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What is the use of Collections.singletonList() in Java? (I understand that it returns a list with one element. Why would I want to have a separate method to do that? How does immutability play a role here?)

Are there any special useful use-cases for this method, rather than just being a convenience method?

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Here's example of how it can be useful - stackoverflow.com/a/1239631/360811 –  shabunc May 15 '13 at 11:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 31 down vote accepted

The javadoc says this:

"Returns an immutable list containing only the specified object. The returned list is serializable."

You ask:

Why would I want to have a separate method to do that?

As a convenience ... to save you having to write a sequence of statements to:

  • create an empty list object
  • add an element to it, and
  • wrap it with an immutable wrapper.

Are there any special useful use-cases for this method, rather than just being a convenience method?

Clearly, there are use-cases where it is convenient to use the singletonList method. But I don't know how you would (objectively) distinguish between an ordinary use-case and a "specially useful" one ...

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Is it equivalent to Collections.unmodifiableSet(new Set().add())? –  Ciro Santilli 六四事件 法轮功 Feb 23 at 10:29
    
Roughly speaking, yes. (There are two errors in that snippet.) –  Stephen C Feb 23 at 11:39
    

Here's one view on the singleton methods:

I have found these various "singleton" methods to be useful for passing a single value to an API that requires a collection of that value. Of course, this works best when the code processing the passed-in value does not need to add to the collection.

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If an Immutable/Singleton collections refers to the one which having only one object and which is not further gets modified, then the same functionality can be achieved by making a collection "UnmodifiableCollection" having only one object. Since the same functionality can be achieved by Unmodifiable Collection with one object, then what special purpose the Singleton Collection serves for?

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Create an Unmodifiable Collection with one object the "normal" way and using the singleton method. Then you see immediately why. –  kap Sep 3 '14 at 0:09

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