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is there a way to iterate again within the for loop? For example:

for x in list:
  if(condition):
      #I'd like to grab the next iteration of the list 

So if I had [1,2,3,4], I'd be iterating over 1 first, then trying to advance the iteration to 2 within the for loop so that when the loop started again, it'd be at 3.

Possible?

I'm creating a parser that reads an if statement, then wants to read lines up until it hits a line that terminates the if statement.

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7 Answers 7

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could do something like this:

a = [1,2,3,4,5]
b = iter(a)

try:
    while True:
        c = b.next()
        if (condition):
            c = b.next()
except StopIteration:
    pass
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this will work best. thanks! –  joslinm Jan 26 '11 at 21:34
3  
unless you need to be backard compatible with 2.5, you should use next(b) instead of b.next() –  gnibbler Jan 26 '11 at 21:44

If the item you're using over is an iterable object you can use item.next() to grab the next element. But you'll need to make sure to grab the StopIteration exception if needed.

>>> it = iter(range(5))
>>> for x in it:
...     print x
...     if x > 3:
...         print it.next()
... 
0 1 2 3 4
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <module>
StopIteration
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This is what I'd usually do. But use next(it) instead of it.next() since that becomes it.__next__() in Python3 –  gnibbler Jan 26 '11 at 21:46

You want the continue statement.

for x in list:
  if(condition):
      continue
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Not quite sure if this is what OP was thinking of (continue skips to the next item), but it's propably what he should use ;) +1 –  delnan Jan 26 '11 at 21:23
    
Not really. I probably should have been more clear -- if I continue, I'll lose the position I was in within the code. So if something was true that got me within the if statement, I want to use the next iteration within that block. If I continue, control is passed right back to the beginning of the loop right? –  joslinm Jan 26 '11 at 21:23
    
@joslim: Then you'll have to deal with the ugly guts of iterating yourself, so you can call next on the iterator. You don't want to go there. And you don't need to in 99.99% of all cases. Rethink your solution, you can propably get along without continue (sorry I'm vague, but it's hard to suggest an alternative if we don't know what exactly you want to do). –  delnan Jan 26 '11 at 21:25
    
Ah thank you. I guess it'd have to be something more along the lines of what samurail is saying -- define variables outside the scope that notify the for loop where I'm at and what I'm trying to do. If you read my edit, I'm basically just trying to parse out an if statement's block of code. –  joslinm Jan 26 '11 at 21:27
skip = False
for x in list:
    if skip:
        skip = False
        continue
    # Do your main loop logic here
    if (condition):
        skip = True
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You can use a while loop instead of a for. In pseudocode:

idx = 0
while idx < length(list)
    x = list[idx]
    ...
    if (condition)
        idx += 1
    ...
    idx += 1
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If you're iterating a list and only ever will iterate lists, yes. Generally, an unfolded for look looks different (getting iterator, while True in try ... except StopIteration: pass, getting next(iterator) at the end). –  delnan Jan 26 '11 at 21:27

You can always bypass the for loop and just use the iterator explicitly:

iter = list.__iter__()
while True:
    x = iter.next()
    ...
    if (condition):
        x = iter.next()
    ...

This will throw a StopIteration exception when it reaches the end of the list.

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I suspect that your approach to parsing an if statement is not a good way to go about it. You will also find that you can't nest your IF statements nor put them all one one line. Here is how I would go about it.

a) Convert your language into a BNF form. For example, for an if statment it might be

ifstmnt ::=  IF &lt;condiftion> THEN &lt;trueblock> [ ELSE &lt;elseblock> ]

statment ::= ifstmnt | assignstment | whilestmnt | forstmnt 

etc

b) Work out what you are waiting for at each point. After the IF, you read a condition until you see THEN.

c) Write a getNextToken routine that reads characters from your source, until it has a complete token. A token is a recognisable unit - IF, THEN, A number, a symbol. Every time it is called it returns the token into a buffer. It is usefull to have a type and a value returned as well - it will save you converting numbers in many places. A table driven approach is very fast and flexible.

d) Then write lots of little routines to recognise each type of statement. One for IF, one for condition, one for block, one for statement, one for expression etc. These will call each other and return when they have recognised the statement. For example, the condition expression recogniser will read a boolean expression and eat all names, AND, OR etc, until it looks ahead and sees THEN. It can't handle THEN so it exists, and the IF recoogniser finds the token is THEN, it reads the next and calls the recogniser for a block (which might expect BEGIN, lots of statments and then END).

e) Each routine collects the data it needs - condition, trueblock, falseblock, and handles it as required. A very common treatment is to create a tree representation of the program in memory. Programmer defined names are collected in a dictionary as they are defined, and checked as they are used.

f) A real compiler will then try to re-arange the tree to make things more efficent - but I suggest that is a future develoment

g) The final action is then to walk the tree, evaluating it in some way. If you are writng an interpreter you can calulate the values and store then as you go - store the values in the doctionary. If you are writting a true compiler you will need to generate a suitable output for the linker. That is a major task.

Check out YACC and LEX. They are tools designed to do parts of the job, and will save you time. The terms to help your research are "lexical analysis" "parser" and similar.

And good luck. Your project is non-trivial!

See also http://nedbatchelder.com/text/python-parsers.html

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