Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have an extension method on the HttpApplicationState object for getting my IoC container out of the application. This same code will also create the container if it doesn't exist.

I have 2 questions:

  1. Is my code actually thread safe as I intend it to be
  2. Is this considered the best practice for dealing with the application state

Code as follows:

private const string GlobalContainerKey = "UnityContainerKey";

public static IUnityContainer GetContainer(this HttpApplicationState application)
{
    var container = application[GlobalContainerKey] as IUnityContainer;

    if (container == null)
    {
        try
        {
            application.Lock();
            container = application[GlobalContainerKey] as IUnityContainer;

            if (container == null)
            {
                container = new UnityContainer();
                application[GlobalContainerKey] = container;
            }
        }
        finally
        {
            application.UnLock();
        }
    }

    return container;
}
share|improve this question
    
As an aside I made this entire question pointless since I moved from Unity to StructureMap and SM exposes itself as a static class so I never need to worry about it not existing. –  Chris Marisic Feb 15 '09 at 23:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to put

var container = application[GlobalContainerKey] as IUnityContainer;

in the lock as well, otherwise many threads may create a new container in sequence.

private const string GlobalContainerKey = "UnityContainerKey";
private const object lockObject = new object();

public static IUnityContainer GetContainer(this HttpApplicationState application)
{
    var IUnityContainer container = null;

    lock (lockObject)
    {
        container = application[GlobalContainerKey] as IUnityContainer;
        if (container == null)
        {
            container = new UnityContainer();
            application[GlobalContainerKey] = container;
        }
    }

    return container;
}
share|improve this answer
    
You're right I meant for that to be inside there before the second if statement. –  Chris Marisic Jan 26 '09 at 19:35
    
There's no need of the second if statement if the first one is in the lock. Also, if using lock(), you will not need the try/finally (lock() is a syntax sugar for try/finally. –  Sunny Milenov Jan 26 '09 at 19:58
    
Right but I don't want it to lock the application on every single page request which is why I have the outer if. Can you elaborate on the usage of .Lock without a try/finally and why it's safe? Do I even need to call .Unlock? –  Chris Marisic Jan 26 '09 at 20:05
    
if you do not want to lock the application to lock on each call, then go with a static get property for the container (and make the underlying filed readonly). Then set it up in a static ctor for the application class. –  Sunny Milenov Jan 26 '09 at 20:15
    
The static ctor is guaranteed to run before any instance or static method or field is accessed. You are loosing the "lazy" initialization though. –  Sunny Milenov Jan 26 '09 at 20:17

Technically, that won't work given the EMCA specification. Jon Skeet goes into this in his C# FAQ:

http://www.yoda.arachsys.com/csharp/singleton.html

Specifically, see the section with the "Third version"

I would read further down and use his suggestion for how to implement the singleton to see how to implement what you are trying to do.

share|improve this answer
    
The difference is I'm already working with a singleton not trying to create a new singleton. Reading point 2 in his rationale against DCL is the only legitimate point however there's no elaboration why it won't work or what "explicit memory barrier calls" would be to ensure it. –  Chris Marisic Jan 26 '09 at 19:46

Why dou you check for "container == null" the first time? I think you should lock first and then check for container being null. All sort of dodgy stuff may happen between the first if and the return in other threads.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to lock the application every single time after the container exists because this gets called on every single page request. It only needs to be locked for the initial insert. I did however mean to have a second "container = application[GlobalContainerKey] as IUnityContainer;" after Lock –  Chris Marisic Jan 26 '09 at 19:37

Double check with lock is used inside the .NET Framework's code, for singletons (see System.Web.Profile.ProfileManager for example).

So I think your implementation is OK.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.