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I am having some text within html tags in a document. The text looks something like this

I need this text <ref> Some unwanted text </ref> I need this text too

and

I need this text <ref Some random text /> I need this text too

How so I remove the unwanted text along with the enclosing tags?


I tried using this regular expression. But it is not working.

<ref(.*?)>(.*?)</ref>

and

<ref(.*?)>

Trying this way in Java is not helping:

regex = "<ref(.*?)>(.*?)</ref>";
p = Pattern.compile(regex, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE | Pattern.DOTALL | Pattern.MULTILINE); 
m = p.matcher(s);
while(m.find()){
   m.replaceAll(" ");           
}

Any idea how do I get the solution?

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The actual HTML tags won't use entity identifiers like < –  Rafe Kettler Jan 26 '11 at 17:38
    
I missed to add that I have the html formatted data within xml tags. I parsed the xml tag, and retrieved the html data. Out of that, I need to remove some of the unwanted html tags. This is why the HTML data tags are like < and > –  Musical-Poet Jan 26 '11 at 17:46

3 Answers 3

First, use an HTML parser. Regular expressions will not be able to reliably handle this task if the HTML gets complex.

Second, your regular expressions seem well-formed and work as expected on simple examples (once I changed &lt; to <, that is, but I suspect you made that change when posting the question, thinking that StackOverflow would misinterpret it). The issue may be in your Java code, not the regex itself. I'm not familiar with Java's regular expression APIs, so I'll let someone else weigh in on that :)

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It seems there is limitations to the Pattern class or the String class of Java. The same regex seems to work on regexpal.com. But with my Java code, that doesnot work! –  Musical-Poet Jan 26 '11 at 17:49
  1. HTML parsing with RegEx should be avoided.

  2. Since yours is a relatively simple one, let's say we go for it. You are matching actual HTML, so you don't want &lt;, you want the actual < (&gt;, > respectively).

    <ref[^>]*/>|<ref>[^<]*</ref>
    

    Should do the trick as far I am aware, I haven't used regex in Java though so I don't know if there's need to escape a / in it.

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Strings are immutable, so replaceAll(), like any other "string-mutating" method, returns the result as a new string.

String[] ss = { 
    "I need this text &lt;ref&gt; Some unwanted text &lt;/ref&gt; I need this text too",
    "I need this text &lt;ref Some random text /&gt; I need this text too"
};

String r = "&lt;ref(.*?)&gt;(.*?)&lt;/ref&gt;|&lt;ref(.*?)&gt;";

Pattern p = Pattern.compile(r, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE | Pattern.DOTALL);
for (String s0 : ss)
{
  Matcher m = p.matcher(s0);
  String s1 = m.replaceAll("");
  System.out.printf("%n%s%n%s%n", s0, s1);
}

output:

I need this text &lt;ref&gt; Some unwanted text &lt;/ref&gt; I need this text too
I need this text I need this text too

I need this text &lt;ref Some random text /&gt; I need this text too
I need this text I need this text too

Some other notes:

  • When I consolidated your regexes, I had to use the longer one as the first alternative. It's important that they be tried in that order, because the shorter one (for empty/self-closing tags) can match in a normal tag, where you don't want it to.

  • There's no need for you to call find(); that's the first thing replaceAll() does. If there are no matches, it simply returns the original string.

  • The MULTILINE flag wasn't doing anything useful, since there are no line anchors (^ and $) in your regex (or in mine).

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