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What does a colon following a C++ constructor name do?

I'm reading a book about CUDA & I'm having trouble reading this C++ syntax. I'm not sure what to search for so that's why I'm posting here.

struct cuComplex {
    float   r;
    float   i;
    cuComplex( float a, float b ) : r(a) , i(b)  {}
}

What does the cuComplex statement do? Specifically:

cuComplex( float a, float b ) : r(a) , i(b)  {}

what is this called so I can learn about it?

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marked as duplicate by Charles Bailey, Prasoon Saurav, Cody Gray, marcog, cHao Jan 27 '11 at 0:19

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

1  
This is C++, not C syntax. –  bdonlan Jan 26 '11 at 8:11
    
If you know C++ that look the same than constructor. I guess it have the same semantic –  mathk Jan 26 '11 at 8:12
    
I don't know CUDA, so I don't know if this is CUDA syntax, but this is definitely valid C++ syntax anyway :) –  bdonlan Jan 26 '11 at 8:15
    
This is a dupe. –  Prasoon Saurav Jan 26 '11 at 8:15
    
I didn't know what CUDA was before I saw this question (had heard the term, never looked into it), so I answered it in terms of pure C as the question was originally tagged. –  Ed S. Jan 26 '11 at 8:16

3 Answers 3

This is C++ syntax.

cuComplex( float a, float b )

is the constructor defined for this struct.

: r(a) , i(b)

is called member initialization. Here the local members r and i are set to the parameters a and b passed to the constructor.

The rest is an empty function implementation.

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ah i see, so it's the same as doing r = a –  Ninja Jan 26 '11 at 8:22
1  
No, it is the same as doing r(a), but in this case the copy constructor will do the same thing as the assignment operator. –  Ed S. Jan 26 '11 at 8:32

That is C++, not C, as C structs cannot contain functions in that manner (they could contain a function pointer, but that is irrelevant to the question). That is a constructor for the type "cuComplex" that takes two floats. It initializes the two member variables 'r' and 'r' with the passed in values.

EDIT per comment: The r(a) and i(b) parts are initializing the member variables with the values of the parameters to the constructor.

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i get the first part, but I still don't get the r(a), i(b). can you explain that a little more? Thanks –  Ninja Jan 26 '11 at 8:12
    
Do those exist in C? I was under the impression that only C++ has those. –  Joachim Sauer Jan 26 '11 at 8:13
    
No, they don't exist in C. I missed the "C" tag for about 30 seconds before editing my response :) –  Ed S. Jan 26 '11 at 8:14

: r(a) , i(b) in cuComplex ctor construct memory at allocation with value between parentheses.

struct cuComplex {
    const float   r;
    const float   i;
    cuComplex( float a, float b ) : r(a) , i(b)  {} // ok 
}

struct cuComplex {
    const float   r;
    const float   i;
    cuComplex( float a, float b ) {
        r = a;
        i = b;
    } // fail because once allocated, const memory can't be modified
}
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