Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a problem, let's say: Find all two pairs of numbers (x,y) and (z,t) such that x³ + y³ = z³ + t³, where (x, y) != (z, t) and x³ + y³ < 10,000.

Taking the cube root of 10,000 yeilds 21.544 -> round down to 21, so I got:

#include <iostream>

using namespace std;

int main() {
    for( int x = 1; x <= 20; ++x ) {
        for( int y = x + 1; y <= 21; ++y ) {
            for( int z = x + 1; z <= y - 1; ++z ) {
                for( int t = z; t <= y - 1; ++t ) {
                    if( x*x*x + y*y*y == z*z*z + t*t*t ) {
                        cout << x << ", " << y << ", " << z << ", " << t << endl; 
                    }
                }
            } 
        }
    }
    return 0;
}

I know this code could be optimized more, and that's what I'm looking for. Plus, one of my friends told me that y could be x + 2 instead of x + 1, and I doubt this since if
x = 1, then we will never have y = 2, which in this case missed one possible solution.

Any thought?

share|improve this question
    
not sure if this helps: wolframalpha.com/input/?i=x^3+%2B+y^3+%3D+z^3+%2B+t^3%2C+x+%21%3D+z%2‌​C+y+%21%3D+t –  Mark Jan 26 '11 at 8:55
    
For anecdotes on this see mathworld.wolfram.com/TaxicabNumber.html –  Sven Marnach Jan 26 '11 at 9:06
    
You may want to have a look at euler.free.fr –  Eric Bainville Jan 26 '11 at 9:55
1  
Why are you trying to optimize it? Your exact code runs in 0.003s on my machine. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 10:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Typical tradeoff: memory for speed.

First the bound on x is quite large: if we suppose that (x,y) is ordered with x <= y, then

    x^3 + y^3 < N and x^3 < y^3 (for positive numbers)
=>  x^3 + x^3 < N (by transitivity)
<=> x^3 < N/2
<=> x <= floor((N/2)^(1/3))

Thus x <= 17 here.

Now, let us memoize the result of x^3 + y^3 and build an associative table (sum -> pairs). By the way, is there a reason to discard (x,x) as a pair ?

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  typedef std::pair<unsigned short, unsigned short> Pair;
  typedef std::vector<Pair> PairsList;
  typedef std::unordered_map<unsigned short, PairsList> SumMap;

  // Note: arbitrary limitation, N cannot exceed 2^16 on most architectures
  // because of the choice of using an `unsigned short`
  unsigned short N = 10000;
  if (argc > 1) { N = boost::lexical_cast<unsigned short>(argv[1]);  }

  SumMap sumMap;

  for (unsigned short x = 1; x*x*x <= N/2; ++x)
  {
    for (unsigned short y = x; x*x*x + y*y*y <= N; ++y)
    {
      sumMap[x*x*x + y*y*y].push_back(Pair(x,y));
    }
  }

  for (SumMap::const_reference ref: sumMap)
  {
    if (ref.second.size() > 1)
    {
      std::cout << "Sum: " << ref.first
                << " can be achieved with " << ref.second << "\n";
      // I'll let you overload the print operator for a vector of pairs
    }
  }

  return 0;
}

We are O(N^2) here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for a very detailed analysis and great solution ;) –  Chan Jan 27 '11 at 1:11

Well there's one obvious algorithmic optimization that can be made given the current loop structure, you optimize quite rightly by limiting your ranges to the cube root of 10,000. However you can go farther and limit your range on y based on the cube root of 10,000 - x. That's one thing you can do.

