Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Note: Please don't interpret this as "homework question." This is just a thing I curious to know :)

The median of five is sometimes used as an exercise in algorithm design and is known to be computable using only 6 comparisons.

What is the best way to implement this "median of five using 6 comparisons" in C# ? All of my attempts seem to result in awkward code :( I need nice and readable code while still using only 6 comparisons.

public double medianOfFive(double a, double b, double c, double d, double e){
	//
	// return median
	//
	return c;
}

Note: I think I should provide the "algorithm" here too:

I found myself not able to explain the algorithm clearly as Azereal did in his forum post. So I will reference his post here. From http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~wwu/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=riddles_cs;action=display;num=1061827085

Well I was posed this problem in one of my assignments and I turned to this forum for help but no help was here. I eventually found out how to do it.

  1. Start a mergesort with the first 4 elements and order each pair (2 comparisons)

  2. Compare the two lower ones of each pair and eliminate the lowest one from the possibilities (3 comparisons)

  3. Add in the 5th number set aside to the number without a pair and compare the two (4 comparisons)

  4. Compare the two lowest of the two new pairs and eliminate the lower one (5 comparisons)

  5. Compare the one by itself and the lower of the last pair and the lower number is the median

    The possible median is within the parentesis

(54321)

5:4 3:2 2 comparisons

(4<5 2<3 1)

4:2 3 comparisons

2(4<5 3 1)

1:3 4 comparisons

2(4<5 1<3)

4:1 5 comparisons

1,2(4<5 3)

4:3 6 comparisons

1,2(3)4,5

Three is the median

EDIT: As your request and to prevent myself from getting more downvotes, this are C++ code I wrote to find median of five. Don't mind it's awkwardness:

double StageGenerator::MedianOfFive(double n1, double n2, double n3, double n4, double n5){
    double *a = &n1, *b = &n2, *c = &n3, *d = &n4, *e = &n5;
    double *tmp;

    // makes a < b and b < d
    if(*b < *a){
    	tmp = a; a = b; b = tmp;
    }

    if(*d < *c){
    	tmp = c; c = d; d = tmp;
    }

    // eleminate the lowest
    if(*c < *a){
    	tmp = b; b = d; d = tmp; 
    	c = a;
    }

    // gets e in
    a = e;

    // makes a < b and b < d
    if(*b < *a){
    	tmp = a; a = b; b = tmp;
    }

    // eliminate another lowest
    // remaing: a,b,d
    if(*a < *c){
    	tmp = b; b = d; d = tmp; 
    	a = c;
    }

    if(*d < *a)
    	return *d;
    else
    	return *a;

}

It should be more compact, isn't it ?

EDIT:

As @pablito pointed out in his answer. The built-in List.Sort() cannot fulfill this requirement since it uses up to 13 comparisons :]

share|improve this question
    
Uhm.. is this some kind of homework? –  driAn Jan 26 '09 at 19:10
    
No. I have my own version in C++ if you really want to see it :) –  Gant Jan 26 '09 at 19:10
    
I'm curious, if readability is so important, then why maintain the constraint to use only 6 comparisons? ;) That kind of gimmicks is usually at odds with readability. –  Vojislav Stojkovic Jan 26 '09 at 19:12
    
Is there some reason to not just use a sortable list? –  EBGreen Jan 26 '09 at 19:14
    
@Vojislav That's what make it hard to do. I see the "pseudo code" of this med of five using 6 comparisons all around but never see the nicely implemented code in any language. It would be great if SO people can give a nice implementation. –  Gant Jan 26 '09 at 19:15
show 10 more comments

10 Answers 10

up vote 9 down vote accepted

This is basically just factoring out the swapping and sorting code from your C++ example:

private static void Swap(ref double a, ref double b) {
    double t = a;
    a = b;
    b = t;
}

private static void Sort(ref double a, ref double b) {
    if (a > b) {
        double t = a;
        a = b;
        b = t;
    }
}

private static double MedianOfFive(double a, double b, double c, double d, double e){
    // makes a < b and c < d
    Sort(ref a, ref b);
    Sort(ref c, ref d);

    // eleminate the lowest
    if (c < a) {
        Swap(ref b, ref d);
        c = a;
    }

    // gets e in
    a = e;

    // makes a < b
    Sort(ref a, ref b);

    // eliminate another lowest
    // remaing: a,b,d
    if (a < c) {
        Swap(ref b, ref d);
        a = c;
    }

    return Math.Min(d, a);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice improvement of clarity, and any compiler worth anything would inline Swap and Sort if this was being used in a tight loop (the only reason I can see to implement something so specific). –  Godeke Jan 26 '09 at 21:20
    
