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I'm using a FileManager for a project so that reading and writing is less of a hassle for me. Or would be, if I didn't spend all this time debugging it. So, this comfort-class actually caused me stress and time. Awesome.

The problem seems to be the fstream. Before I continue further, here is the structure of my FileManager class.

class FileManager : Utility::Uncopyable
{
public:
    FileManager();

    void open(std::string const& filename);
    void close();

    void read(std::string& buffer);
    void write(std::string const& data);

private:
    std::fstream stream_;
};

Very simple. The buffer is loaded with data during the read function, the data parameter is what's to be written to file. Before reading and writing you must open the file or risk getting a big, fat exception in your face. Kind of like the one I'm getting now.

Scenario: Simple command-line registering of a user, then writing the data to file. I ask for a name and password. The name is copied and appended with .txt (the filename). So it looks like this:

void SessionManager::writeToFile(std::string const& name, 
                                 std::string const& password)
{
    std::string filename = name + ".txt";
    std::string data;
    data += name +", " +password;

    try
    {
        fileManager_->open(filename);
        fileManager_->write(data);
        fileManager_->close();
    } 
    catch(FileException& exception)
    {
        /* Clean it up. */
        std::cerr << exception.what() << "\n";
        throw;
    }
}

Problem: the open fails. The file is never created, and during the write I get an exception for not having an open file.

FileManager::open() function:

void FileManager::open(std::string const& filename)
{
    if(stream_.is_open())
        stream_.close();

    stream_.open(filename.c_str());
}

and write

void FileManager::write(std::string const& data)
{
    if(stream_.is_open())
        stream_ << data;
    else
        throw FileException("Error. No file opened.\n");
}

However, if I create the file beforehand, then it has no troubles opening the file. Yet, when I check, the default std::ios::openmode is std::ios::in | std::ios::out. I can create the file just fine when I only tag std::ios::out, but I want to keep the stream in a read/write state.

How can I accomplish this?

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Best method:

void FileManager::open(std::string const& filename)
{
    using std::ios_base;
    if( stream_.is_open() )
        stream_.close();

    stream_.open( filename.c_str() ); // ...try existing file
    if( !stream_.is_open() ) // ...else, create new file...
        stream_.open(filename.c_str(), ios_base::in | ios_base::out | ios_base::trunc);
}

So the code tests for an existing file and, if not, creates it.

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You cannot use std::ios::in on a non-existing file. Use

std::ios::in | std::ios::out | std::ios::trunc

instead (but make sure it doesn't exist or it will be truncated to zero bytes).

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How can I accomplish this?

std::ofstream file("file.txt");
file << data;

Isn't that simpler?

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"but I want to keep the stream in a read/write state." –  Daniel Gehriger Jan 26 '11 at 16:20
    
I'll admit that I don't see the point in this FileManager class, but the OP wants a read/write stream. –  larsmans Jan 26 '11 at 16:20

You have to call fstream::open with an explicit openmode argument of

ios_base::in | ios_base::out | ios_base::trunc

Otherwise open will fail due to ENOENT.

Table 95 of the draft C++ standard lists possible file open modes and their equivalent in stdio. The default, ios_base::out | ios_base::in is r+. The one I listed above is equivalent to w+. ios_base::out | ios_base::app is equivalent to a. All other combinations involving ios_base::app are invalid.

(At the risk of being scoffed at: you could switch to stdio and use the file mode a+, which reads from the start and appends at the end.)

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That's the way the library works: std::ios::in | std::ios::out opens it in the equivalent of stdio's "r+", that is it will only open an existing file. I don't believe there's a mode that will do what you are wanting, you'll have to us an OS-specific call or check the file for existence (again, using an OS-specific call) and open it in one mode or the other depending on whether it already exists.

Edit: I assumed that you didn't want the file truncated if it already exists. As other people have noted, if you're happy to truncate any existing file then in | out | trunc is an option.

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Just get your function to open

void FileManager::open(std::string const& filename)
{
    using std::ios_base;
    if(stream_.is_open())
        stream_.close();

    stream_.open(filename.c_str(), ios_base::in | ios_base::out | ios_base::trunc);
}

if that is the mode you require.

There is no magic way to open a file for read/write creating it if it does not exist but not truncating it (removing its content) if it does. You have to do that in multiple steps.

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