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Suppose I have an array of numbers and I want to ensure that all of these fall within one of the set (x,y,z), I'm currently checking that the following evaluates to 0 :

scalar ( grep { $_ ne x && $_ ne y && $_ ne z } @arr )

Was just wondering if it'll not be easier if we had "IN" and "NOT IN" sql-like operators in perl too..

scalar ( grep { $_ NOT IN (x,y,z) } @arr )

Or is there one already ??

Thanks, Trinity

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6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

A typical way to solve this is to use a hash:

my %set = map {$_ => 1} qw( x y z ); # add x, y and z to the hash as keys
                                     # each with a value of 1

my @not_in_set = grep {not $set{$_}} @arr;
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use List::Member;
my $target = 'bar';
my @look_in = ('foo','baz','bar','etc');

if( member($target, @look_in) + 1) {
 print "It's a member of the array\n";
}

That can do the trick

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That's a handy library, thank you :) –  trinity Jan 29 '11 at 21:00

The libraries List::Util or List::MoreUtils are very useful here for testing list membership where you don't care about the values itself, but simply existence. These are more efficient than grep, because they stop looping through the list as soon as a match is found, which can really speed things up with long lists. Moreover these modules are written in C/XS, which is faster than any pure-perl implementation.

use List::MoreUtils 'any';

my @list = qw(foo bar baz);

my $exists = any { $_ eq 'foo' } @list;
print 'foo ', ($exists ? 'is' : 'is not'), " a member of the list\n";

$exists = any { $_ eq 'blah' } @list;
print 'blah ', ($exists ? 'is' : 'is not'), " a member of the list\n";

(If you are restricted to only using modules that come with core Perl, you can use first in List::Util -- it first shipped with perl in 5.7.3.)

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Hi, thanks, this seems to be a good alternative ! –  trinity Jan 29 '11 at 20:56
    
IMO this should be the chosen answer –  andrefs Nov 15 '13 at 15:48

If you're using Perl 5.10 or above, the Smart Match operator will do exactly what you're looking for.

my @filter = qw(X Y Z);
my $not_in_filter = scalar grep { ! ($_ ~~ @filter) } @array;

If Filter and/or @array are large, it may be slow, however, due to it being O(N^2). In that case, you can still use smart matching, and just change your filter:

my %filter = map { $_ => 1 } qw(X Y Z);
my $not_in_filter = scalar grep { ! ($_ ~~ %filter) } @array;

See Smart Matching in Detail in perldoc perlsyn for more info.

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Thanks @Robert, ~~ is something new to me !! –  trinity Jan 29 '11 at 20:54
    
@trinity And unfortunately the smartmatch family of features was marked as experimental in perl 5.18.0, so you probably shouldn't start using it. –  Slaven Rezic Nov 15 '13 at 8:15

If there are less than a few million different things in the array, you could also use the textbook method of set difference using a hash:

my %seen;
@seen{ @arr } = (); # Create a key for every distinct value in @arr
delete @seen{ qw(x y z) }; # And remove the ones for x, y, and z

if (keys %seen) {
    # There was something in @arr that's not x, y, or z
} else {
    # There wasn't
}
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Wow @hobbs, pretty different approach, thank you :) –  trinity Jan 29 '11 at 20:57
my $target = 'bar';
my @look_in = ('foo','baz','bar','etc');
if( $target ~~ @look_in) {
    print "target is in array ";
}

~~ is in array

my $target = 'bar';
my @look_in = ('foo','baz','bar','etc');
if( not $target ~~ @look_in) {
    print "target is not in array";
}

this is called smartmatch, some people recommend not to use them, but work work quite nice with list of strings.

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