I find your code to be the most compact code here and mark it as accepted answer. Other code are also helpful as well, and I vote them all up :) –  Gant Jan 29 '09 at 17:20
1  
This code is correct, but the comment // makes a < b and b < d is wrong; if you check after that sort you'll see that sometimes b > d. For example, this happens when you call MedianOfFive(1, 2, 3, 4, 5) and generally whenever e is the largest of the five arguments. –  Jason Orendorff Jan 22 '10 at 22:03
    
@Jason, good catch. I just copied the comments from the OP's code without checking them to see if they made sense. –  Matthew Crumley Jan 22 '10 at 22:58
add comment

I found this post interesting and as an exercise I created this which ONLY does 6 comparisons and NOTHING else:

static double MedianOfFive(double a, double b, double c, double d, double e)
{
    return b < a ? d < c ? b < d ? a < e ? a < d ? e < d ? e : d
                                                 : c < a ? c : a
                                         : e < d ? a < d ? a : d
                                                 : c < e ? c : e
                                 : c < e ? b < c ? a < c ? a : c
                                                 : e < b ? e : b
                                         : b < e ? a < e ? a : e
                                                 : c < b ? c : b
                         : b < c ? a < e ? a < c ? e < c ? e : c
                                                 : d < a ? d : a
                                         : e < c ? a < c ? a : c
                                                 : d < e ? d : e
                                 : d < e ? b < d ? a < d ? a : d
                                                 : e < b ? e : b
                                         : b < e ? a < e ? a : e
                                                 : d < b ? d : b
                 : d < c ? a < d ? b < e ? b < d ? e < d ? e : d
                                                 : c < b ? c : b
                                         : e < d ? b < d ? b : d
                                                 : c < e ? c : e
                                 : c < e ? a < c ? b < c ? b : c
                                                 : e < a ? e : a
                                         : a < e ? b < e ? b : e
                                                 : c < a ? c : a
                         : a < c ? b < e ? b < c ? e < c ? e : c
                                                 : d < b ? d : b
                                         : e < c ? b < c ? b : c
                                                 : d < e ? d : e
                                 : d < e ? a < d ? b < d ? b : d
                                                 : e < a ? e : a
                                         : a < e ? b < e ? b : e
                                                 : d < a ? d : a;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Concise and simple. Rotfl. –  zendar Jan 22 '10 at 12:32
    
Cool! Glad you have find this question useful :) –  Gant Jan 22 '10 at 14:48
    
+1 for pretty formatting –  R.. Oct 16 '10 at 16:52
add comment

An interesting thread here:

http://www.ocf.berkeley.edu/~wwu/cgi-bin/yabb/YaBB.cgi?board=riddles_cs;action=display;num=1061827085

Quote from thread:

1) Put the numbers in an array. 
2) Use three comparisons and shuffle around the numbers so that a[1] < a[2], a[4] < a[5], and a[1] < a[4]. 
3) If a[3] > a[2], then the problem is fairly easy. If a[2] < a[4], the median value is the smaller of a[3] and a[4]. If not, the median value is the smaller of a[2] and a[5]. 
4) So a[3] < a[2]. If a[3] > a[4], then the solution is the smaller of a[3] and a[5]. Otherwise, the solution is the smaller of a[2] and a[4].
share|improve this answer
    
This is looking great. The solution I found is also from the same thread. A solid implementation in C# would also be fine :D –  Gant Jan 26 '09 at 19:56
add comment

This is pretty ugly and could use some refactoring, but it explicitly walks through all the comparisons and swaps so you can see what's going on.

public double medianOfFive(double a, double b, double c, double d, double e){
    double median;
    // sort a and b
    if(a > b) // comparison # 1
    {
        double temp = a;
        a = b;
        b = temp;
    }

    // sort c and d
    if(c > d)  // comparison # 2
    {
        double temp = c;
        c = d;
        d = temp;
    }

    // replace the lower of a and c with e
    // because the lowest of the first four cannot be the median
    if(a < c) // comparison # 3
    {
        a = e;
        // re-sort a and b
        if(a > b) // comparison # 4
        {
            double temp = a;
            a = b;
            b = temp;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        c = e;
        // re-sort c and d
        if(c > d)  // comparison # 4
        {
            double temp = c;
            c = d;
            d = temp;
        }
    }

    // eliminate a or c, because the lowest
    // of the remaining four can't be the median either
    if(a < c) // comparison #5
    {
         if(b < c) // comparison #6
         {
              median = c;
         }
         else
         {
              median = b;
         }
    }
    else
    {
         if(d < a) // comparison #6
         {
              median = a;
         }
         else
         {
              median = d;
         }
    }
    return median;
}
share|improve this answer
    
very clear. thanks! –  Wei Shi Jun 23 '11 at 15:02
add comment

Just to check how many comparisons:

    class MyComparable : IComparable
{

    public static int NumberOfComparisons = 0;

    public int NumPart { get; set; }

    #region IComparable Members

    public int CompareTo(object obj)
    {
        NumberOfComparisons++; //I know, not thread safe but just for the sample
        MyComparable mc = obj as MyComparable;
        if (mc == null)
            return -1;
        else
            return NumPart.CompareTo(mc.NumPart);
    }

