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I have a class (those that have read Accelerated C++ may find this class familiar) defined as follows:

class Student_info{
public:
    Student_info() : midterm(0.0), final(0.0) {};
    Student_info(std::istream& is){read(is);};

    Student_info(const Student_info& s);

    ~Student_info();

    Student_info& operator=(const Student_info& s);

    //Getters, setters, and other member functions ommited for brevity

    static int assignCount;
    static int copyCount;
    static int destroyCount;

private:
    std::string name;
    double midterm;
    double final;
    double finalGrade;
    std::vector<double> homework;

};

typedef std::vector<Student_info> stuContainer;


bool compare(const Student_info& x, const Student_info& y);

A function calculator() makes use of objects of this type. As a part of the function, a vector of (already declared) Student_info objects is sorted using the library's generic sort function. My program does not progress past this point (though according to NetBeans no exceptions are thrown and the program exits correctly).

The sort function makes heavy use of the assignment operator of whatever type is held in the container, but I can't seem to find out what's wrong with the one I defined (the program was functioning properly before I defined it). According to Accelerated C++ (or at least this is how I interpreted it), the proper way the assignment operator is supposed to work is to first destroy the left operand, and then construct it again with a value equal to the right operand. So this is my overloaded operator= definition:

Student_info& Student_info::operator=(const Student_info& s)
{
    if(this != &s)
    {
        this->~Student_info();
        destroyCount++;

        *this = s;
    }

    return *this;
}

As you can see, it invokes the Student_info copy constructor, which is defined below:

Student_info::Student_info(const Student_info& s)
{
    name = s.name;
    midterm = s.midterm;
    final = s.final;
    finalGrade = s.finalGrade;
    homework = s.homework;

    copyCount++;
}

The copy constructor functions correctly, because ommiting the sort statement allows the program to function correctly and yield a copyCount (which is only modified in the copy constructor and operator=) greater than 0.

So what exactly is wrong with my assignment operator? It has to do with the destruction of the calling Student_info object, but I don't know how to rectify it short of NOT destroying it.

(And by the way, the creation of the copy constructor, destructor, and assignment operator are called for by an exercise in Accelerated C++... I realize that the synthesized versions of these functions would obviously suffice for my class)

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1  
"According to Accelerated C++ ..." -- Chapter and verse please? I'd like to see exactly what it said that mislead you. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 26 '11 at 16:24
    
Sure. It's in Chapter 11, specifically 11.3.3 "Assignment is not initialization". Its the second paragraph in that sub-section, and it reads: "The key difference stems from two observations: Assignment (operator=) always obliterates a previous value; initialization never does so." It then proceeds to give examples of code using the "=" that result in initialization, and examples of code that result in assignment. So in other words, the context of the use of "=" determines whether initialization or assignment occurs. –  Kevin Jan 26 '11 at 16:34
1  
@Kevin: That difference is syntactical. It's the difference between int a = 10; and int a; a = 10; and has nothing to do with how to implement operator= - that is, int a = 10; will become a copy constructor call, not an assignment operator call. You don't need to know or understand this difference when overloading operator=. As for the code sample on p197, as I don't have a copy, I can't define it as correct or incorrect, although if it advocates the destruct-and-copy-construct pattern, it is definitely incorrect. –  Puppy Jan 26 '11 at 16:47
1  
You'll notice the word obliterate was used instead of destroy. Although I haven't asked them personally, I would bet that Andrew and Barbara avoided the word destroy on purpose, as it is too close to the word destructor. All they are saying is that there is a previous value, and you are removing that value and replacing it with another. This is in contrast to a initialization, which is not replacing a pre-existing value. Often the distinction is trivial. e.g. Removing an int's previous value and replacing it with a new one require exactly the same operation. –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 26 '11 at 16:49
1  
I think this class doesn't need user-defined copy constructor, copy assignment operator and destructor at all, the class doesn't manage a resource, and the auto-generated special member functions would be completely fine. Also you want the second constructor to be explicit. –  Philipp Jan 26 '11 at 17:02

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

No, no, no. It's not supposed to work that way at all. Your current assignment operator destroys the object it's called on, then calls itself (oh hey, infinite recursion) on a destroyed object (oh hey, undefined behaviour). You are not supposed to destroy the existing object. At all. And this code *this = s does not invoke any constructor at all, it invokes the assignment operator- which is what you're just defining. A copy constructor call would look like new (this) Student_info(s);. This is a known pattern and it's terrible in many, many ways. If you have a book that's recommending it, throw it in the bin.

The assignment operator is supposed to copy the data from the right-hand-side into the left-hand-side. The easiest way to do that in most cases is just to copy each data member. The semantics of this operator do not involve destroying anything. Anyone using this operator has the right to expect that there is no destruction of any Student_info objects going on.

Just call the member's existing assignment operators and then implement whatever additional logic you need.

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The problem asks for the user to modify the class to be able to count how many times objects of that class are copied, assigned, or destroyed. This is the only way I could see this being done. What is the correct way to implement the assignment operator so that it mimics the synthesized version? I can do that and just add on the extra logic at the end of the function. –  Kevin Jan 26 '11 at 16:29
1  
@Kevin -- To emulate the default assignment operator, just apply the assignment operator to each of the members. e.g. name = s.name; midterm = s.midterm; etc... –  Benjamin Lindley Jan 26 '11 at 16:32
    
@Pigben: Ah... thanks. Can you clarify what is meant by the Accelerated C++ quote I posted as a comment to my original post then? I'm confused. –  Kevin Jan 26 '11 at 16:37
    
@Kevin: In a nutshell: "SomeType var = value;" and default parameter values are initialization, all other uses of = are assignment. –  Fred Nurk Jan 26 '11 at 16:45
    
@Kevin: I have posted a comment that should explain it more simply. –  Puppy Jan 26 '11 at 16:47
*this = s;

this is endless recursion. it's not copy-constructor, it's assignment operator

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struct Student_info {
  Student_info& operator=(Student_info other) {
    swap(*this, other);
    return *this;
  }

  friend void swap(Student_info &a, Student_info &b) {
    using std::swap;
    #define S(N) swap(a.N, b.N);
    S(name)
    S(midterm)
    S(final)
    S(finalGrade)
    S(homework)
    #undef S
  }

private:
  std::string name;
  double midterm;
  double final;
  double finalGrade;
  std::vector<double> homework;
};

Getters, setters, and other member functions ommited for brevity

If you have public getters and setters which are just boilerplate, consider marking the corresponding data members as public instead.

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