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The beginning of one of my programs results in an error. This is the problem area. I am trying to define a variable as the result of a recursive function.

(define (test n)
  (define (a1func i)
    (if (= i 1) 0
        (+ (/ 1 i) (a1func (- i 1))))) 
  (define a1 (a1func (- n 1))))

if you were to give it say (test 10) the error would be:

procedure application: expected procedure, given: #<undefined>; arguments were: 9

I assumed this could be done in Scheme?? ideas?

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Your code is incomplete. Can you post the rest? –  atnnn Jan 26 '11 at 5:25
    
BTW, your code's missing a closing ) in the end of the last line. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jan 26 '11 at 5:41
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In pure FP languages computations are done passing parameters to functions, which return some values as a result. You could bind the result of test in the function which called test:

(define (test n)
  (define (a1func i)
    (if (= i 1) 0
        (+ (/ 1 i) (a1func (- i 1))))) 
  (a1func (- n 1)))

(define (calltest x)
  (define (r (test (+ 2 x))))
  (- r 4))

Variables usually bound once and cannot be changed. A function must return the value, a result of expression, but (define a1 (a1func(- n 1))) is rather a definition, not an expression, so the correct code would be:

(define (test n)
  (define (a1func i)
    (if (= i 1) 0
        (+(/ 1 i) (a1func(- i 1))))) 
  (define a1 (a1func(- n 1)))
  a1)

And since defining variable and immediate returning it is meaningless, a more correct code would be:

(define (test n)
  (define (a1func i)
    (if (= i 1) 0
        (+(/ 1 i) (a1func(- i 1))))) 
  (a1func(- n 1)))
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problem being is that I need a1 bound to the resulting value of a1func. I am using the value a1 later in the program, as well as variable n (original input). –  DJPlayer Jan 26 '11 at 5:56
    
Then you should define a1 in top of your module, because in your original definition a1 is in the scope of the function test, otherwise no other function is able to use it. If you define a1 in the top of your module, you should then define a1func the same way, so that it's accessible outside of the scope of test. –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jan 26 '11 at 6:05
    
I'm gonna take another stab at this.. and I'm not sure why I'm having such issues. So I'm starting from the beginning again.. I have a program that takes a value n. This program than has to run through several mathematical operations. some of those operations use values from earlier operations. ex. (define (a1func1 n) (let* ((e1 0)) (let* ((i (- n 1))) (if (= n 1) 0 (+(/ 1 i) (a1func1(- n 1))))))) ... I get the correct result, but need it stored globally. to use in several later functions. –  DJPlayer Jan 26 '11 at 19:17
    
@DJPlayer: In FP you don't usually store variables globally, a functional program is just a series of [mutual] calls to functions, when each function performs some calculations on given parameters and returns the result. You should get to idea that a function always returns the same result if you give it the same parameters, e. g. if you give it 2, 3 and it calculates a sum, it will always return 5, irrespective of number of calls to it. You may have global variables (using define), but they cannot be changed (if we're talking about pure FP). –  Yasir Arsanukaev Jan 26 '11 at 19:27
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If your scheme implementation support lisp macros then you can write this:

(define-macro (test n)
  (define (a1func i)
    (if (= i 1) 0
        (+ (/ 1 i) (a1func (- i 1)))))  
  `(define a1 ,(a1func (- n 1))))

or using named let

(define-macro (test n)
  `(define a1 ,(let a1func ((i (- n 1)))
                 (if (= i 1)
                     0
                     (+ (/ 1 i) (a1func (- i 1)))))))
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