The other optimization is that there's no reason on earth that this should be 4 loops. Simply do 2 loops and compute the values of x^3 + y^3 and check for duplicates. (This is as good as you're going to get without delving into features of cube roots.) This isn't actually using the API correctly but you get the idea:

multimap<int, std::pair<int, int> > map;
for (int i = 1; i < 21; i++) {
    (for int j = x; j < cube_root(10000 - i^3); j++ {
        multimap.insert (i^3 + j^3, std::pair<int, int>(i,j);

Then you just iterate through the multimap and look for repeats.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Six answers and this is the only one mentioning reducing loop count (although, without much details). What were these people thinking about? –  Nikita Rybak Jan 26 '11 at 10:15
    
@Nikita let there be details. –  Joe Doliner Jan 26 '11 at 11:06
1  
+1 for making a table of sums of cubes: O(N^2/3 log N): although we can improve it bit still. I just generate the table of cubes first, knowing when you pass N, then generate the multi-hashmap (lower complexity than multimap). –  CashCow Jan 26 '11 at 14:49
    
Thanks for an elegant solution! –  Chan Jan 27 '11 at 1:11

Make a list of all numbers and their operational result. Sort the list by the results. Test matching results for having different operands.

share|improve this answer

Use a table from sums to the set of pairs of numbers generating that sum.

You can generate that table by two nested for loops, and then run through the table collecting the sums with multiple solutions.

share|improve this answer

I'd suggest calculating the powers in outer loops (EDIT: Moved calculations out of the for loops):

int x3, y3, z3;
for( int x = 1; x <= 20; ++x ) {
    x3 = x * x * x;
    for( int y = x + 1; y <= 21; ++y ) {
        y3 = y * y * y;
        for( int z = x + 1; z <= y - 1; ++z ) {
            z3 = z * z * z;
            for( int t = z; t <= y - 1; ++t ) {
                if( x3 + y3 == z3 + t*t*t ) {
                    cout << x << ", " << y << ", " << z << ", " << t << endl; 
                }
            }
        } 
    }
}

Anyway, why do you want to optimize (at least for this example)? This runs in 20 ms on my PC... So I guess you have similar problems at a larger scale.

share|improve this answer
1  
@shnaader: It's not just about programming, it's about logic thinking. I just want to try, that's all! Thanks anyways! –  Chan Jan 26 '11 at 9:06
1  
You have the right idea but got it wrong programatically: x3, y3 and z3 there are not calculated until it "continues" i.e. the next loop iteration so the first time these are all uninitialised and subsequently they clash with the sequence point of the ++x so it is not determined what x is at this point. –  CashCow Jan 26 '11 at 9:34
    
Though Etienne is missing declarations for xxx, xxx_plus_yyy, and zzz, I find that style much more readable than cramming in the loop increment expression – and it works correctly on the first iteration. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 9:37
    
@CashCow: Thanks, I used the correct version first, but thought it would be more elegant to move the calculations inside the for. As it turns out, it was more elegant, but wrong... (and as Fred said, you can argue about readability, too) –  schnaader Jan 26 '11 at 9:47
    
Loop Invariant Code Motion: llvm.org/docs/Passes.html#licm –  Matthieu M. Jan 26 '11 at 10:36

As a general summary:

  • Calculate the cubes as you loop rather than at the end, thus int xcubed = x*x*x; just after the loop of x (similarly with y and z). This saves you calculating the same values multiple times. Put them in a table so you only calculate these once.
  • Create a table of sums of cubes, using a hash_table of some extent, and let it hold duplicates (not to be confused with a hashed-collision).
  • Any that has a duplicate is a solution.

1729 should come up as one of your solutions by the way. 1 cubed plus 12 cubed and also 9 cubed + 10 cubed.

To test performance you could of course pick a much higher value of maxsum (as well as run it several times).

The algorithm is strictly O(N^2/3). (2/3 because you go only to the cube-root of N and then it is O(m^2) on that smaller range).

share|improve this answer
    
Loop Invariant Code Motion: llvm.org/docs/Passes.html#licm –  Matthieu M. Jan 26 '11 at 10:36
    
Thanks for a nice analysis and clear explanation. –  Chan Jan 27 '11 at 1:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.