Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I get in my function message array of bytes and type of object, I need to restore object from bytes. Is there in Java any cast like in C++ ?

share|improve this question
up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, you can use serialization instead.

share|improve this answer
    
Link broken now. – Hubbitus Sep 15 '15 at 9:38
1  
Thanks @Hubbitus. I've changed to another link which also explains serialization. – vitaut Sep 15 '15 at 14:47

There is no way in Java to have an arbitrary block of bytes and then tell the compiler "you need to treat this as an object of type X".

How were those bytes that you want to "restore into an object" created in the first place?

Java has a serialization mechanism to convert objects to a stream of bytes and vice versa.

share|improve this answer

I'm not exactly sure what you're asking here, but each object in Java (and this includes arrays) has runtime type information associated with it. So when you cast an object to a different type, an exception is thrown right away if the new type doesn't match. This is very different from C/C++ where you can just tell the compiler to treat a block of memory as whatever object you want it to be.

If you're looking for code to convert an arbitrary set of bytes into an object or vice-versa you'll need to do it a different way, either using the built-in serialization facilities or else rolling your own conversion code.

share|improve this answer

No, you need to serialize your object. http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/Programming/serialization/

This may not be useful if your object data is expected to be readable in other languages.

share|improve this answer
    
Link broken now. – Hubbitus Sep 15 '15 at 9:38

here are the methods to accomplish what you want.

public static Object toObjectFromByteArray(byte[] byteArr) {
        if (byteArr == null) {
            return null;
        }

        Object resultObj = null;
        ByteArrayInputStream bin = null;
        ObjectInputStream ooin = null;
        try {
            bin = new ByteArrayInputStream(byteArr);
            ooin = new ObjectInputStream(bin);
            resultObj = ooin.readObject();
        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException(ex);
        }
        finally {
            try {
                if (ooin != null) {
                    ooin.close();
                }
                if (bin != null) {
                    bin.close();
                }
            }
            catch (IOException ex1) {
                ex1.printStackTrace();
            }

        }
        return resultObj;
    }

    public static byte[] toByteArray(Object obj) {
        ByteArrayOutputStream barr = null;
        ObjectOutputStream oout = null;
        byte[] bytearr = null;
        try {
            byte[] b2 = null;
            barr = new ByteArrayOutputStream(10000);
            oout = new ObjectOutputStream(barr);
            oout.writeObject(obj);
            oout.flush();
            oout.close();
            bytearr = barr.toByteArray();

        }
        catch (Exception ex) {
            throw new RuntimeException(ex);
        }
        finally {
            try {
                if (oout != null) {
                    oout.close();
                }
                if (barr != null) {
                    barr.close();
                }
            }
            catch (IOException ex1) {
                ex1.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
        return bytearr;
    }
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.