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We have a multilingual site that utilizes asp.net 2.0 cultures. The current culture is set through the url rewritten as a query string. (~/es/blah.aspx is the spanish version of ~/blah.aspx - rewritten as ~/blah.aspx?lang=es)

The code that tests the culture is as follows:

    System.Globalization.CultureInfo ci;
    try
    {
        ci = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo(Request.QueryString["lang"] ?? string.Empty);
    }
    catch
    {
        ci = new System.Globalization.CultureInfo(string.Empty);
    }

If there is no culture set, it defaults to english, 127. When there is a culture, all links on that page are then pre-pended with the correct culture name.

Some how or another a spider got a hold of a few links in the form of ~/www.test.com/blah.aspx and is hammering our site with a culture of www.test.com which and flooding our error logging.

Is there any way to test whether a culture name is valid besides catching an exception?

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5 Answers 5

I thought I'd have a quick go at measuring this so knocked up a quick console application.

It basically uses all 3 methods (constructor, LINQ and foreach) to get a CultureInfo from a string 10000 times in a loop. I removed the stopwatch and console output for brevity.

string culture = "en-GB";
CultureInfo[] cultures = CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.SpecificCultures);
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    try
    {
        CultureInfo c = new CultureInfo(culture);
    }
    catch
    {
    }
}
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    CultureInfo c = cultures.FirstOrDefault((x) => x.Name == culture);
}
for (int i = 0; i < 10000; i++)
{
    foreach (CultureInfo c in cultures)
    {
        if (c.Name == culture)
            break;
    }
}

The results are as follows...

Try Catch: 00:00:00.0023860
LINQ: 00:00:00.0542459
ForEach: 00:00:00.0238937

If you remove the cultures variable and call it each iteration then the LINQ and ForEach loops take about 2.5 seconds.

So, using the constructor is favourable if you expect to get lots of valid inputs and only the odd invalid one. But if you change the value if the input from en-GB to TEST then things change massively.

Invalid Culture Try Catch: 00:00:39.7163513
Invalid Culture LINQ: 00:00:00.0791752
Invalid Culture ForEach: 00:00:00.0291480

Obviously my test application isn't a real world scenario but since the OP said this is called on a per request basis I can imagine that in a large web application this code could get called a lot. It's possibly a denial or service vector, take up all the CPU by spamming the web server with requests that all have an invalid culture parameter.

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Pretty much the same answer as already stated only with a more compact linq expression:

private static bool IsValidCultureInfoName(string name)
{
    return 
        CultureInfo
        .GetCultures(CultureTypes.SpecificCultures)
        .Any(c => c.Name == name);
}
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You don't have to use LINQ:

private static bool IsValidCultureName(string cultureName)
{
    CultureInfo[] cultures =
        CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.SpecificCultures);
    foreach (CultureInfo culture in cultures)
    {
        if (culture.Name == cultureName)
            return true;
    }

    return false;
}

This could be quite expensive, but possibly still cheaper than dealing with exceptions, which are quite expensive -- measure the difference before taking my word for it, though.

I don't think that the list of defined cultures will change between .NET releases, so you should probably get the list at startup and cache it somewhere.

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+1, nice work. I still think it's probably over kill to do this, though. –  Michael Haren Jan 27 '09 at 1:04
    
I did some quick tests to see which is the best way to do this, I thought the results warrant a new answer. If you're still interested see below. –  BenCr Sep 11 '12 at 17:28
    
In Microsoft's code, they already cache the list of cultures in a Dictionary, so there's not much point of caching it again yourself. That being said, we did see a measurable performance gain by caching a CultureInfo object rather than constructing a new one on each request. –  DannyMeister May 29 at 22:00

This site has an example using LINQ:

CultureInfo[] cultures = System.Globalization.CultureInfo.GetCultures
                         (CultureTypes.SpecificCultures);

var selectCulture = from p in cultures
                    where p.Name == value
                    select p;

if (selectCulture.Count() == 1)
{
    // your culture is good
}

It seems a bit heavy, though. I'd probably stick with what you have.

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Thanks, but I should have mentioned we're still on .net 2.0 –  Adam Jan 26 '09 at 16:55
    
You can pull out the parts you need. Roger turned it into .net 2.0 for you. –  Michael Haren Jan 27 '09 at 1:03

Here's what I ended up doing for my Action Filter. We are only checking for the language, not the locale.

public class HttpInternationalizationAttribute : ActionFilterAttribute
{
    private static readonly HashSet<string> Langs = new HashSet<string>(CultureInfo.GetCultures(CultureTypes.NeutralCultures)
                                                                           .Select(x => x.TwoLetterISOLanguageName.ToUpper()));

    public override void OnActionExecuting(HttpActionContext actionContext)
    {
        var language = (string)actionContext.ControllerContext.RouteData.Values["language"];

        if (!string.IsNullOrEmpty(language) && Langs.Contains(language.ToUpper()))
        {
            Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentCulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo(language);
            Thread.CurrentThread.CurrentUICulture = CultureInfo.GetCultureInfo(language);
        }
    }
}

Using a hashset, this will run in O(1).

Cheers !

share|improve this answer
    
If you use a dictionary<string, cultureInfo> to avoid the GetCultureInfo calls it will speed it up significantly. –  MHollis May 28 at 19:52

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