 1). Gave me a 50 or so in the solution –  Javier Quevedo-Fernández Feb 1 at 11:06

protected by Community Nov 17 '13 at 5:04

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