Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have array of objects person ( int age; String name;).

How to sort this array that persons are going alphabetically sorted , then by age ?

Which algorithm is for this ?

share|improve this question

8 Answers 8

up vote 33 down vote accepted

You can use Collections.sort as follows:

private static void order(List<Person> persons) {

    Collections.sort(persons, new Comparator() {

        public int compare(Object o1, Object o2) {

            String x1 = ((Person) o1).getName();
            String x2 = ((Person) o2).getName();
            int sComp = x1.compareTo(x2);

            if (sComp != 0) {
               return sComp;
            } else {
               Integer x1 = ((Person) o1).getAge();
               Integer x2 = ((Person) o2).getAge();
               return x1.compareTo(x2);
            }
    });
}

List<Persons> is now sorted by name, then by age.

String.compareTo "Compares two strings lexicographically" - from the docs.

Collections.sort is a static method in the native Collections library. It does the actual sorting, you just need to provide a Comparator which defines how two elements in your list should be compared: this is achieved by providing your own implementation of the compare method.

share|improve this answer
2  
You can also add a type parameter to Comparator to avoid having to cast the inputs. –  biziclop Jan 26 '11 at 14:36
    
@Ralph: I have amended my answer, and added a brief description. –  Richard H Jan 26 '11 at 14:53
    
Since the OP already has their own object class, it would make more sense to implement Comparable. See the answer by @berry120 –  Zulaxia Mar 31 '12 at 8:56
    
Mini code review: the else clause is redundant because the first return acts as a guard clause. Great answer though, worked a treat for me. –  Tom Saleeba Sep 17 at 6:19

You need to implement your own Comparator, and then use it: for example

Arrays.sort(persons, new PersonComparator());

Your Comparator could look a bit like this:

public class PersonComparator implements Comparator<? extends Person> {

  public int compare(Person p1, Person p2) {
     int nameCompare = p1.name.compareToIgnoreCase(p2.name);
     if (nameCompare != 0) {
        return nameCompare;
     } else {
       return Integer.valueOf(p1.age).compareTo(Integer.valueOf(p2.age));
     }
  }
}

The comparator first compares the names, if they are not equals it returns the result from comparing them, else it returns the compare result when comparing the ages of both persons.

This code is only a draft: because the class is immutable you could think of building an singleton of it, instead creating a new instance for each sorting.

share|improve this answer

Have your person class implement Comparable<Person> and then implement the compareTo method, for instance:

public int compareTo(Person o) {
    int result = name.compareToIgnoreCase(o.name);
    if(result==0) {
        return Integer.valueOf(age).compareTo(o.age);
    }
    else {
        return result;
    }
}

That will sort first by name (case insensitively) and then by age. You can then run Arrays.sort() or Collections.sort() on the collection or array of Person objects.

share|improve this answer
    
I generally prefer this over making a Comparator, since, as berry120 says, you can then sort with built in methods, rather than needing to always use your custom Comparator. –  Zulaxia Mar 31 '12 at 8:51

Use Comparator and then put objects into Collection, then Collections.sort();

class Person {

    String fname;
    String lname;
    int age;

    public Person() {
    }

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public String getFname() {
        return fname;
    }

    public void setFname(String fname) {
        this.fname = fname;
    }

    public String getLname() {
        return lname;
    }

    public void setLname(String lname) {
        this.lname = lname;
    }

    public Person(String fname, String lname, int age) {
        this.fname = fname;
        this.lname = lname;
        this.age = age;
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
        return fname + "," + lname + "," + age;
    }
}

public class Main{

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        List<Person> persons = new java.util.ArrayList<Person>();
        persons.add(new Person("abc3", "def3", 10));
        persons.add(new Person("abc2", "def2", 32));
        persons.add(new Person("abc1", "def1", 65));
        persons.add(new Person("abc4", "def4", 10));
        System.out.println(persons);
        Collections.sort(persons, new Comparator<Person>() {

            @Override
            public int compare(Person t, Person t1) {
                return t.getAge() - t1.getAge();
            }
        });
        System.out.println(persons);

    }
}
share|improve this answer

Or you can exploit the fact that Collections.sort() (or Arrays.sort()) is stable (it doesn't reorder elements that are equal) and use a Comparator to sort by age first and then another one to sort by name.

In this specific case this isn't a very good idea but if you have to be able to change the sort order in runtime, it might be useful.

share|improve this answer

For those able to use the Java 8 streaming API, there is a neater approach that is well documented here: Lambdas and sorting

I was looking for the equivalent of the C# LINQ:

.ThenBy(...)

I found the mechanism in Java 8 on the Comparator:

.thenComparing(...)

So here is the snippet that demonstrates the algorithm.

    Comparator<Person> comparator = Comparator.comparing(person -> person.name);
    comparator = comparator.thenComparing(Comparator.comparing(person -> person.age));

Check out the link above for a neater way and an explanation about how Java's type inference makes it a bit more clunky to define compared to LINQ.

