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The question is how to convert wstring to string?

I have next example :

#include <string>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    std::wstring ws = L"Hello";
    std::string s( ws.begin(), ws.end() );

  //std::cout <<"std::string =     "<<s<<std::endl;
    std::wcout<<"std::wstring =    "<<ws<<std::endl;
    std::cout <<"std::string =     "<<s<<std::endl;
}

the output with commented out line is :

std::string =     Hello
std::wstring =    Hello
std::string =     Hello

but without is only :

std::wstring =    Hello

Is anything wrong in the example? Can I do the conversion like above?

EDIT

New example (taking into account some answers) is

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <locale>

int main()
{
    setlocale(LC_CTYPE, "");

    const std::wstring ws = L"Hello";
    const std::string s( ws.begin(), ws.end() );

    std::cout<<"std::string =     "<<s<<std::endl;
    std::wcout<<"std::wstring =    "<<ws<<std::endl;

    std::stringstream ss;
    ss << ws.c_str();
    std::cout<<"std::stringstream =     "<<ss.str()<<std::endl;
}

The output is :

std::string =     Hello
std::wstring =    Hello
std::stringstream =     0x860283c

therefore the stringstream can not be used to convert wstring into string.

share|improve this question
3  
How can you ask this question without specifying also the encodings? –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '11 at 12:15
4  
@tenfour: Why use std::wstring at all? stackoverflow.com/questions/1049947/… –  dalle Jan 26 '11 at 13:14
5  
@dalle If you have data that is already encoded with UTF-16, whether or not UTF-16 is considered harmful is somewhat moot. And for what it's worth, I don't think any transformation form is harmful; what is harmful is people thinking they understand Unicode when in fact they don't. –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '11 at 13:17
2  
Does it have to be a cross-platform solution? –  ali_bahoo Jan 26 '11 at 13:18
1  
@sad_man If you can make one that is better. If not, I would prefer a linux solution. –  BЈовић Jan 26 '11 at 13:22

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Here is a worked-out solution based on the other suggestions:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <clocale>
#include <locale>
#include <vector>

int main() {
  std::setlocale(LC_ALL, "");
  const std::wstring ws = L"ħëłlö";
  const std::locale locale("");
  typedef std::codecvt<wchar_t, char, std::mbstate_t> converter_type;
  const converter_type& converter = std::use_facet<converter_type>(locale);
  std::vector<char> to(ws.length() * converter.max_length());
  std::mbstate_t state;
  const wchar_t* from_next;
  char* to_next;
  const converter_type::result result = converter.out(state, ws.data(), ws.data() + ws.length(), from_next, &to[0], &to[0] + to.size(), to_next);
  if (result == converter_type::ok or result == converter_type::noconv) {
    const std::string s(&to[0], to_next);
    std::cout <<"std::string =     "<<s<<std::endl;
  }
}

This will usually work for Linux, but will create problems on Windows.

share|improve this answer
    
you have a memory leak if no exception is thrown ? you could use std::vector<char> instead of dynamic char array. –  smerlin Jan 26 '11 at 14:11
2  
using std::wcout.imbue(locale) should do the job aswell, and it has the benefit that it does not change any global state. –  smerlin Jan 26 '11 at 15:22
6  
The std::wstring_convert from C++11 wraps up a lot of this noise. –  Cubbi Sep 27 '11 at 19:34
2  
@Philipp, what do you mean "will create problems on Windows"? What kind of problems? –  Gili Nov 23 '11 at 21:45
1  
The above code gives (as copied) gives me a *** glibc detected *** test: malloc(): smallbin double linked list corrupted: 0x000000000180ea30 *** on linux 64-bit (gcc 4.7.3). Anybody else experiencing this? –  hogliux Nov 10 '13 at 12:22

As Cubbi pointed out in one of the comments, std::wstring_convert (C++11) provides a neat simple solution:

wstring string_to_convert;

//setup converter
typedef std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t> convert_type;
std::wstring_convert<convert_type, wchar_t> converter;

//use converter (.to_bytes: wstr->str, .from_bytes: str->wstr)
std::string converted_str = converter.to_bytes( string_to_convert );

I was using a combination of wcstombs and tedious allocation/deallocation of memory before I came across this.

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/locale/wstring_convert

update(2013.11.28)

One liners can be stated as so (Thank you Guss for your comment):

std::wstring str = std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t>>().from_bytes("some string");

Wrapper functions can be stated as so: (Thank you ArmanSchwarz for your comment)

wstring s2ws(const std::string& str)
{
    typedef std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t> convert_typeX;
    std::wstring_convert<convert_typeX, wchar_t> converterX;

    return converterX.from_bytes(str);
}

string ws2s(const std::wstring& wstr)
{
    typedef std::codecvt_utf8<wchar_t> convert_typeX;
    std::wstring_convert<convert_typeX, wchar_t> converterX;

    return converterX.to_bytes(wstr);
}

Note: there's some controversy on whether strings/wstring should be passed in to functions as references or as literals (due to c++11 and compiler updates); I'll leave the decision to the person implementing, but it's worth knowing.

