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I'm looking for a way to get two pieces of information:

  • The full path of where a script resides including its filename
  • The full path of where a script was executed from

I know you can use $0 to get the file name, but are there any other reserved variables that are native to Perl that will give me what I'm looking for?

I'd rather not use any special modules, but if it is the only way, then so be it.

share|improve this question
3  
"I'd rather not use any special modules" -- why? Note that there are a lot of modules that come packaged with the perl distribution, also. – Ether Jan 26 '11 at 20:46
    
@ether - for the same reason i don't like ketchup on hotdogs i suppose – CheeseConQueso Jan 27 '11 at 15:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

the PWD environment variable holds the current working directory, which should be the path the script was executed from.

You can derive the full path of the script with $ENV{PWD} and $0

Edit: providing sample code since it is hard for some to believe this is possible:

I may not have caught all the possible cases, but this should get very close:

use strict;
use warnings;

print "PWD: $ENV{PWD}\n";
print "\$0: $0\n";

my $bin = $0;
my $bin_path;

$bin =~ s#^\./##; # removing leading ./ (if any)

# executed from working directory
if ($bin !~ m#^/|\.\./#) {
  $bin_path = "$ENV{PWD}/$bin";
}
# executed with full path name
elsif ($bin =~ m#^/#) {
  $bin_path = $0;
}
# executed from relative path
else {
  my @bin_path = split m#/#, $bin;
  my @full_path = split m#/#, $ENV{PWD};

  for (@bin_path) {
    next if $_ eq ".";
   ($_ eq "..") ? pop @full_path : push @full_path, $_;
  }
  $bin_path = join("/", @full_path);
}

print "Script Path: $bin_path\n";

Output from test runs:

PWD: /tmp
$0: ../home/cmatheson/test.pl
Script Path: /home/cmatheson/test.pl

PWD: /home/cam
$0: ./test.pl
Script Path: /home/cam/test.pl

PWD: /usr/local
$0: /home/cam/test.pl
Script Path: /home/cam/test.pl

PWD: /home/cam/Desktop/foo
$0: ../../src/./git-1.7.3.2/../../test.pl
Script Path: /home/cam/test.pl
share|improve this answer
    
oh yeah.... i didn't even think of that. thanks. the only question i have about that is if when cron runs the script, will that still work? – CheeseConQueso Jan 26 '11 at 20:43
4  
$PWD contains the current working directory of the script, not the location of the script. For example, my cwd might be ~ but the script might be located in /usr/bin. – Ether Jan 26 '11 at 20:48
2  
@cam: This does answer the second part of the question -- where the script is executed from. This cannot, however, be used to find the path to the location of the script. Remove the last sentence. – maxelost Jan 26 '11 at 20:53
    
@Ether: precisely. I did not recommend joining $ENV{PWD} and $0 variables. It is true, however, that $0 will either be an absolute path (in which case he can use it directly), or it will be relative to ENV{PWD}, in which case the full path can be derived from the two. – cam Jan 26 '11 at 20:53
    
@maxelost. Please see my reply to @Ether. It's possible I am mistaken, but I believe my answer is correct. – cam Jan 26 '11 at 20:54

Using FindBin and Cwd:

#!/usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;

use Cwd        ();
use FindBin    ();
use File::Spec ();

my $full_path = File::Spec->catfile( $FindBin::Bin, $FindBin::Script );
my $executed_from_path = Cwd::getcwd();

print <<OUTPUT;
Full path to script: $full_path
Executed from path:  $executed_from_path
OUTPUT

Sample output (script saved as /tmp/test.pl):

alanhaggai@love:/usr/share$ /tmp/test.pl 
Full path to script: /tmp/test.pl
Executed from path:  /usr/share
share|improve this answer
use File::Spec;

print File::Spec->rel2abs($0);

prints full path to your script including filename as you want.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks deck - ill check it out – CheeseConQueso Jan 26 '11 at 20:44

This is available with the built-in $FindBin::Bin variable (see perldoc FindBin):

use FindBin;
use File::Spec;

print "the location of my script is: ", $FindBin::Bin, "\n";
print "the basename of my script is: ", $FindBin::Script, "\n";
print "the full path (symlinks resolved) of my script is: ", File::Spec->catfile($FindBin::RealBin, $FindBin::RealScript), "\n";
share|improve this answer

For an solution that also handles symlinks,

use Cwd            qw( realpath );
use File::Basename qw( dirname );

# Look for modules in the same dir as the script.
use lib dirname(realpath($0));
share|improve this answer

You asked about special Perl stuff and no one has mentioned __FILE__. Check perldata for it and more. I use this idiom often when I have a related subtree of files/scripts/modules–

use Path::Class qw( file );
use File::Spec;

my $self_file = file( File::Spec->rel2abs(__FILE__) );
print
    " Full path: $self_file", $/,
    "Parent dir: ", $self_file->parent, $/,
    " Just name: ", $self_file->basename, $/;
share|improve this answer

You can use the core Cwd module to get the directory from which the script was executed, and the core File::Spec module to find the whole path to the script:

#!perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use Cwd;
use File::Spec;

my $dir = getcwd();
print "Dir: $dir\n";

print "Script: " . File::Spec->rel2abs($0) . "\n";
share|improve this answer
    
getcwd() returns the current working directory of the script, not the location of the script. For example, my cwd might be ~ but the script might be located in /usr/bin. – Ether Jan 26 '11 at 20:48
    
I took "The full path of where a script was executed from" to mean "the path where I was when I executed the script". – CanSpice Jan 26 '11 at 20:50
    
you are correct canspice, i do want to know the path where i was when i executed the script. in addition, i want to know where the script itself lives – CheeseConQueso Jan 27 '11 at 15:32

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