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I'm trying to learn Gson and I'm struggling with field exclusion. Here are my classes

public class Student {    
  private Long                id;
  private String              firstName        = "Philip";
  private String              middleName       = "J.";
  private String              initials         = "P.F";
  private String              lastName         = "Fry";
  private Country             country;
  private Country             countryOfBirth;
}

public class Country {    
  private Long                id;
  private String              name;
  private Object              other;
}

I can use the GsonBuilder and add an ExclusionStrategy for a field name like firstName or country but I can't seem to manage to exclude properties of certain fields like country.name.

Using the method public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes fa), FieldAttributes doesn't contain enough information to match the field with a filter like country.name.

I would appreciate any help with a solution for this problem.

P.S: I want to avoid annotations since I want to improve on this and use RegEx to filter fields out.

Thank you

Edit: I'm trying to see if it's possible to emulate the behavior of Struts2 JSON plugin

using Gson

<interceptor-ref name="json">
  <param name="enableSMD">true</param>
  <param name="excludeProperties">
    login.password,
    studentList.*\.sin
  </param>
</interceptor-ref>

Edit: I reopened the question with the following addition:

I added a second field with the same type to futher clarify this problem. Basically I want to exclude country.name but not countrOfBirth.name. I also don't want to exclude Country as a type. So the types are the same it's the actual place in the object graph that I want to pinpoint and exclude.

share|improve this question
    
added Java and JSON tags. –  Nishant Jan 26 '11 at 10:17
    
Still as of version 2.2 I still can't specify a path to field to exclude. flexjson.sourceforge.net feels like a good alternative. –  Liviu T. Feb 8 '13 at 21:50

7 Answers 7

Nishant provided a good solution, but there's an easier way. Simply mark the desired fields with the @Expose annotation, such as:

@Expose private Long id;

Leave out any fields that you do not want to serialize. Then just create your Gson object this way:

Gson gson = new GsonBuilder().excludeFieldsWithoutExposeAnnotation().create();
share|improve this answer
6  
Annotation named Expose, not Exposed. –  Marboni Oct 18 '12 at 8:35
1  
@Marboni fixed. Thanks –  JayPea Oct 18 '12 at 14:23
9  
Is it possible to have something like "notExpose" and only ignore those for the case where all but one field must be serialized and adding annotations to all of them is redundant? –  DaSh Feb 18 at 0:19
1  
@DaSh I recently had such a scenario. It was very easy to write a custom ExclusionStrategy which did exactly that. See Nishant's answer. The only problem was to include a bunch of container classes and fiddle with skipclass vs skipfield (fields can be classes...) –  keyser Jul 14 at 11:20
1  
@DaSh My answer below does exactly that. –  Derek Aug 26 at 3:37

Any fields you don't want serialized in general you should use the "transient" modifier, and this also applies to json serializers (at least it does to a few that I have used, including gson).

If you don't want name to show up in the serialized json give it a transient keyword, eg:

private transient String name;
share|improve this answer
1  
it's almost the same thing as an exclusion annotation as in it applies to all instances of that class. I wanted runtime dynamic exclusion. I some cases I want some fields excluded in order to provide a lighter/restricted response and in others I want the full object serialized –  Liviu T. May 7 '11 at 7:36
2  
One thing to note is that transient effects both serialization and deserialization. It will also emit the value from been serialized into the object, even if it is present in the JSON. –  Kong Apr 16 '13 at 3:48
7  
+1 This is by far the easiest solution. –  asteri Dec 31 '13 at 15:07
    
Great way of exclusion. It helps me to generate JSON configs from POJOs to use with TickTick. –  Viacheslav Dobromyslov Oct 5 at 3:45
    
The problem with using transient instead of @Expose is that you still have to mock up a POJO on your client with all fields that could possibly come in. In the case of a back-end API that might be shared among projects, this could be problematic in case additional fields are added. Essentially it is whitelisting vs blacklisting of the fields. –  mattblang Nov 25 at 17:08

So, you want to exclude firstName and country.name. Here is what your ExclusionStrategy should look like

    public class TestExclStrat implements ExclusionStrategy {

        public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> arg0) {
            return false;
        }

        public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes f) {

            return (f.getDeclaringClass() == Student.class && f.getName().equals("firstName"))||
            (f.getDeclaringClass() == Country.class && f.getName().equals("name"));
        }

    }

If you see closely it returns true for Student.firstName and Country.name, which is what you want to exclude.

You need to apply this ExclusionStrategy like this,

    Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
        .setExclusionStrategies(new TestExclStrat())
        //.serializeNulls() <-- uncomment to serialize NULL fields as well
        .create();
    Student src = new Student();
    String json = gson.toJson(src);
    System.out.println(json);

This returns:

{"middleName":"J.","initials":"P.F","lastName":"Fry","country":{"id":91}}

I assume the country object is initialized with id = 91L in student class.


You may get fancy. For example, you do not want to serialize any field that contains "name" string in it's name. Do this

public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes f) {
    return f.getName().toLowerCase().contains("name"); 
}

this will return

{"initials":"P.F","country":{"id":91}}


EDIT: Added more info as requested.

This ExclusionStrategy will do the thing, but you need to pass "Fully Qualified Field Name". See below:

    public class TestExclStrat implements ExclusionStrategy {

        private Class<?> c;
        private String fieldName;
        public TestExclStrat(String fqfn) throws SecurityException, NoSuchFieldException, ClassNotFoundException
        {
            this.c = Class.forName(fqfn.substring(0, fqfn.lastIndexOf(".")));
            this.fieldName = fqfn.substring(fqfn.lastIndexOf(".")+1);
        }
        public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> arg0) {
            return false;
        }

        public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes f) {

            return (f.getDeclaringClass() == c && f.getName().equals(fieldName));
        }

    }

Here is how we can use it generically.