Note: I'm using std::codecvt_utf8 in the above code, but if you're not using utf-8 you'll need to change that to the appropriate encoding you're using:

http://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/codecvt

share|improve this answer
4  
Please +1: this is the official C++ standard way to do string conversion. You can also use from_bytes to convert the other way. Because I personally like one-liners, here is my version: std::wstring str = std::wstring_convert<std::codecvt_utf<wchar_t>>().from_bytes("some string"); –  Guss Nov 11 '13 at 12:59
1  
2 weeks I spent using giant dodgy templated monstrosities before I came across this. Thank you. Please consider wrapping in a simple std::string ws2s(std::wstring const&) function, might get more up-votes that way. –  quant Nov 13 '13 at 6:05
1  
it worked for me!!! –  richardtk_1 Jul 19 at 19:34
    
Looks like en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/header/codecvt isn't available as of g++ 4.8.2. The two s2ws and ws2s methods do not currently work under linux –  Begui Sep 10 at 11:34

Solution from: http://forums.devshed.com/c-programming-42/wstring-to-string-444006.html

std::wstring wide( L"Wide" ); 
std::string str( wide.begin(), wide.end() );

// Will print no problemo!
std::cout << str << std::endl;
share|improve this answer
1  
Bizarrely, this works on Visual Studio 10. What is going on? This should cause a truncating assigment from wchar_t to char for all elements of the original string. –  Pedro Lamarão Jan 4 '13 at 17:41
1  
it doesn't work on GCC, MacOS. –  JavaRunner May 31 '13 at 21:02
2  
...when it goes to any non-latin characters. –  JavaRunner May 31 '13 at 21:14
3  
@PedroLamarão: values 0-127 are identical in virtually every encoding, so truncating values that are all less than 127 results in the same text. Put in a chinese character and you'll see the failure. –  Mooing Duck Sep 4 '13 at 20:20
1  
@PedroLamarão: the values 128-255 of windows codepage 1252 (the Windows English default) and the values 128-255 of unicode are mostly the same, so if that's teh codepage you're using most of those characters should be truncated to the correct values. (I totally expected á and õ to work, I know our code at work relies on this for é, which I will soon fix) –  Mooing Duck Sep 5 '13 at 16:30

Instead of including locale and all that fancy stuff, if you know for FACT your string is convertible just do this:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
  wstring w(L"bla");
  string result;
  for(char x : w)
    result += x;

  cout << result << '\n';
}

Live example here

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 because it's a simple solution that works for some scenarios (for a loose definition of "works", I might add). –  Jaime Pardos Aug 14 '12 at 9:43
    
Almost the same thing as namar0x0309's solution, which is much more elegant IMHO. But that's just me. –  onitake Jun 17 '13 at 13:57
    
I spiffied up your code to actually work with minimal modification ;-) –  rubenvb Aug 22 '13 at 8:05
2  
-1 If you have a wstring, it's likely you're dealing with multibyte characters. If you could know the string is trivially convertible, you wouldn't be handling a wstring in the first place. More likely, you're dealing with another library that expects you to handle the wstring properly. Truncating the wchars is just begging for a hard to trace bug later on. Also, you should use "string result( w.begin(), w.end() );" if you were going to do it, to avoid a loop that could trigger many reallocations. –  Kian May 22 at 19:35

This is not the answer to the question at hand, but may be of use to people that did a SO search on "convert string wstring" and landed here.

Here's a way to combining string, wstring and mixed string constants to wstring. Use the wstringstream class.

#include <sstream>

std::string narrow = "narrow";
std::wstring wide = "wide";

std::wstringstream cls;
cls << " abc " << narrow.c_str() << L" def " << wide.c_str();
std::wstring total= cls.str();
share|improve this answer
8  
This is not a wstring to string conversion –  aoeu Sep 6 '12 at 12:09
1  
@Michael Can you please explain? What about this is incorrect? Your comment is not helpful without more details. –  Nate Oct 3 '12 at 20:48
6  
@Nate - The question was to convert wstring to string. What is shown here is to convert wstring + string to wstring. –  GuruM Oct 17 '12 at 7:25

I believe the official way is still to go thorugh codecvt facets (you need some sort of locale-aware translation), as in

resultCode = use_facet<codecvt<char, wchar_t, ConversionState> >(locale).
  in(stateVar, scratchbuffer, scratchbufferEnd, from, to, toLimit, curPtr);

or something like that, I don't have working code lying around. But I'm not sure how many people these days use that machinery and how many simply ask for pointers to memory and let ICU or some other library handle the gory details.

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the ICU, here's the link: site.icu-project.org –  John Holecek Jan 26 '11 at 13:14

You might as well just use the ctype facet's narrow method directly:

#include <clocale>
#include <locale>
#include <string>
#include <vector>

inline std::string narrow(std::wstring const& text)
{
    std::locale const loc("");
    wchar_t const* from = text.c_str();
    std::size_t const len = text.size();
    std::vector<char> buffer(len + 1);
    std::use_facet<std::ctype<wchar_t> >(loc).narrow(from, from + len, '_', &buffer[0]);
    return std::string(&buffer[0], &buffer[len]);
}
share|improve this answer

There are two issues with the code:

  1. The conversion in const std::string s( ws.begin(), ws.end() ); is not required to correctly map the wide characters to their narrow counterpart. Most likely, each wide character will just be typecast to char.
    The resolution to this problem is already given in the answer by kem and involves the narrow function of the locale's ctype facet.