Here is the full unit test for reference:

@Test
public void testChainedSorting()
{
    // Create the collection of people:
    ArrayList<Person> people = new ArrayList<>();
    people.add(new Person("Dan", 4));
    people.add(new Person("Andi", 2));
    people.add(new Person("Bob", 42));
    people.add(new Person("Debby", 3));
    people.add(new Person("Bob", 72));
    people.add(new Person("Barry", 20));
    people.add(new Person("Cathy", 40));
    people.add(new Person("Bob", 40));
    people.add(new Person("Barry", 50));

    // Define chained comparators:
    // Great article explaining this and how to make it even neater:
    // http://blog.jooq.org/2014/01/31/java-8-friday-goodies-lambdas-and-sorting/
    Comparator<Person> comparator = Comparator.comparing(person -> person.name);
    comparator = comparator.thenComparing(Comparator.comparing(person -> person.age));

    // Sort the stream:
    Stream<Person> personStream = people.stream().sorted(comparator);

    // Make sure that the output is as expected:
    List<Person> sortedPeople = personStream.collect(Collectors.toList());
    Assert.assertEquals("Andi",  sortedPeople.get(0).name); Assert.assertEquals(2,  sortedPeople.get(0).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Barry", sortedPeople.get(1).name); Assert.assertEquals(20, sortedPeople.get(1).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Barry", sortedPeople.get(2).name); Assert.assertEquals(50, sortedPeople.get(2).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Bob",   sortedPeople.get(3).name); Assert.assertEquals(40, sortedPeople.get(3).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Bob",   sortedPeople.get(4).name); Assert.assertEquals(42, sortedPeople.get(4).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Bob",   sortedPeople.get(5).name); Assert.assertEquals(72, sortedPeople.get(5).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Cathy", sortedPeople.get(6).name); Assert.assertEquals(40, sortedPeople.get(6).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Dan",   sortedPeople.get(7).name); Assert.assertEquals(4,  sortedPeople.get(7).age);
    Assert.assertEquals("Debby", sortedPeople.get(8).name); Assert.assertEquals(3,  sortedPeople.get(8).age);
    // Andi     : 2
    // Barry    : 20
    // Barry    : 50
    // Bob      : 40
    // Bob      : 42
    // Bob      : 72
    // Cathy    : 40
    // Dan      : 4
    // Debby    : 3
}

/**
 * A person in our system.
 */
public static class Person
{
    /**
     * Creates a new person.
     * @param name The name of the person.
     * @param age The age of the person.
     */
    public Person(String name, int age)
    {
        this.age = age;
        this.name = name;
    }

    /**
     * The name of the person.
     */
    public String name;

    /**
     * The age of the person.
     */
    public int age;

    @Override
    public String toString()
    {
        if (name == null) return super.toString();
        else return String.format("%s : %d", this.name, this.age);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
Arrays.sort(persons, new PersonComparator());



import java.util.Comparator;

public class PersonComparator implements Comparator<? extends Person> {

    @Override
    public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {
        if(null == o1 || null == o2  || null == o1.getName() || null== o2.getName() ){
            throw new NullPointerException();
        }else{
            int nameComparisonResult = o1.getName().compareTo(o2.getName());
            if(0 == nameComparisonResult){
                return o1.getAge()-o2.getAge();
            }else{
                return nameComparisonResult;
            }
        }
    }
}


class Person{
    int age; String name;

    public int getAge() {
        return age;
    }

    public void setAge(int age) {
        this.age = age;
    }

    public String getName() {
        return name;
    }

    public void setName(String name) {
        this.name = name;
    }

}

Updated version:

public class PersonComparator implements Comparator<? extends Person> {

   @Override
   public int compare(Person o1, Person o2) {

      int nameComparisonResult = o1.getName().compareToIgnoreCase(o2.getName());
      return 0 == nameComparisonResult?o1.getAge()-o2.getAge():nameComparisonResult;

   }
 }
share|improve this answer
    
The nullpointer exception handling is nice and make clear that it would not work with null, but it would be raised anyway –  Ralph Jan 26 '11 at 14:43
    
You are absolutely right. I recently used to check some values to copy from one place to other and now i keep doing it everywhere. –  fmucar Jan 26 '11 at 15:47

You can use generic serial Comparator to sort collections by multiple fields.

import org.apache.commons.lang3.reflect.FieldUtils;
import java.util.Arrays;
import java.util.Comparator;
import java.util.List;

/**
* @author MaheshRPM
*/
public class SerialComparator<T> implements Comparator<T> {
List<String> sortingFields;

public SerialComparator(List<String> sortingFields) {
    this.sortingFields = sortingFields;
}

public SerialComparator(String... sortingFields) {
    this.sortingFields = Arrays.asList(sortingFields);
}

@Override
public int compare(T o1, T o2) {
    int result = 0;
    try {
        for (String sortingField : sortingFields) {
            if (result == 0) {
                Object value1 = FieldUtils.readField(o1, sortingField, true);
                Object value2 = FieldUtils.readField(o2, sortingField, true);
                if (value1 instanceof Comparable && value2 instanceof Comparable) {
                    Comparable comparable1 = (Comparable) value1;
                    Comparable comparable2 = (Comparable) value2;
                    result = comparable1.compareTo(comparable2);
                } else {
                    throw new RuntimeException("Cannot compare non Comparable fields. " + value1.getClass()
                            .getName() + " must implement Comparable<" + value1.getClass().getName() + ">");
                }
            } else {
                break;
            }
        }
    } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
        throw new RuntimeException(e);
    }
    return result;
}
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.