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I am using the matplotlib to create the plots. I have to identify each plot with a different colour which should be automatically generated by Python. Can you please give me a method to put different colors for different plots in the same figure?

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2 Answers 2

Matplotlib does this by default.

E.g.:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.arange(10)

plt.plot(x, x)
plt.plot(x, 2 * x)
plt.plot(x, 3 * x)
plt.plot(x, 4 * x)
plt.show()

Basic plot demonstrating color cycling

And, as you may already know, you can easily add a legend:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.arange(10)

plt.plot(x, x)
plt.plot(x, 2 * x)
plt.plot(x, 3 * x)
plt.plot(x, 4 * x)

plt.legend(['y = x', 'y = 2x', 'y = 3x', 'y = 4x'], loc='upper left')

plt.show()

Basic plot with legend

If you want to control the colors that will be cycled through:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

x = np.arange(10)

plt.gca().set_color_cycle(['red', 'green', 'blue', 'yellow'])

plt.plot(x, x)
plt.plot(x, 2 * x)
plt.plot(x, 3 * x)
plt.plot(x, 4 * x)

plt.legend(['y = x', 'y = 2x', 'y = 3x', 'y = 4x'], loc='upper left')

plt.show()

Plot showing control over default color cycling

Hope that helps a bit! If you're unfamiliar with matplotlib, the tutorial is a good place to start.

Edit:

First off, if you have a lot (>5) of things you want to plot on one figure, either:

  1. Put them on different plots (consider using a few subplots on one figure), or
  2. Use something other than color (i.e. marker styles or line thickness) to distinguish between them.

Otherwise, you're going to wind up with a very messy plot! Be nice to who ever is going to read whatever you're doing and don't try to cram 15 different things onto one figure!!

Beyond that, many people are colorblind to varying degrees, and distinguishing between numerous subtly different colors is difficult for more people than you may realize.

That having been said, if you really want to put 20 lines on one axis with 20 relatively distinct colors, here's one way to do it:

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
import numpy as np

num_plots = 20

# Have a look at the colormaps here and decide which one you'd like:
# http://matplotlib.org/1.2.1/examples/pylab_examples/show_colormaps.html
colormap = plt.cm.gist_ncar
plt.gca().set_color_cycle([colormap(i) for i in np.linspace(0, 0.9, num_plots)])

# Plot several different functions...
x = np.arange(10)
labels = []
for i in range(1, num_plots + 1):
    plt.plot(x, i * x + 5 * i)
    labels.append(r'$y = %ix + %i$' % (i, 5*i))

# I'm basically just demonstrating several different legend options here...
plt.legend(labels, ncol=4, loc='upper center', 
           bbox_to_anchor=[0.5, 1.1], 
           columnspacing=1.0, labelspacing=0.0,
           handletextpad=0.0, handlelength=1.5,
           fancybox=True, shadow=True)

plt.show()

Unique colors for 20 lines based on a given colormap

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Thanks Joe for the answer. But can I request you to suggest a method where I have to plot more than 15 plots in a single figure, each with a distinct color and marker? can you pls suggest a solution for this situation. Thanks Gopi –  pottigopi Jan 26 '11 at 17:57
    
@pottigopi - See the example at the bottom... However, as I mentioned there, it's impossible to come up with 15 or 20 colors that are clearly distinguishable from each other at a glance... You might think about splitting your figures up a bit more so that you don't have so many things on a single axis. Hope it helps, at any rate! –  Joe Kington Jan 26 '11 at 19:30
    
I am posting an answer that some may prefer to your last post. –  Tommy Oct 17 '13 at 21:17
1  
Legends could similarly be handled with the more concise and robust plot(x, y, label='my data') and pyplot.legend(loc=…), right? –  EOL Oct 17 '13 at 21:42
    
@EOL - Yes, absolutely. I have no idea why I didn't do it that way! –  Joe Kington Oct 18 '13 at 1:12
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I would like to offer a minor improvement on the last loop answer given in the previous post (that post is correct and should still be accepted). The implicit assumption made when labeling the last example is that plt.label(LIST) puts label number X in LIST with the line corresponding to the Xth time plot was called. I have run into problems with this approach before. The recommended way to build legends and customize their labels per matplotlibs documentation ( http://matplotlib.org/users/legend_guide.html#adjusting-the-order-of-legend-item) is to have a warm feeling that the labels go along with the exact plots you think they do:

...
# Plot several different functions...
labels = []
plotHandles = []
for i in range(1, num_plots + 1):
    x, = plt.plot(some x vector, some y vector) #need the ',' per ** below
    plotHandles.append(x)
    labels.append(some label)
plt.legend(plotHandles, labels, 'upper left',ncol=1)

**: Matplotlib Legends not working

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Just fyi: you can also use the "label" kwarg to plot and then call legend without any arguments. –  Joe Kington Oct 18 '13 at 1:23
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