  2. You are writing output to both std::cout and std::wcout in the same program. Both cout and wcout are associated with the same stream (stdout) and the results of using the same stream both as a byte-oriented stream (as cout does) and a wide-oriented stream (as wcout does) are not defined.
    The best option is to avoid mixing narrow and wide output to the same (underlying) stream. For stdout/cout/wcout, you can try switching the orientation of stdout when switching between wide and narrow output (or vice versa):

    #include <iostream>
    #include <stdio.h>
    #include <wchar.h>
    
    int main() {
        std::cout << "narrow" << std::endl;
        fwide(stdout, 1); // switch to wide
        std::wcout << L"wide" << std::endl;
        fwide(stdout, -1); // switch to narrow
        std::cout << "narrow" << std::endl;
        fwide(stdout, 1); // switch to wide
        std::wcout << L"wide" << std::endl;
    }
    
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, that fixes the problem with using cout and wcout. –  BЈовић Jan 26 '11 at 16:21

In my case, I have to use multibyte character (MBCS), and I want to use std::string and std::wstring. And can't use c++11. So I use mbstowcs and wcstombs.

I make same function with using new, delete [], but it is slower then this.

This can help How to: Convert Between Various String Types

EDIT

However, in case of converting to wstring and source string is no alphabet and multi byte string, it's not working. So I change wcstombs to WideCharToMultiByte.

#include <string>

std::wstring get_wstr_from_sz(const char* psz)
{
    //I think it's enough to my case
    wchar_t buf[0x400];
    wchar_t *pbuf = buf;
    size_t len = strlen(psz) + 1;

    if (len >= sizeof(buf) / sizeof(wchar_t))
    {
        pbuf = L"error";
    }
    else
    {
        size_t converted;
        mbstowcs_s(&converted, buf, psz, _TRUNCATE);
    }

    return std::wstring(pbuf);
}

std::string get_string_from_wsz(const wchar_t* pwsz)
{
    char buf[0x400];
    char *pbuf = buf;
    size_t len = wcslen(pwsz)*2 + 1;

    if (len >= sizeof(buf))
    {
        pbuf = "error";
    }
    else
    {
        size_t converted;
        wcstombs_s(&converted, buf, pwsz, _TRUNCATE);
    }

    return std::string(pbuf);
}

EDIT to use 'MultiByteToWideChar' instead of 'wcstombs'

#include <Windows.h>
#include <boost/shared_ptr.hpp>
#include "string_util.h"

std::wstring get_wstring_from_sz(const char* psz)
{
    int res;
    wchar_t buf[0x400];
    wchar_t *pbuf = buf;
    boost::shared_ptr<wchar_t[]> shared_pbuf;

    res = MultiByteToWideChar(CP_ACP, 0, psz, -1, buf, sizeof(buf)/sizeof(wchar_t));

    if (0 == res && GetLastError() == ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER)
    {
        res = MultiByteToWideChar(CP_ACP, 0, psz, -1, NULL, 0);

        shared_pbuf = boost::shared_ptr<wchar_t[]>(new wchar_t[res]);

        pbuf = shared_pbuf.get();

        res = MultiByteToWideChar(CP_ACP, 0, psz, -1, pbuf, res);
    }
    else if (0 == res)
    {
        pbuf = L"error";
    }

    return std::wstring(pbuf);
}

std::string get_string_from_wcs(const wchar_t* pcs)
{
    int res;
    char buf[0x400];
    char* pbuf = buf;
    boost::shared_ptr<char[]> shared_pbuf;

    res = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_ACP, 0, pcs, -1, buf, sizeof(buf), NULL, NULL);

    if (0 == res && GetLastError() == ERROR_INSUFFICIENT_BUFFER)
    {
        res = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_ACP, 0, pcs, -1, NULL, 0, NULL, NULL);

        shared_pbuf = boost::shared_ptr<char[]>(new char[res]);

        pbuf = shared_pbuf.get();

        res = WideCharToMultiByte(CP_ACP, 0, pcs, -1, pbuf, res, NULL, NULL);
    }
    else if (0 == res)
    {
        pbuf = "error";
    }

    return std::string(pbuf);
}
share|improve this answer
// Embarcadero C++ Builder 

// convertion string to wstring
string str1 = "hello";
String str2 = str1;         // typedef UnicodeString String;   -> str2 contains now u"hello";

// convertion wstring to string
String str2 = u"hello";
string str1 = UTF8string(str2).c_str();   // -> str1 contains now "hello"
share|improve this answer
2  
please explain what ure doing there in your answer, else it may get deletet –  Felix Lahmer Nov 11 at 12:32

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