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I have a table similar to the following:

    date    |   expiry
-------------------------    
2010-01-01  | 2010-02-01
2010-01-01  | 2010-03-02
2010-01-01  | 2010-04-04
2010-02-01  | 2010-03-01
2010-02-01  | 2010-04-02

In the table, each date may have multiple 'expiry' values. I need a query that returns the n-th smallest expiry in each date. For example, for n = 2, I would expect:

     date    |   expiry
-------------------------       
2010-01-01  | 2010-03-02
2010-02-01  | 2010-04-02

My trouble is that AFAIK, there is no aggregate function which returns the n'th largest/smallest element, so I can't use 'GROUP BY'. More specifically, if I had a magical MIN() aggregate that accepts a second parameter 'offset', I would write:

SELECT MIN(expiry, 1) FROM table WHERE date IN ('2010-01-01', '2010-02-01') GROUP BY date

Any suggestions?

share|improve this question
    
Absolutely has to be done inside a single query? It's particularly difficult because MySQL doesn't support LIMIT clauses inside subqueries. It may end up being simplest to just select everything and work out which record you actually want outside of the database. –  Chad Birch Jan 26 '11 at 20:21
    
@Chad Birch. If I have not choice - I'll do as you suggested, but I feel the requirement is simple and useful enough for me to be able to do it with a single MySql query. I might be wrong, tough :-) –  bavaza Jan 27 '11 at 6:54
    
Tagged with 'greatest-n-per-group'. Some of the answers have a general way of dealing with this missing feature in MySQL using clever tricks; the ones that generate a full group set should be selectable against. Good luck finding the magical code. –  user166390 Jan 27 '11 at 7:18
    
@Chad - care to post your comment as an answer? After reading some of the posts tagged 'greatest-n-per-group' as suggested by pst, I think you are right. –  bavaza Jan 27 '11 at 11:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

One hack is to use group_concat. Group by the date and concat the expiry date in ascending order and use substring_index function to fetch the nth value.

mysql> select * from expiry;
+------------+------------+
| date       | expiry     |
+------------+------------+
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-02-01 |
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-03-02 |
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-04-04 |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-03-01 |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-04-02 |
+------------+------------+
5 rows in set (0.00 sec)

mysql> SELECT mdate,
       Substring_index(Substring_index(edate, ',', 2), ',', -1) AS exp_date
FROM   (SELECT `date`               AS mdate,
               GROUP_CONCAT(expiry order by expiry asc separator ",") AS edate
        FROM   expiry
        GROUP  BY mdate) e1;  
+------------+------------+
| mdate      | exp_date   |
+------------+------------+
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-03-02 |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-04-02 |
+------------+------------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

In the example here the sub-query gives the following output:

+------------+----------------------------------+
| mdate      | edate                            |
+------------+----------------------------------+
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-02-01,2010-03-02,2010-04-04 |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-03-01,2010-04-02            |
+------------+----------------------------------+

substring_index(edate,',',2) goes 2 elements forward (for nth element substitute 2 by n).

+------------+------------------------------+
| mdate      | substring_index(edate,',',2) |
+------------+------------------------------+
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-02-01,2010-03-02        |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-03-01,2010-04-02        |
+------------+------------------------------+

we run another substring_index on the above output to get only the 2nd element (the last element of the intermediate result) using substring_index(substring_index(edate,',',2),',',-1)

+------------+------------------------------------------------------+
| mdate      | substring_index(substring_index(edate,',',2),',',-1) |
+------------+------------------------------------------------------+
| 2010-01-01 | 2010-03-02                                           |
| 2010-02-01 | 2010-04-02                                           |
+------------+------------------------------------------------------+

If there are too many values to concat you might run out of group_concat_max_len value (default 1024, but can be set higher).

UPDATE: The SQL given above will give nth element even when there is less n elements for tht group. To avoid that the sql can be modified as:

SELECT mdate,
       IF(cnt >= 2,Substring_index(Substring_index(edate, ',', 2), ',', -1),NULL) AS exp_date
FROM   (SELECT `date`               AS mdate,
               count(expiry) as cnt,
               GROUP_CONCAT(expiry order by expiry asc separator ",") AS edate
        FROM   expiry
        GROUP  BY mdate) e1;  
share|improve this answer

I suggest that you take your n value and use it to control your return size. For example, say you wanted the third lowest value... What you're actually after is the largest value from the bottom 3 values

So it would be TOP 1 FROM (TOP n ORDER BY col ASC)

EDIT: as noted in comments by @Chad Birch, this approach may be problematic if you are not able to use LIMIT inside of subqueries.

EDIT2: Here is an interesting workaround using JOINs with LIMIT http://lists.mysql.com/mysql/211239

share|improve this answer
    
MySQL's equivalent of MSSQL's TOP is a LIMIT clause, but it doesn't support this in subqueries, so this isn't an option if it needs to be done in one query. –  Chad Birch Jan 26 '11 at 20:25

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