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I need to quickly produce some functions which will allow me to store and retrieve some date ranges. Then evaluate the dates based on todays date, then add them to an array.

I'm not exactly sure how many ranges I'll need to keep.

Perhaps you've seen a similar example of this I can use for reference ?

EDIT. I need to save them for use when the app is next run too.

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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can represent a date range in two ways:

  • start date + end date
  • start date + duration

You can then represent a date as an NSDate instance, as a double (or, if you desperately need to save memory, as an int, like UNIX timestamp). I'd make a class for that.

@interface DateRange : NSObject <NSCoding>
{
    NSTimeInterval start, end;
}
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSDate* startDate;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSDate* endDate;
@property (nonatomic, assign) NSTimeInterval duration;
- (BOOL) containsDate: (NSDate *) date;
@end

@implementation DateRange

- (NSDate *) startDate
{
    return [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceReferenceDate: start];
}

- (void) setStartDate: (NSDate *) date
{
    start = [date timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];
}

- (NSDate *) endDate
{
    return [NSDate dateWithTimeIntervalSinceReferenceDate: end];
}

- (void) setEndDate: (NSDate *) date
{
    end = [date timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];
}

- (NSTimeInterval) duration
{
    return end - start;
}

- (void) setDuration: (NSTimeInterval) newDuration
{
    end = start + newDuration;
}

- (BOOL) containsDate: (NSDate *) date
{
    NSTimeInterval d = [date timeIntervalSinceReferenceDate];
    return d > start && d < end;
}

- (id) initWithCoder: (NSCoder *) coder
{
    if ( ( self = [super init] ) ) {
        start = [coder decodeDoubleForKey: @"start"];
        end = [coder decodeDoubleForKey: @"end"];
    }
    return self;
}

- (void) encodeWithCoder: (NSCoder *) coder
{
    [coder encodeDouble: start forKey: @"start"];
    [coder encodeDouble: end forKey: @"end"];
}

- (BOOL) isEqual: (id) dateRange
{
    if ( [self class] != [dateRange class] )
        return NO;
    return [self.startDate isEqualToDate: ((DateRange *)dateRange).startDate] && [self.endDate isEqualToDate: ((DateRange *)dateRange).endDate];
}

- (NSInteger) hash
{
    return (NSInteger) (end - start);
}

@end

The bonus point is that you can store as many ranges in Cocoa collections (such as NSArray) as needed. I leave a better implementation of -isEqual: and -hash as an exercise to you, dear reader.

To save a DateRange object in NSUserDefaults:

NSData *dateRangeArchive = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject: dateRange];
[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject: dateRangeArchive forKey: myKey];

To read a DateRange object from NSUserDefaults:

DateRange *dr = [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData: [[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] dataForKey: myKey]]; // returns an autoreleased DateRange object

Similarly, if you need to store an NSArray of DateRanges, you can either archive the whole array or create an array of archived DateRanges (the former should be faster):

NSData *dateRangeArchive = [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject: arrayOfDateRanges];
[[NSUserDefaults standardUserDefaults] setObject: dateRangeArchive forKey: myKey];

If you think that's too much repetitive code for your project, you can extend NSUserDefaults like this:

@interface NSUserDefaults (MyExtensions)
- (DateRange *) dateRangeForKey: (NSString *) defaultName;
- (void) setDateRange: (DateRange *) dateRange forKey: (NSString *) defaultName;
@end

@implementation NSUserDefaults (MyExtensions)

- (DateRange *) dateRangeForKey: (NSString *) defaultName
{
    return [NSKeyedUnarchiver unarchiveObjectWithData: [self dataForKey: defaultName]];
}

- (void) setDateRange: (DateRange *) dateRange forKey: (NSString *) defaultName
{
    [self setObject: [NSKeyedArchiver archivedDataWithRootObject: dateRange] forKey: defaultName];
}

@end
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And is there an easy way to save these (see my edit, wasn't clear when i said save) perhaps in NSUserDefaults ? –  Jules Jan 26 '11 at 15:03
    
Sure. Since the class implements NSCoding protocol, you can use NSKeyedArchiver/NSKeyedUnarchiver to "transform" DateRange objects into/from NSData representation, which can be stored both in NSUserDefaults and in property lists. –  Costique Jan 26 '11 at 16:30
    
If that another question is an extension (or closely related) to the original question, ask here, I will expand my answer as necessary. If you think it needs more eyeballs, you'd better ask it as a separate question. After all, asking questions is free on Stack Overflow :) –  Costique Jan 26 '11 at 18:41
    
Ideally, I'd like to see how you implement NSKeyedArchiver / NSKeyedUnarchiver with NSUserDefaults and dates –  Jules Jan 26 '11 at 20:02
    
I updated my answer with more sample code. I hope it helps. –  Costique Jan 26 '11 at 20:43
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You might look at this question for an example of checking if an NSDate falls between two other NSDate's. I would suggest creating a "MyDateRange" class with "beginDate" and "endDate" properties and a -containsDate: method.

If you don't know how many ranges you'll need to keep, an NSMutableArray might be a good way to store them, because it grows as needed when you add objects.

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I need to save them for use when the app is next run too. –  Jules Jan 26 '11 at 14:36
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