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I have written my codes and i want to validate it in such a way thet it will only allow intergers to be inputed and not alphabets. Here is the code, please I will love you to help me. Thanks.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace minimum
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            int a = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            int b = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());
            int c = Convert.ToInt32(Console.ReadLine());

            if (a < b)
            {
                if (a < c)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(a + "is the minimum number");
                }
            }
            if (b < a)
            {
                if (b < c)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(b + "is the minimum number");
                }
            }
            if (c < a)
            {
                if (c < b)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine(c + "is the minimum number");
                }
            }


            Console.ReadLine();
        }
    }
}
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3  
Don't shout please.... –  BvdVen Jan 26 '11 at 13:17
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6 Answers

You should test if it's an int instead of converting in right away. Try something like :

string line = Console.ReadLine();
int value;
if (int.TryParse(line, out value))
{
   // this is an int
   // do you minimum number check here
}
else
{
   // this is not an int
}
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To get the console to filter out alphabetical keystrokes you have to take over input parsing. The Console.ReadKey() method is fundamental to this, it lets you sniff the pressed key. Here's a sample implementation:

    static string ReadNumber() {
        var buf = new StringBuilder();
        for (; ; ) {
            var key = Console.ReadKey(true);
            if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter && buf.Length > 0) {
                return buf.ToString() ;
            }
            else if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && buf.Length > 0) {
                buf.Remove(buf.Length-1, 1);
                Console.Write("\b \b");
            }
            else if ("0123456789.-".Contains(key.KeyChar)) {
                buf.Append(key.KeyChar);
                Console.Write(key.KeyChar);
            }
            else {
                Console.Beep();
            }
        }
    }

You could add, say, Decimal.TryParse() in the if() statement that detects the Enter key to verify that the entered string is still a valid number. That way you can reject input like "1-2".

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1  
+1 But you should probably validate for modifiers :-) (Ctrl, Alt...) –  xanatos Sep 11 '11 at 16:21
1  
That's true. Let's call it a feature :) –  Hans Passant Sep 11 '11 at 16:30
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Simply call Readline() and loop with Int.TryParse until the user inputs a valid number :)

int X;

String Result = Console.ReadLine();

while(!Int32.TryParse(Result, out X))
{
   Console.WriteLine("Not a valid number, try again.");

   Result = Console.ReadLine();
}

Hope that helps

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Do not Convert the input from the user immediately. Put it in a string and use Int32.TryParse(...) to find out whether or not a number was entered. Like this:

int i;
string input = Console.ReadLine();
if(Int32.TryParse(input, out i))
{
    // it is a number and it is stored in i
}
else
{
    // it is not a number
}
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WOW is that a record having all these solutions thrown in at the same time? Should we delete them? –  Erno de Weerd Jan 26 '11 at 13:23
1  
no way, enjoy our smart and fast community :) –  Pieter888 Jan 26 '11 at 13:27
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Note that

if (a < b) {
    if (a < c) {

is equivalent to

if (a < b && a < c) {

and that this latter form introduces less nesting and is more readable, particularly if your code grows more complex. Also, you should probably never use Convert.ToInt32 - it has a particularly ill-conceived and surprising corner case; and it's also less type-safe than int.Parse which is the superior choice where possible - or int.TryParse when you're unsure whether the string is valid. Basically, avoid Convert.... wherever possible.

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My preferred solution would be:

static void Main()
{
    Console.WriteLine(
        (
            from line in Generate(()=>Console.ReadLine()).Take(3)
            let val = ParseAsInt(line)
            where val.HasValue
            select val.Value
        ).Min()
    );
}
static IEnumerable<T> Generate<T>(Func<T> generator) { 
   while(true) yield return generator(); 
}
static int? ParseAsInt(string str) {
   int retval; 
   return int.TryParse(str,out retval) ? retval : default(int?); 
}

Of course, depending on the specification (should invalid number be retried?), it may need to be tweaked.

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Looks like puzzle :) –  Sergey Berezovskiy Jan 26 '11 at 14:35
    
The code? a puzzle? hmm, that's not good :-) - I intended to make the functionality compositional and avoid large functions - I suppose the generate function takes a little getting used to... –  Eamon Nerbonne Jan 27 '11 at 8:22
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