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I just recently resumed work on a Cocoa project that I left a few months ago. Cocoa is a strange beast if you have not been using it for a while.

Anyway, at some point the compiler started dropping warnings:

Incomplete implementation of class 'MyClass'
Method definition for '-addObserver:forKeyPath:options:context' not found
Method definition for '-removeObserver:forKeyPath:' not found
Class 'MyClass' does not fully implement the 'MyZoomScrollViewDataSource' protocol

But MyClass is derived from NSObject, which does in fact implement -addObserver:forKeyPath: and -removeObserver:forKeyPath:context:.

The protocol looks like this:

@protocol MyZoomScrollViewDataSource
    // The range of Data that should be shown. This corresponds to the horizontal  
    //   zoom and the scroll value of self.
    @property FRange selectionRange;

    // Also, make sure the dataSource is KVO compliant
    - (void)addObserver:(NSObject *)anObserver forKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath options:(NSKeyValueObservingOptions)options context:(void *)context;
    - (void)removeObserver:(NSObject *)anObserver forKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath;
@end

The class looks like this:

@interface MyClass : NSObject <MyZoomScrollViewDataSource> {
    IBOutlet Outlets...
    variables...
}
@properties...
(IBAction)actions...
- methods...
@end

I guess my Cocoa skills are in deep need for a refresh. But still, these methods should be inherited from NSObject, so how can MyClass not implement these methods?

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Is MyClass the same as NovaController? –  Bavarious Jan 27 '11 at 8:36
    
@Bavarious: Yes, it is. I corrected the question accordingly. –  bastibe Jan 27 '11 at 8:48
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4 Answers

Actually I was hasty with my answer.

Why are you declaring the KVO methods in the protocol. NSObject already implements a basic version of them?

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I do use those methods on the DataSource. If I don't declare them, I get WARNING: '-removeObserver:forKeyPath:' not found in protocol(s) right where I use them. –  bastibe Jan 26 '11 at 15:53
    
When you say DataSource you mean the NovaController class? –  Abizern Jan 26 '11 at 16:00
    
correct, I do. I corrected the question accordingly. It didn't really make too much sense until now, did it? –  bastibe Jan 27 '11 at 8:47
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The answer is in the question!

The compiler warning:

-addObserver:forKeyPath:
-removeObserver:forKeyPath:options:context:

The protocol:

-addObserver:forKeyPath:options:context:
-removeObserver:forKeyPath:

The second looks better.

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Oh, my bad. That was a typo in the question. I corrected the question. –  bastibe Jan 27 '11 at 8:18
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You should be able to avoid those warnings by using the -Wno-protocol compiler option:

If a class is declared to implement a protocol, a warning is issued for every method in the protocol that is not implemented by the class. The default behavior is to issue a warning for every method not explicitly implemented in the class, even if a method implementation is inherited from the superclass. If you use the -Wno-protocol option, then methods inherited from the superclass are considered to be implemented, and no warning is issued for them.

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does that mean that you are officially discouraged to use methods inherited from the superclass? –  bastibe Jan 27 '11 at 9:25
    
@BastiBechtold Not necessarily. I think the compiler is being (overly) conservative because it could be the case that, for a given protocol, subclasses should also implement the protocol methods. Or maybe it is literally considering that a class (regardless of its superclasses) must implement the required methods in the protocols it adopts. –  Bavarious Jan 27 '11 at 9:33
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

One possible solution to this is to explicitly add those functions to the class. This seems rather hackish to me. I would gladly use a cleaner way to do this if there is one.

@implementation MyClass

- (void)addObserver:(NSObject *)anObserver forKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath options:(NSKeyValueObservingOptions)options context:(void *)context {
    [super addObserver:anObserver forKeyPath:keyPath options:options context:context];
}

- (void)removeObserver:(NSObject *)anObserver forKeyPath:(NSString *)keyPath {
    [super removeObserver:anObserver forKeyPath:keyPath];
}

@end

The strangest thing is: This works not only with super, it works with self, too! Consider my mind blown. What the heck?

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It works in the sense that it compiles or it works in the sense that it runs? That looks like a loop to me. –  Bavarious Jan 27 '11 at 9:39
    
It runs without a hitch! It looks like a loop to me, too. Cocoa, what art thou doing? –  bastibe Jan 27 '11 at 9:42
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