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I have a problem with my program, I work actually on interpolation with Cubic BSplines, but when I call my interpolate function in main() I get a wrong result, and when I write directly the function in main() it works :(. I can not see what is the difference between the both.

void CubicBSpline::interpolation(){
  Point3d point;
  for(unsigned int i = 3; i < (knots->m_points).size(); i++){
    for(double t=0; t<1; t+=0.1){
      point = bSplineCubicUniform(i, t);
      cout << point.x << " " << point.y <<endl;
    }
  }
}

int main(){
  CubicBSpline cbs(4, 4);
  cbs.interpolation(); //this is the call of my function but I got a wrong result

  // and here I write directly my function and that's work good
  Point3d point;
  for(unsigned int i = 3; i < (cbs.knots->m_points).size(); i++){
    for(double t=0; t<1; t+=0.1){
      point = cbs.bSplineCubicUniform(i, t);
      cout << point.x << " " << point.y <<endl;
    }
  }
  return 0;
}
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10  
What do you mean by "wrong result"? –  Simone Jan 26 '11 at 10:15
7  
Hard to tell without seeing the rest of the code... may be is for example a problem with uninitialized variables. What happens if you move the cbs.interpolation call AFTER the explicit calls in main? –  6502 Jan 26 '11 at 10:16
    
And by the way, that's a method not a function! –  Amokrane Chentir Jan 26 '11 at 10:17
3  
@Amokrane: If you want to be pedantic, it's a member function, a type of function. In C++, there is no such thing as a method. –  GManNickG Jan 26 '11 at 10:25
1  
I found the origin of the error, it's Point3d, in my exemple I use it like that: struct Point3d{ double x, y, z}; I replaced it with a vector<double> and thats work. but I don't know what is the problem with Point3d. –  CHAKRI Jan 26 '11 at 11:56

1 Answer 1

Your description is decidedly uninformative (and it seems you'd rather respond with abrasive comments than provide more information) so all I can give you is a general answer. A bunch of things could be different between these two cases. Firstly presumably these two functions are defined within different files therefore depending on what's included different types could have entirely different definitions. From what I can see you don't have any scoping problems, but maybe I'm wrong. And also since you don't provide us with code for these other functions who knows what side effects they have.

However honestly I think that your problem most likely is due to an optimization that the compiler makes when the function is inlined. (Try compiling without optimizations).

Finally the most glaringly bad thing here is that you have a loop that uses a double as its iterator... are you kidding me? Who knows how many times that loop get's executed. It's entirely dependent on the compiler's floating point round off, which means not only is it unpredictable, but even if you get lucky and it works on your machine, who knows if it will work on other ones.

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3  
There's a decent answer in here, hidden under the distracting negative tone. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 11:55
1  
The solution to the floating point problem would be to use an integer counter i (in this case from 0 to 10) and then pass i * 0.1 to the function. –  Björn Pollex Jan 26 '11 at 13:05

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