    Gson gson = new GsonBuilder()
        .setExclusionStrategies(new TestExclStrat("in.naishe.test.Country.name"))
        //.serializeNulls()
        .create();
    Student src = new Student();
    String json = gson.toJson(src);
    System.out.println(json); 

It returns

{"firstName":"Philip","middleName":"J.","initials":"P.F","lastName":"Fry","country":{"id":91}}

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for you answer. What I want is to create an ExclusionStrategy that can take a string like country.name and only exlude the field name when serializing the field country. It should be generic enough to apply to every class that has a property named country of the Country class. I don't want to create an ExclusionStrategy for every class –  Liviu T. Jan 26 '11 at 11:59
    
@Liviu T. I have updated the answer. That takes generic approach. You may get even more creative, but I kept it elemental. –  Nishant Jan 26 '11 at 12:48
    
Ty for the update. What I;m trying to see if it's possible to know where in the object graph I am when the method it called so I can exclude some fields of country but not countryOfBirth(for example) so same class but different properties. I've edited my question to clarify what I'm trying to achieve –  Liviu T. Jan 26 '11 at 15:08
    
Is there a way to exclude fields which has empty values? –  ykartal Jul 21 '11 at 11:48
    
I have the same question than @ykartal. How can I exclude empty fields? –  VansFannel Jul 11 '13 at 9:48

I ran into this issue, in which I had a small number of fields I wanted to exclude only from serialization, so I developed a fairly simple solution that uses Gson's @Expose annotation with custom exclusion strategies.

The only built-in way to use @Expose is by setting GsonBuilder.excludeFieldsWithoutExposeAnnotation(), but as the name indicates, fields without an explicit @Expose are ignored. As I only had a few fields I wanted to exclude, I found the prospect of adding the annotation to every field very cumbersome.

I effectively wanted the inverse, in which everything was included unless I explicitly used @Expose to exclude it. I used the following exclusion strategies to accomplish this:

new GsonBuilder()
        .addSerializationExclusionStrategy(new ExclusionStrategy() {
            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes fieldAttributes) {
                final Expose expose = fieldAttributes.getAnnotation(Expose.class);
                return expose != null && !expose.serialize();
            }

            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> aClass) {
                return false;
            }
        })
        .addDeserializationExclusionStrategy(new ExclusionStrategy() {
            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes fieldAttributes) {
                final Expose expose = fieldAttributes.getAnnotation(Expose.class);
                return expose != null && !expose.deserialize();
            }

            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> aClass) {
                return false;
            }
        })
        .create();

Now I can easily exclude a few fields with @Expose(serialize = false) or @Expose(deserialize = false) annotations (note that the default value for both @Expose attributes is true). You can of course use @Expose(serialize = false, deserialize = false), but that is more concisely accomplished by declaring the field transient instead (which does still take effect with these custom exclusion strategies).

share|improve this answer
1  
So awesome thx! –  Mark Lapasa Apr 24 at 19:58
2  
Love this solution! Makes it really easy to exclude things without having to throw @Expose all over everything else. –  gyoda Aug 25 at 20:51

I came up with a class factory to support this functionality. Pass in any combination of either fields or classes you want to exclude.

public class GsonFactory {

    public static Gson build(final List<String> fieldExclusions, final List<Class<?>> classExclusions) {
        GsonBuilder b = new GsonBuilder();
        b.addSerializationExclusionStrategy(new ExclusionStrategy() {
            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipField(FieldAttributes f) {
                return fieldExclusions == null ? false : fieldExclusions.contains(f.getName());
            }

            @Override
            public boolean shouldSkipClass(Class<?> clazz) {
                return classExclusions == null ? false : classExclusions.contains(clazz);
            }
        });
        return b.create();

    }
}

To use, create two lists (each is optional), and create your GSON object:

static {
 List<String> fieldExclusions = new ArrayList<String>();
 fieldExclusions.add("id");
 fieldExclusions.add("provider");
 fieldExclusions.add("products");

 List<Class<?>> classExclusions = new ArrayList<Class<?>>();
 classExclusions.add(Product.class);
 GSON = GsonFactory.build(null, classExclusions);
}

private static final Gson GSON;

public String getSomeJson(){
    List<Provider> list = getEntitiesFromDatabase();
    return GSON.toJson(list);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Of course, this can be modified to look at the fully qualified name of the attribute and exclude that upon a match... –  Domenic D. Apr 26 '12 at 18:07
    
Interesting...I'll take a look. Thank you. –  Liviu T. Apr 26 '12 at 21:05

You can explore the json tree with gson.

Try something like this :

gson.toJsonTree(student).getAsJsonObject()
.get("country").getAsJsonObject().remove("name");

You can add some properties also :

gson.toJsonTree(student).getAsJsonObject().addProperty("isGoodStudent", false);

Tested with gson 2.2.4.

share|improve this answer
1  
This looks like it would do the job. +1. I'll let it stay a while but this looks like the correct answer. –  Liviu T. Feb 6 at 21:54

Or can say whats fields not will expose with:

Gson gson = gsonBuilder.excludeFieldsWithModifiers(Modifier.TRANSIENT).create();

on your class on attribute:

private **transient** boolean nameAttribute;
share|improve this answer
2  
Transient and static fields are excluded by default; there's no need to call excludeFieldsWithModifiers() for that. –  Derek Jul 18 '13 at 20:53

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