    #endregion
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<MyComparable> list = new List<MyComparable>();
        list.Add(new MyComparable() { NumPart = 5 });
        list.Add(new MyComparable() { NumPart = 4 });
        list.Add(new MyComparable() { NumPart = 3 });
        list.Add(new MyComparable() { NumPart = 2 });
        list.Add(new MyComparable() { NumPart = 1 });
        list.Sort();


        Console.WriteLine(MyComparable.NumberOfComparisons);
    }
}

the result is 13.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Thanks. I put your result in my question body too. –  Gant Jan 26 '09 at 20:18
add comment

Thanks. I know your posts are quite old, but it was useful for my issue.

I needed a way to compute the median of 5 SSE/AVX registers (4 floats / 8 floats at once, or 2 doubles/4 doubles at once):

  • without any conditional jumps

  • only with min/max instructions

If the min/max functions are programmed for scalar registers with conditional jumps, my code is not optimal in term of comparisons. But if the min/max functions are coded with corresponding CPU instructions, my code is very effective because no conditional jump is done by the CPU when executing.

    template<class V> 
    inline V median(const V &a, const V &b, const V &c)
    {
      return max(min(a,b),min(c,max(a,b))); 
    } 

    template<class V> 
    inline V median(const V &a, const V &b, const V &c, const V &d, const V &e)
    {
      V f=max(min(a,b),min(c,d)); // discards lowest from first 4
      V g=min(max(a,b),max(c,d)); // discards biggest from first 4
      return median(e,f,g);
    } 
share|improve this answer
add comment

This should do it

private Double medianofFive(double[] input)
{
    Double temp;
if (input[0] > input[1])//#1 - sort First and Second
{
    temp = input[0];
    input[0] = input[1];
    input[1] = temp;
}
if (input[2] > input[3])//#2 sort Third and Fourth
{
    temp = input[2];
    input[2] = input[3];
    input[3] = temp;
}

// replace the smaller of first and third with 5th, then sort
int smallerIndex = input[0] < input[2] ? 0 : 2;//#3
input[smallerIndex] = input[4];

//sort the new pair
if(input[smallerIndex]>input[smallerIndex+1])//#4
{
    temp = input[smallerIndex];
    input[smallerIndex] = input[smallerIndex+1];
    input[smallerIndex+1] = temp;
}

//compare the two smaller numbers
// then compare the smaller of the two's partner with larger of the two
// the smaller of THOSE two is the median
if (input[2] > input[0])
//#5
{
    temp = input[2] > input[1] ? input[1] : input[2];//#6
}
else
{
    temp = input[0] > input[3] ? input[3] : input[0];//#6
}
    return temp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Don't know what's going on, but it looks fine in preview, but gets cut off on the main page –  Kevin Jan 26 '09 at 20:27
    
Fixed. Use the markdown editor, not your own form of markdown. –  GEOCHET Feb 18 '09 at 12:33
add comment

For completeness, the question is a specific case of a sorting network, which Knuth (Art of Computer Programming, vol 3) covers in great detail. The classic paper by K.E. Batcher on the subject is brief and worth reading.

share|improve this answer
    
This is great! Thanks :) –  Gant Feb 18 '09 at 13:57
add comment

Interesting how many comparisons in MSDN sample...

public static double Median(this IEnumerable<double> source) {
        if (source.Count() == 0)  throw new InvalidOperationException("Cannot compute median for an empty set.");

        var sortedList = from number in source
                         orderby number
                         select number;

        int itemIndex = (int)sortedList.Count() / 2;

        if (sortedList.Count() % 2 == 0) {
            // Even number of items.
            return (sortedList.ElementAt(itemIndex) + sortedList.ElementAt(itemIndex - 1)) / 2; } else {
            // Odd number of items.
            return sortedList.ElementAt(itemIndex); }
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment
-- In Haskell the solution could look like

import Data.Function

median5By pred [a,b,c,d,e] = fst $ merge2 c' d' where
  merge2 = merge2By pred
  merge2By pred x y = if x `pred` y then (x,y) else (y,x)
  ((_,b'), de   ) = merge2By (pred `on` fst) (merge2 a  b) (merge2 d e)
  ((_,c'),(d',_)) = merge2By (pred `on` fst) (merge2 b' c)  de

main = print $ median5By (<) [2,5,4,1,3]
share|improve this answer
    
question states "c#" –  user1901867 Oct 29 '13 at 2:37
    
But question "How does one find the median of 5 distinct values with 6 comparisons? [duplicate]" at stackoverflow.com/questions/8805320/… links to this one. –  John Tromp Oct 29 '13 at 17:14
    
-1 as it's not answering the question. –  Gabriele Petronella Oct 30 '13 at 5:25
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.