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I've searched SO for the answer, but it seems my particular case is just a bit different than the rest.

Basically my data consists of some "master" records with a "position" (acts_as_list in RoR), and then any number of "customized" records with a custom_position to mirror the master position. The desired result is to retrieve a set containing the master + custom records, ordered by master1, custom1..., master2, custom2...,

The master records will have a NULL custom_position; the custom records will have a custom_position equal to their master's position.

source data, unsorted:

name        sort_a   sort_b
====        ======   ======
Lorem       1        NULL
ipsum       2        NULL
dolor       3        NULL
Lorem foo   4        1
ipsum foo   5        2
dolor foo   6        3
Lorem bar   7        1
ipsum bar   8        2
dolor bar   9        3
Lorem duck  10       1
ipsum duck  11       2
dolor duck  12       3

desired sorting:

name        sort_a   sort_b
====        ======   ======
Lorem       1        NULL
Lorem foo   4        1
Lorem bar   7        1
Lorem duck  10       1
ipsum       2        NULL
ipsum foo   5        2
ipsum bar   8        2
ipsum duck  11       2
dolor       3        NULL
dolor foo   6        3
dolor bar   9        3
dolor duck  12       3

closest I've gotten: order by coalesce(sort_a, sort_b) asc

name        sort_a   sort_b
====        ======   ======
Lorem foo   4        1
Lorem bar   7        1
Lorem duck  10       1
Lorem       1        NULL
ipsum foo   5        2
ipsum bar   8        2
ipsum duck  11       2
ipsum       2        NULL
dolor foo   6        3
dolor bar   9        3
dolor duck  12       3
dolor       3        NULL

Any idea how I can achieve the desired sorting in an ORDER BY clause?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted
SELECT  *
FROM    mytable
ORDER BY
        COALESCE(sort_b, sort_a), sort_a

A query to check:

SELECT  *
FROM    (
        SELECT  'Lorem' AS name, 1 AS sort_a, NULL AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'ipsum' AS name, 2 AS sort_a, NULL AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'dolor' AS name, 3 AS sort_a, NULL AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'Lorem foo' AS name, 4 AS sort_a, 1 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'ipsum foo' AS name, 5 AS sort_a, 2 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'dolor foo' AS name, 6 AS sort_a, 3 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'Lorem bar' AS name, 7 AS sort_a, 1 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'ipsum bar' AS name, 8 AS sort_a, 2 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'dolor bar' AS name, 9 AS sort_a, 3 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'Lorem duck' AS name, 10 AS sort_a, 1 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'ipsum duck' AS name, 11 AS sort_a, 2 AS sort_b
        UNION ALL
        SELECT  'dolor duck' AS name, 12 AS sort_a, 3 AS sort_b
        ) q
ORDER BY
        COALESCE(sort_b, sort_a), sort_a
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1  
Examine row 8 in the final listing in the OP, Ipsum,2,NULL will end up in front of Lorem Foo,4,1. No good. –  Ken Downs Jan 26 '11 at 16:45
    
@Ken Downs, perhaps Quassnoi fixed it, because the test query returns the proper order for me now. –  jemminger Jan 26 '11 at 17:00
    
Thank you! This looks perfect. –  jemminger Jan 26 '11 at 17:01
    
Who am I to argue with success? :) –  Ken Downs Jan 26 '11 at 17:37

This is a bit tricky, but can be done with a UNION. The first clause goes for the NULL rows, the 2nd clause goes for the others:

select name
     , sort_a
     , sort_a as sort_b
  from myTable
 where sort_b is null
 UNION ALL
select name
     , sort_a
     , sort_b
  from myTable
 where sort_b is NOT null
 order by 3,2

Note that in a UNION query, you sort using column numbers instead of names.

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