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Let's say I want to check if a number n = 123 has duplicate digits. I tried:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    int n = 123;
    int d1 = n % 10;
    int d2 = ( n / 10 ) % 10;
    int d3 = ( n / 100 ) % 10;
    if( d1 != d2 && d1 != d3 && d2 != d3 ) {
        cout << n << " does not have duplicate digits.\n";
    }
}

Is there any faster solution to this problem?

Update
Sorry for being unclear. The code above was written in C++ only for description purpose. I have to solve this problem in TI-89, with a number of 9 digits. And since the limitation of memory and speed, I'm looking for a fastest way possible.

TI-89 only has several condition keyword:

  • If
  • If ... Then
  • when(
  • For ... EndFor
  • While ... EndWhile
  • Loop ... EndLoop
  • Custom ... EndCustom

Thanks,
Chan

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Since your solution is limited to three digit numbers, just make a hash table of the numbers that have repeating digits and check if the number is contained in it. –  aaronasterling Jan 26 '11 at 4:54
    
You also need to handle numbers with less than three digits (if that is valid input). Right now n = 1 will be rejected as having duplicate digits (the leading zeros). –  Thilo Jan 26 '11 at 5:07
    
Which language on the TI-89 are you working on? –  belisarius Jan 26 '11 at 5:11
    
@belisarius: It's not really a language. It's designed to solve Math problem only. So it does not have array. Only for, if-else, do, while and arithmetic. –  Chan Jan 26 '11 at 5:13
1  
@Chan Check this for languages recommendations on the TI-89 ocf.berkeley.edu/~pad/faq/prog.html –  belisarius Jan 26 '11 at 5:26

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Faster, possibly not (but you should measure anyway, just in case - my optimisation mantra is "measure, don't guess"). But clearer in intent, I think, yes, and able to handle arbitrary sized integers.

int hasDupes (unsigned int n) {
    // Flag to indicate digit has been used.

    int i, used[10];

    // Must have dupes if more than ten digits.

    if (n > 9999999999)
        return 1;

    // Initialise dupe flags to false.

    for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
        used[i] = 0;

    // Process all digits in number.

    while (n != 0) {
        // Already used? Return true.

        if (used[n%10])  // you can cache n%10 if compiler not too smart.
            return 1;

        // Otherwise, mark used, go to next digit.

        used[n%10] = 1;  // and you would use cached value here.
        n /= 10;
    }

    // No dupes, return false.

    return 0;
}

If you have a limited range of possibilities, you can use the time-honoured approach of sacrificing space for time.

Say you're talking of numbers between 0 and 999:

const int *hasDupes = {
//  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,  //   x
    0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,  //  1x
    0, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0,  //  2x
    :
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0, 1,  // 97x
    0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 1,  // 98x
    1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1, 1,  // 99x
};

and just do a table lookup of hasDupes[n].


Based on your edit when you need to handle nine digits, a billion-element array (second solution above) is probably not going to be possible on your calculator :-)

I would opt for the first solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your solution. However I just use C++ to describe the problem. I have to program it in TI-89, so I'm looking for a faster way. –  Chan Jan 26 '11 at 4:55
    
@Chan, this version has the advantage of exiting early as soon as a duplicate is found. It would be worth profiling to see. It also has the advantage of working for numbers with any amount of digits (although for it to be optimal in that case, it should just return false as soon as there are more than ten digits: pidgeons and holes) –  aaronasterling Jan 26 '11 at 4:58
template<class T, int radix = 10>
bool has_duplicate_digits(T n) {
    int digits_mask = 0;
    while (digits_mask |= (1 << (n % radix)), n /= radix)
        if (digits_mask & (1 << (n % radix)))
            return true;
    return false;
}

Something like that should work as long as n is nonnegative and int has at least radix bits.


digits_mask is a bitset (bit 0 represents the occurrence of a 0 digit, bit 1 represents the occurrence of a 1 digit, etc.).

The bitmap is populated with the least significant digit of n, and the rest of the digits are shifted down. If there are more digits, and the new least significant digit is marked as having occurred previously, return true, otherwise repeat.

When there are no more digits, return false.

1 << x returns 1, 2, 4, 8, etc.: masks to use to test/set bits in the bitset.

a |= z is shorthand for a = a | z, which sets bits by the union of a from z.

a & z is the intersection of the bits in a and z, and is zero (false) if none are set and non-zero (true) if any are set.

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I did a crash course in TI-89 basic to answer :)

Let's see if this works (I haven't an emulator, so can't check).

Test()
Prgm
{0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0}->A
Title "Request"
Request "Enter a number",B
EndDlog
Expr(B)->B
While  B > 1
 MOD(10,B)->C
 if A[C+1] = 1 goto K 
 1->A[C+1]
 B-C->B 
EndWhile
Title "Done"
Text "Numbers non repeating"
Enddlog
goto J

Lbl K
Title "Done"
Text "Numbers repeating"
Enddlog

Lbl J
EndPrgm
share|improve this answer
    
I have no idea if this is correct, but +1 for use of TI-basic :p B - C -> B looks fishy though. –  user166390 Jan 26 '11 at 6:16
    
@pst I agree, but I learned by example. See the first block of code examples here en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TI-BASIC :) –  belisarius Jan 26 '11 at 6:24
    
I mean I'd expected B / 10 -> B or similar for the digit lurch. –  user166390 Jan 26 '11 at 8:32
    
@pst That needs more knowledge of the language arithmetic than I have! How do you know it will return an integer? –  belisarius Jan 26 '11 at 9:33

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