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Up to now I was only developing in J2ME and would like to know about the differences compared to Android.

The situation for a java enabled phone is that it might, for example, has a built-in camera, but the manufacturer didn't implemented the Java API for camera capabilities. Which means you can't use that API. It is even possible that only parts of an API were implemented.

Now, what about Android? For what I know, when a device has Android Platform 2.2 it supports every API Level up to Level 8. And I would guess, that if the built in camera doesn't have a flash then you can't use the Android API call to change the flash mode. Is that right? Now let's assume that the device has a built in flash enabled camera. Can a developer be sure that the function for changing the flash mode can be used, or is it possible that the manufacturer didn't implemented that specific function even though it is part of the supported API Level which the device was advertised for?

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And I would guess, that if the built in camera doesn't have a flash then you can't use the Android API call to change the flash mode. Is that right?

So long as you set it to a valid value, you can always use the API. However, in your case, there is probably only one valid value (i.e., no flash).

Now let's assume that the device has a built in flash enabled camera. Can a developer be sure that the function for changing the flash mode can be used, or is it possible that the manufacturer didn't implemented that specific function even though it is part of the supported API Level which the device was advertised for?

Android devices that do not have the Android Market have no guarantees whatsoever regarding their compatibility with third-party apps.

Android devices that do have the Android Market must pass a compatibility test suite. Whether or not that test suite has a specific test for a specific API can only be determined by looking at the test suite code.

So, it depends on how you define "sure". Developers usually don't have to worry about it, but device firmware bugs do happen.

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Forget about the bugs, after all they are just the exceptions from the rule, right? ;) Maybe I should ask this way: When a manufacturer ships a device with certain hardware capabilities and supporting a certain API Level, is he then obligated to implement all API functions that match the present hardware capabilities? Or could he maybe say "I don't feel like implementing the function for turning on the flash, even though my device would be capable of supporting it"? –  szia Jan 26 '11 at 21:57
    
@szia: The device manufacturer is obligated to pass the compatibility test suite and comply with the terms of the compatibility definition document. That is all they are obligated to do. source.android.com/compatibility/index.html –  CommonsWare Jan 26 '11 at 22:17
    
Thank you. I also found your answer backed up by this article en.androidwiki.com/wiki/Google_APIs, which explains, that the API is present on the device and can be used, but the implementation might not do anything, if the device doesn't have the appropriate hardware to fullfill the function calls. –  szia Feb 23 '11 at 17:24

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