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I have a bit IsDefault column. Only one row of data within the table may have this bit column set to 1, all the others must be 0.

How can I enforce this?

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4  
Have you considered an alternative architecture? Say, having a reference somewhere else that points to the "default" row. –  Anon. Jan 26 '11 at 22:12
1  
what version of SQL Server please? –  gbn Jan 26 '11 at 22:12
    
What a great question! I'm only writing this to express my other +99 points of appreciation. –  Andriy M Jan 27 '11 at 8:59

4 Answers 4

All versions:

  • Trigger
  • Indexed view
  • Stored proc (eg test on write)

SQL Server 2008: a filtered index

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX IX_foo ON bar (MyBitCol) WHERE MyBitCol = 1
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Well, that would certainly keep them from saving multiple records with a default. –  Chris Lively Jan 26 '11 at 22:15

You could apply an Instead of Insert trigger and check the value as it's coming in.

Create Trigger TRG_MyTrigger
on MyTable
Instead of Insert
as
Begin

  --Check to see if the row is marked as active....
  If Exists(Select * from inserted where IsDefault= 1)
  Begin
     Update Table Set IsDefault=0 where ID= (select ID from inserted);

     insert into Table(Columns)
     select Columns from inserted
  End

End

Alternatively you could apply a unique constraint on the column.

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Assuming your PK is a single, numeric column, you could add a computed column to your table:

ALTER TABLE YourTable
  ADD IsDefaultCheck AS CASE IsDefault
     WHEN 1 THEN -1
     WHEN 0 THEN YourPK
  END

Then create a unique index on the computed column.

CREATE UNIQUE INDEX IX_DefaultCheck ON YourTable(IsDefaultCheck)
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+1 never thought of this. A DRI solution without a filtered index –  gbn Jan 26 '11 at 22:31
    
+ 1 nice solution. –  Mitch Wheat Aug 6 '11 at 2:55

I think the trigger is the best idea if you want to change the old default record to 0 when you insert/update a new one and if you want to make sure one record always has that value (i.e. if you delete the record with the value you would assign it to a different record). You would have to decide on the rules for doing so. These triggers can be tricky because you have to account for multiple records in the inserted and deleted tables. So if 3 records in a batch try to update to become the default record, which one wins?

If you want to make sure the one default record never changes when someone else tries to change it, the filtered index is a good idea.

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