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EDIT: Okay, I've got a specific question. I want to implement 'exchange' functionality with acquire and release semantic (pseudo-code):

interlocked_inc_32(target)
{
    mov  ecx, 1
    lea  eax, target
    lock xadd, [eax], ecx
}

interlocked_inc_32_acq(target)
{
    lfence
    mov  ecx, 1
    lea  eax, target
    lock xadd, [eax], ecx
}

interlocked_inc_32_rel(target)
{
    sfence
    mov  ecx, 1
    lea  eax, target
    lock xadd, [eax], ecx
}

The problem with that is: I have no idea how to implement this. I'm developing under windows using Microsofts Visual Studio 2010. Sure, there are "intrin.h" and "Windows.h" which provide exactly these functions / intrinsics. BUT there InterlockedIncrementAcquire is just a define for InterlockedIncrement and provides a full memory barrier. That's not wht I'm after.

/**************************************** original post: /****************************************

I want to write a atomic class like C++0x std::atomic. I just want to be sure if my thoughts about it are right.

I would like to implement the following code: EDIT (replaced bad implementation)

enum memory_order { memory_order_acquire, memory_order_release, memory_order_acq_rel };

template<class T> class atomic;
template<class atomic_type, std::size_t = sizeof(typename ExtractType<atomic_type>::type)> struct interlocked;

template<template<class> class atomic_type> struct interlocked<atomic_type, 1>
{
    typedef typename ExtractType<atomic_type>::type bit8_type;

    void store(bit8_type value, memory_order order = memory_order_acq_rel) volatile {
        interlocked_xchg_8<order>(&static_cast<atomic_type volatile*>(this)->m_value, value);  
    }

    bit8_type load(memory_order order = memory_order_acq_rel) const volatile
    { 
        interlocked_cmp_xchg_8<order>(
            const_cast<bit8_type volatile*>(&static_cast<volatile const atomic_type *const>(this)->m_value), 
            static_cast<atomic_type const volatile*>(this)->m_value, 
            static_cast<atomic_type const volatile*>(this)->m_value
        ); 
    }

    bit8_type exhange(bit8_type, memory_order order = memory_order_acq_rel) volatile {
        return interlocked_xchg_8<order>(&static_cast<atomic_type volatile*>(this)->m_value, value);
    }

    bool compare_exchange(bit8_type comperand, bit8_type new_value, memory_order order = memory_order_acq_rel) volatile 
    {
        return interlocked_cmp_xchg_8<order>(
            &static_cast<atomic_type volatile*>(this)->m_value,
            new_value,
            comperand
        ) == comperand;

    }
};

template<template<class> class atomic_type> struct interlocked<atomic_type, 2> { };
template<template<class> class atomic_type> struct interlocked<atomic_type, 4> { };
template<template<class> class atomic_type> struct interlocked<atomic_type, 8> { };


template<class T>
class atomic : public interlocked<atomic<T>> { T m_value; };

Is there anything what I'm missing or is this a "good" quite good implementation.

Thanks for any comment. Best regards:

PS: I don't want to start a new question for this: What's the advantage of using boost::uint32_t (in boost\cstdint.h) instead of uint32_t (in stdint.h)?

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1  
stdint.h is not part of C++ standard. It's C99 library. –  UmmaGumma Jan 26 '11 at 9:23
1  
SO is a site for getting specific answers to specific questions. If you have specific doubts, ask specifically for those. –  Björn Pollex Jan 26 '11 at 9:28
    
@Space_C0wB0y: The question is: Does this implementation have any disadvantages in comparison to the C++0x implementation? –  0xbadf00d Jan 26 '11 at 9:49
    
"Is there anything I'm missing?" I don't know. Did you test it thoroughly? If not, then probably. –  Chris Lutz Jan 26 '11 at 9:51
3  
@FrEEzE2046: Many people have written very long papers and blog-posts about the implementation of atomic. A full answer to this question would span several pages. This question is just to unspecific for a site like this. –  Björn Pollex Jan 26 '11 at 9:52
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2 Answers

Are you targeting x86 hardware? Doesn't its cache synchronization scheme imply that full memory barriers is what you get? How are you trying to improve on that?

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1  
and InterlockedIncrementAcquire isn't a #define for InterlockedIncrement on Itanium, where different types of fences/barriers exist. –  Ben Voigt Feb 2 '11 at 22:52
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The problem that you are facing here is that the lock prefix implies a full memory barrier (mfence). That is, because on the previous x86 processors there was not different kind of memory barriers and separate sfence/lfence instructions.

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