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procedure TForm1.Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
var
   i : integer;
begin
  if i > StrToInt(Edit1.Text) then
    Timer1.Enabled := False
  else
    i :=+ 1;
  SendClick(645,302);
  Sleep(2200);
  SendClick(694,619);
  Sleep(2200);
  SendClick(967,638);
  Sleep(2200);
  SendKeys('{BKSP}{BKSP}{BKSP}{BKSP}1',False);
  SendClick(917,688);
  Sleep(2200);
  SendClick(917,688);
  Sleep(2200);
  SendClick(917,688);
  amount := StrToInt(Label3.Caption) + 1;
  Label3.Caption := IntToStr(amount);
end;

for some reason it repeats only 1 time and stops... can anyone spot a problem? im pretty tired and ive went over and over it a few times and i can't seem to see one...

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yes i know i could use a for loop...and it works fine as a for loop...but it freezes the dialog box until its finished...that why i desided to use a timer... –  Bryan Jan 26 '11 at 20:19
    
This is some roundabout way of making a loop... –  badp Jan 26 '11 at 20:21
1  
Your real question should be to ask how to do this properly, without SendKeys, SendClick or any of that nonsense. –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '11 at 20:38
    
@David I'm just getting back into delphi...eventually i plan on making it find the screen position of the window and target it and base the clicks on the window width / height ect..if you feel like doing all that work for me be my guest.. until then i guess ill use my crappy newb way.. –  Bryan Jan 26 '11 at 20:52
    
do it your way if you prefer, but I'm sure there are plenty of people here that would be happy to guide you to a cleaner solution –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '11 at 21:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I is a uninitialized local variable (it contains garbage), so the result of the comparision if i > StrToInt(Edit1.Text) is random.

You may want to add a member variable to your form's class, initialize at the proper time and check it's value on the onTimer event, something like:

type
  TForm1 = class(TForm)
    ..
  private
    FTimerCount: Integer;
    FMaxTimerCount: Integer;
    ..


procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
begin
  FTimerCount := 0;
  FMaxTimerCount := 20;  //the timer will fire 20 times.
  Timer1.Enabled := True;
end;

procedure TForm1.Timer1Timer(Sender: TObject);
begin
  Inc(FTimerCount);
  Timer1.Enabled := FTimerCount < FMaxTimerCount;
  DoOtherStuff();
end;
share|improve this answer
    
how is inc(i); Timer1.Enabled := i < StrToInt(Edit1.Text); any different than if i > StrToInt(Edit1.Text) then Timer1.Enabled := False else i :=+ 1; –  Bryan Jan 26 '11 at 20:40
    
@Bob: Please read my answer again. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 26 '11 at 20:41
    
@Andreas I think @Bob must have a pre-beta version of Delphi which includes the new :=+ operator. –  David Heffernan Jan 26 '11 at 21:51
    
@David - what new operator, as far as I know, it's statue of positive 1. –  user532231 Jan 27 '11 at 14:31
1  
@daemon_x it was a joke...... –  David Heffernan Jan 27 '11 at 14:39

The line

i :=+ 1;

assigns the value +1 (also known as 1) to the variable named i. (That is, if i is equal to 55, and you do i :=+ 1, then i will be equal to 1.)

Perhaps you are seeking

i := i + 1;

or

inc(i);

?

share|improve this answer
    
delphi is an extremely forgiving language –  Bryan Jan 26 '11 at 20:24
1  
@Bob: Yes, and as Sertac et. al. correctly pointed out, when you compare i, the result is undefined since you haven't told the computer what i should be yet. –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 26 '11 at 20:25
    
-1 - how's even possible, that this absolutely pointless answer has so many pluses. the answer is the i variable is unitialized, because first condition of the event is testing this local variable, which has of course no assigned value. –  user532231 Jan 27 '11 at 9:52
    
@daemon_x: Yes, I agree that it was odd that I missed that part. Of course, I could have added it, but then I would have felt like I stole the points that rightfully should belong to Sertac et. al., who actually was first to observe this obvious error. Nevertheless, I am pretty sure that the OP intends to increment i in the timer, so I am not entirely sure that my answer is "absolutely pointless". I will consider deleting it, since Sertac et. al. have pointed out the "worst" problem in the OP's code, but still, I think the inc(i) issue is worth pointing out, so I don't know... –  Andreas Rejbrand Jan 27 '11 at 11:36
    
@Andreas - (Considering i is a global) without the inc, the i > test would have no point, I agree the intention was to increment it. Since there are multiple errors on the question and since there's no answer that sums up all, IMHO, better let the answer stay. –  Sertac Akyuz Jan 27 '11 at 12:07

You're not initializing i, it is a local variable. Hence the timer can be enabled or not depending on the arbitrary value it's memory location holds.

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ive tryed making it a global variable and setting it when the form is created.. doesnt effect it... –  Bryan Jan 26 '11 at 20:25

This is a well case that people just ignore the Warning message. I wish that compiler should spit out Hint or Error and No Warning. Warning is just a case that short comming from compiler and it should be fixed at later version.

Cheers

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