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I need to generate permutations from multiple ranges of numbers in array.

using namespace std;

int generatePermutations(vector<int> &myVector, vector<vector<int> > &swappable) {
    int i = 0, s = 0;
    for (s = 0; s < swappable.size(); s++) {
        do {
            for (i = 0; i < myVector.size(); i++) {
                printf("%i ", myVector[i]);
            }
            printf("\n");
            swappable.pop_back();
            generatePermutations(myVector, swappable);
        } while (next_permutation(myVector.begin()+swappable[s][0],
                myVector.begin()+swappable[s][1]));
    }
}

int main() {
    vector<int> myArray;
    myArray.resize(6);
    myArray[0] = 0;
    myArray[1] = 1;
    myArray[2] = 2;
    myArray[3] = 3;
    myArray[4] = 4;
    myArray[5] = 5;

    // Swappable positions (0 - first, 1 - last)
    vector<vector<int> > swappable;
    swappable.resize(2);
    swappable[0].resize(2);
    swappable[0][0] = 1; swappable[0][1] = 3;
    swappable[1].resize(2);
    swappable[1][0] = 4; swappable[1][1] = 6;
    generatePermutations(myArray, swappable);

    return 0;
}

The example above should generate something like this:

0 1 2 3 4 5
0 2 1 3 4 5
0 1 2 3 5 4
0 2 1 3 5 4

But it generates this:

0 1 2 3 4 5
0 1 2 3 4 5
share|improve this question
    
What is swappable for? Why are there no comments in your code? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 26 '11 at 14:07
    
Comment added. swappable is for holding first and last positions, between them i need to generate permutations. –  Radek Simko Jan 26 '11 at 14:17
    
Ok. Have you tried stepping through your code in a debugger to see why it always gives the same result? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jan 26 '11 at 14:19
    
I am very confused by this. I do not understand what you are trying to do, and I fail to see the pattern in the example you provide. Can you please elaborate? –  Björn Pollex Jan 26 '11 at 14:25
    
I'm surprised it generated anything at all, your algorithm does not make sense, you are calling pop_back() on the swappable vector, which means after the first recursive call, it contains nothing, and the while loop will access invalid items... –  Nim Jan 26 '11 at 14:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I take it swappable is a set of ranges which may be swapped? So [[1, 3], [4, 6]] means anything in [1, 3) (indexes 1 and 2) can be swapped around in that range, and similarly for [4, 6)? Is it also true that the ranges will never overlap?

How does this look:

typedef vector<vector<int> >::const_iterator SwappableIter;
void generatePermutations(vector<int> &data,
                          SwappableIter begin, SwappableIter end)
{
  if (begin == end) {
    print(data);
  }
  else {
    vector<int>::iterator start = data.begin() + (*begin)[0],
      stop = data.begin() + (*begin)[1];
    sort(start, stop);
    do {
      generatePermutations(data, begin + 1, end);
    } while (next_permutation(start, stop));
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, ranges will never overlap. –  Radek Simko Jan 26 '11 at 14:36
1  
If swappable is supposed to be a vector of ranges, use an std::pair or a custom struct rather then a nested vector. –  Björn Pollex Jan 26 '11 at 14:41
    
Yes, a pair would be better; I kept the type from the question for my example. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 14:44

You have created a seemingly correct iterative solution for the problem, but in each iteration, you remove an element from the swappable vector and make a recursive call.
As both myVector and swappable are passed by non-const reference, these recursive calls destroy the contents of the swappable vector before you are actually generating permutations.

Just remove the lines

swappable.pop_back();
generatePermutations(myVector, swappable);

and the code should start to work.

share|improve this answer
    
The code in the question, after removing the two lines you mention, does not work. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 14:43
    
@Fred Nurk: Care to explain in what way it fails to work? Or do you mean the missing #include statements? When executing the code with the required #includes added and the lines I mentioned commented out, I get a result that is similar to what @Radek listed as expected. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 31 '11 at 11:26
    
See ideone.com/4GHv0. Note the UB due to the last warning, how the four output lines have one line duplicated, and how one line is missing from the expected output. (And BTW, it wasn't my downvote; I don't downvote.) –  Fred Nurk Jan 31 '11 at 11:31
    
@Fred: Fair enough. But it is hard to match the listed output exactly (you also did not do that), given that on the last line the 1 is replaced by a 2. –  Bart van Ingen Schenau Jan 31 '11 at 12:18
    
You're right, it has a typo. –  Fred Nurk Jan 31 '11 at 12:28

Here is a slightly modified version of your generation algorithm (which is broken).

int generatePermutations(vector<int> &myVector, vector<vector<int> >& swappable) {
  do
  {
    do
    {
      print(myVector);
      // generate permutations of the second segment
    } while(next_permutation(myVector.begin() + swappable[1][0], myVector.begin() + swappable[1][1]));

    // re-sort the second segment
    sort(myVector.begin() + swappable[1][0], myVector.begin() + swappable[1][1]);

    // calculate permutation of first segment
  } while(next_permutation(myVector.begin() + swappable[0][0], myVector.begin() + swappable[0][1]));
}

EDIT: fixed now to generate the combinations, but only works for two ranges, Fred's solution above is more scalable..

share|improve this answer
    
This does not scale well; e.g. when swappable.size() == 10. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 14:38
    
@Fred, true.... –  Nim Jan 26 '11 at 14:45
    
This also doesn't work. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 14:48
    
@Fred, erm that would be because you've set the ranges up incorrectly rather than anything wrong with the above function! –  Nim Jan 26 '11 at 17:18
    
@Nim: How have they been setup incorrectly? That's been copied directly from the way they are setup in the question. Did you also notice the compiler warning? –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 17:25

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