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I have the page structure as:

<div class="parent">
    <div class="child-left floatLeft">
    </div>

    <div class="child-right floatLeft">
    </div>
</div>

Now, the child-left DIV will have more content, so the parent DIV's height increases as per the child DIV.

But the problem is child-right height is not increasing. How can I make its height as equal to it's parent?

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just FYI you wrote both div with floatLeft, the second should be floatRight –  dynamic Nov 20 '12 at 23:23
30  
@llnk: um, no it shouldn't. –  Mike Dec 14 '12 at 16:29
1  
depending on context either is okay –  Steve Obbayi Jan 12 at 19:16
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9 Answers

up vote 123 down vote accepted

for the parent element add the following properties

.parent {
    overflow: hidden;
    position: relative;
    width: 100%;
}

then for .child-right these:

.child-right {
    background:green;
    height: 100%;
    position: absolute;
    right: 0;}

The result will be this: http://jsbin.com/arere4

In case that you need a three columns you can use this: http://jsbin.com/otagem/edit

You can find more information about equal height colums at http://matthewjamestaylor.com/blog/equal-height-columns-cross-browser-css-no-hacks

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2  
Your CSS results in undefined behavior - the parent's height depends on the childrens height, but the children have a percentage height defined in terms of the parent: this is invalid, and will likely not work in a cross-browser way. –  Eamon Nerbonne Jan 26 '11 at 14:03
    
I see you're not floating everything - so that's defined at the cost of not scaling if ever the right column grows longer than the left (which indeed is not the case in the OP's question). –  Eamon Nerbonne Jan 26 '11 at 14:08
2  
Yes, you need to add this: padding-bottom: 32768px; margin-bottom: -32768px; to the children. –  Michael Jan 26 '11 at 14:09
2  
This works as long as the right column is guaranteed to have fewer content then the left or else it will be clipped. Also I edited the answer to omit the useless declarations. –  Christoph May 30 '12 at 11:50
2  
@MatthewBlackford: it's a "hack" in that it prevent margin collapsing. You could prevent margin collapsing in other ways, such as using a 1px transparent border, but in essence, but the important thing here is that you avoid margin collapse. I wouldn't use this solution except as a last resort since it causes weird layout errors and unexpected cropping (or superimposed content) when your assumptions turn out to be faulty. In short: you don't want to do this unless you really need to. –  Eamon Nerbonne Feb 15 '13 at 15:32
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The simplest, most extensible way to do this is to use a table. You're dealing with columns; divs + floats simply aren't the best way to do that (not to mention the fact that multiple levels of nested divs just to hack around css limitations is hardly more "semantic" than just using a simple table).

If you do not wish to use the table element, consider css display: table (unsupported by IE7 and older)

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/emn13/7FFp3/

Relevant css:

.parent { display: table; }
.parent > div {display: table-cell; width:50%; }
/*omit width:50% for auto-scaled column widths*/

This approach is far more robust than using overflow:hidden with floats. You can add pretty much any number of columns; have them auto-scale if you want; and avoid complex hard to understand CSS. Also, the float solution requires that you know beforehand which column is longest as everything else is cut to that length.

KISS: don't use float hacks unless you specifically need to. If IE7 is an issue, I'd still pick a plain table with semantic columns over a hard-to-maintain, less flexible trick-CSS solution any day.

Another alternative is to use display:inline block; for example: http://jsbin.com/ovuqes/2/edit

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1  
Good one, but it's worth to note that you're unable to use margins between these cells (and padding won't help if you want them styled). –  Wordpressor Nov 17 '12 at 15:06
2  
border-spacing:10px; on the table element will introduce margin-like spacing. Alternatively, you could add extra (empty) columns where you want extra space. And you could also add padding inside the table-cells; that padding will be included in the background however, so that may not be what you want. But you're right that it's not quite as flexible as a normal margin. And you can't position anything relative to the columns, which may be a problem. –  Eamon Nerbonne Nov 20 '12 at 16:03
1  
So it's better a table-less layout or not ? –  dynamic Nov 20 '12 at 23:25
2  
I have to say: I agree to you that in this case a simple table is more than enough. The problem is that there is a common view to disregard every layout with table –  dynamic Nov 21 '12 at 11:38
1  
The problem with table is that when the screen is resized to a smaller width (responsive design) the table cells get squished instead of tiling one over the top of the next one. The second method with padding-bottom: 32768px; margin-bottom: -32768px; is quite amazing and does almost exactly what I needed...thanks for that one...border bottom is an issue though... –  Serj Sagan Feb 5 at 5:51
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Does the parent have a height? If you set the parents height like so.

div.parent { height: 300px };

Then you can make the child stretch to the full height like this.

div.child-right { height: 100% };

EDIT

Here is how you would do it using JavaScript.

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parent does not have a fixed height. It is expanding as per the child-left height. –  Veera Jan 26 '11 at 12:40
    
Ah, I thought as much, then you are going to need some JavaScript, I will append it in a second. –  Olical Jan 26 '11 at 12:41
    
@Veera See my edit for a JavaScript version –  Olical Jan 26 '11 at 12:48
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Please set parent div to overflow: hidden
then in child divs you can set a large amount for padding-bottom. for example
padding-bottom: 5000px
then margin-bottom: -5000px
and then all child divs will be the height of the parent.
Of course this wont work if you are trying to put content in the parent div (outside of other divs that is)

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/Tareqdhk/DAFEC/

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seems a bit dirty, but worked for me - the only solution on this question. I tried this using twitter bootstrap. –  honestor Jan 26 '13 at 0:16
    
This is an odd hacky solution but IT WORKS! Thx –  Nox Jun 28 '13 at 17:51
    
works, but border bottom needs creative approach... –  Serj Sagan Feb 5 at 5:57
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I found a lot of answers, but probably the best solution for me is

.parent { 
  overflow: hidden; 
}
.parent .floatLeft {
  # your other styles
  float: left;
  margin-bottom: -99999px;
  padding-bottom: 99999px;
}

You can check other solutions here http://css-tricks.com/fluid-width-equal-height-columns/

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I have recently done this on my website using jQuery. The code calculates the height of the tallest div and sets the other divs to the same height. Here's the technique:

http://www.broken-links.com/2009/01/20/very-quick-equal-height-columns-in-jquery/

I don't believe height:100% will work, so if you don't explicitly know the div heights I don't think there is a pure CSS solution.

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I answered a similar question here:

Major problem with 100% height div

You're trying to make the parent's height dependent on the children's height and children's height dependent on parent's height. Won't compute. CSS Faux columns is the best solution. There's more than one way of doing that. I'd rather not use JavaScript.

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For the parent:

display: flex;

For childs:

align-items: stretch;

You should add some prefixes, check caniuse.

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I used this for a comment section:

   .parent {
        display: flex;
        float: left;
        border-top:2px solid black;
        width:635px;
        margin:10px 0px 0px 0px;
        padding:0px 20px 0px 20px;
        background-color: rgba(255,255,255,0.5);
    }


.child-left {
    align-items: stretch;
    float: left;
    width:135px;
    padding:10px 10px 10px 0px;
    height:inherit;
    border-right:2px solid black;
}

.child-right {
    align-items: stretch;
    float: left;
    width:468px;
    padding:10px;
}

You could float the child-right to the right, but in this case I've calculated the widths of each div precisely.

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