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I'd like to set something up on my site where when you scroll within 15% of the bottom of the page an element flyouts from the side... I'm not sure how to get started here... should I add a listener for a scroll function or something?

I'm trying to recreate the effect at the bottom of this page: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/25/world/europe/25moscow.html?_r=1

update

I have this code....

     console.log(document.body.scrollTop); //shows 0
     console.log(document.body.scrollHeight * 0.85); //shows 1038.7
     if (document.body.scrollTop > document.body.scrollHeight * 0.85) {
      console.log();
   $('#flyout').animate({
     right: '0'
    },
    5000,
    function() {

   });
     }

the console.log() values aren't changing when I scroll to the bottom of the page. The page is twice as long as my viewport.

share|improve this question
    
This depends on the browser and doctype; also try with document.documentElement.scrollTop; Something like (document.documentElement.scrollTop||document.body.scrollTop) may work. –  arnaud576875 Jan 27 '11 at 20:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted
+50

[Working Demo]

$(document).ready(function () {
  var ROOT = (function () {
    var html = document.documentElement;
    var htmlScrollTop = html.scrollTop++;
    var root = html.scrollTop == htmlScrollTop + 1 ? html : document.body;
    html.scrollTop = htmlScrollTop;
    return root;
  })();

  // may be recalculated on resize
  var limit = (document.body.scrollHeight - $(window).height()) * 0.85;
  var visible = false;
  var last = +new Date;
  $(window).scroll(function () {
    if (+new Date - last > 30) { // more than 30 ms elapsed
      if (visible && ROOT.scrollTop < limit) {
        setTimeout(function () { hide(); visible = false; }, 1);
      } else if (!visible && ROOT.scrollTop > limit) {
        setTimeout(function () { show(); visible = true; }, 1);
      }
      last = +new Date;
    }
  });
});
share|improve this answer
    
If you scroll to the bottom of the page, then to the top, then to the bottom before the box is hidden, the box stays hidden even though you're at the bottom. –  skibulk Dec 3 at 15:33

I know this is an old topic, but the above code that received the check mark was also triggering the $(window).scroll() event listener too many times.

I guess twitter had this same issue at one point. John Resig blogged about it here: http://ejohn.org/blog/learning-from-twitter/

$(document).ready(function(){
     var ROOT = (function () {
        var html = document.documentElement;
        var htmlScrollTop = html.scrollTop++;
        var root = html.scrollTop == htmlScrollTop + 1 ? html : document.body;
        html.scrollTop = htmlScrollTop;
        return root;
    })();

    // may be recalculated on resize
    var limit = (document.body.scrollHeight - $(window).height()) * 0.85;
    var visible = false;
    var last = +new Date;
    var didScroll = false; 

    $(window).scroll(function(){
        didScroll = true; 
    })

    setInterval(function(){
        if(didScroll){
            didScroll = false; 
            if (visible && ROOT.scrollTop < limit) {
                hideCredit(); 
                visible = false; 
            } else if (!visible && ROOT.scrollTop > limit) {
                showCredit(); 
                visible = true; 
            }
        }
    }, 30);


    function hideCredit(){
        console.log('The hideCredit function has been called.');
    }

    function showCredit(){
        console.log('The showCredit function has been called.');
    }
});

So the difference between the two blocks of code is when and how the timer is called. In this code the timer is called off the bat. So every 30 millaseconds, it checks to see if the page has been scrolled. if it's been scrolled, then it checks to see if we've passed the point on the page where we want to show the hidden content. Then, if that checks true, the actual function then gets called to show the content. (In my case I've just got a console.log print out in there right now.

This seems to be better to me than the other solution because the final function only gets called once per iteration. With the other solution, the final function was being called between 4 and 5 times. That's got to be saving resources. But maybe I'm missing something.

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+1 for the great "Learning from Twitter" article –  Ant Jul 11 at 21:02
    
This would be improved if scrolling started the interval and scroll ending cleared it. Then the interval function wouldn't always be on. –  Greg Oct 21 at 21:17
    
The concept you're referring to is "debounce" davidwalsh.name/javascript-debounce-function –  skibulk Dec 3 at 16:04

bad idea to capture the scroll event, best to use a timer and every few milliseconds check the scroll position and if in the range you need then execute the necessary code for what you need

share|improve this answer

Something like this should work:

$(window).scroll(function() {
    if (document.body.scrollTop > document.body.scrollHeight * 0.85) {
        // flyout
    }
});

document.body.scrollTop may not work equally well on all browsers (it actually depends on browser and doctype); so we need to abstract that in a function.

Also, we need to flyout only one time. So we can unbind the event handler after having flyed out.

And we don't want the flyout effect to slow down scrolling, so we will run our flytout function out of the event loop (by using setTimeout()).

Here is the final code:

// we bind the scroll event, with the 'flyout' namespace
// so we can unbind easily
$(window).bind('scroll.flyout', (function() {

    // this function is defined only once
    // it is private to our event handler
    function getScrollTop() {
        // if one of these values evaluates to false, this picks the other
        return (document.documentElement.scrollTop||document.body.scrollTop);
    }

    // this is the actual event handler
    // it has the getScrollTop() in its scope
    return function() {
        if (getScrollTop() > (document.body.scrollHeight-$(window).height()) * 0.85) {
            // flyout
            // out of the event loop
            setTimeout(function() {
                alert('flyout!');
            }, 1);

            // unbind the event handler
            // so that it's not call anymore
            $(this).unbind('scroll.flyout');
        }
    };
})());

So in the end, only getScrollTop() > document.body.scrollHeight * 0.85 is executed at each scroll event, which is acceptable.

The flyout effect is ran only one time, and after the event has returned, so it won't affect scrolling.

share|improve this answer
    
if you do things in a separate function called in an another thread, this will not affect the scrolling. for example window.setTimeout(flyout,0) this will cause finish the scroll and then flyout and like this. –  Gergely Fehérvári Feb 2 '11 at 9:47
    
yes that's what the third example code shows :-) –  arnaud576875 Feb 2 '11 at 12:50
    
updated the answer with portable function for getting scrollTop. –  arnaud576875 Feb 2 '11 at 13:33

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