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is this code ok?

void SomeClass :: foo(const char * _name) {
     //name is of type const char *
     name = std::string(_name).c_str();
}

it looks like it is working, but iam not sure if it is ok

should i do an old school strcpy ?

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2  
WTF o_O. You're passing it a const char*, converting to std::string and back to const char*??? What on earth for? –  mingos Jan 26 '11 at 11:47
    
@mingos: I suspect the OP posted the question due to some uncertainty over the scope and lifetime of things like temporaries, thinking that creating a string and extracting the c_str() might somehow do the copy without them having to explicitly allocate buffers and call strcpy. It's a perfectly reasonable — and common — mistake for a novice C++ programmer. –  Marcelo Cantos Jan 26 '11 at 11:55
    
@Marcelo: OK, I didn't take such a possibility into consideration :). –  mingos Jan 26 '11 at 11:57

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's ok since it compiles and doesn't cause undefined behavior.

It's not ok since name points to an invalid memory after the statement completes execution.

name = std::string(_name).c_str();

At the end of this statement the temporary std::string is destroyed and it frees the memory of c_str().

should i do an old school strcpy ?

No, just change name to be std::string:

void SomeClass :: foo(const char * _name) {
     //name is of type std::string
     name = _name;
}
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It's not okay to use it afterwards - the memory can be freed as soon as the temporary goes. Why don't you use a string as a member? Then you wouldn't have to worry about memory management.

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If you don't do anything with name, it's perfectly safe. Otherwise, it will probably fail at some random point in the future. The C-style pointer returned by the c_str() member function is only valid for as long as the temporary std::string exists (and as long as you don't mutate it, which you haven't in this case). As soon as the enclosing block scope exits, the temporary is destroyed, and any use of name puts you into the twilight zone.

As others have suggested, you should turn name into a std::string. Alternatively — if you really need it to stay a char * — you could just write name = strdup(_name).

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In this case you create a temporary object and assign it to your pointer. When you leave the function this object is destroyed and your pointer points to nowhere. In your case it might work because the memory is not overwritten yet. But you should use strcpy to avoid this problem.

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The temporary object is destroyed at the end of the full expression, not at the end of the function. –  James McNellis Jan 26 '11 at 11:51

I vote for strcpy. Why complicate simple things?

Or even better - since you'll obviously need to use it later, why not convert it to a std::string and just use that afterwards, forgetting about all those char *?

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