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I was surprised that Java's AtomicInteger and AtomicLong classes don't have methods for modular increments (so that the value wraps around to zero after hitting a limit).

I figure I've got to be missing something obvious. What's the best way to do this?

For example, I want to share a simple int between threads, and I want each thread to be able to increment it, say, mod 10.

I can create a class which uses synchronization/locks, but is there a better, easier way?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

What's difficult about adding a synchronized modifier or block to your addModular() method?

The reason why the Atomic classes don't have this functionality is that they're based on specific atomic hardware instructions offered by current CPUs, and modular arithmetic cannot be implemented by those without resorting to locking or other more complex and potentially inefficient algorithms like the one suggested by matt.

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Thanks Michael, and everyone else for the explanation and implementations. –  Mark Jan 28 '11 at 4:28

Just mod 10 the value when you read from it?

public class AtomicWrappingCounter {
  private final AtomicLong counter = new AtomicLong();
  private final int max;

  public AtomicWrappingCounter(int max) {
    this.max = max;
  }

  public int get() {
    return (int) (counter.get() % 10);
  }

  public int incrementAndGet() {
    return (int) (counter.incrementAndGet() % 10);
  }
}

Obviously if you might increment this counter more than Long.MAX_VALUE times, you couldn't use this approach, but 9 quintillion is a lot of times to be incrementing (around 292 years at a rate of 1 per nanosecond!).

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I would think the simplest way is to build a wrapping counter yourself which stores it's values in an AtomicInteger, something like

public class AtomicWrappingCounter {
    private AtomicInteger value;
    private final int max;

    public AtomicWrappingCounter(int start, int max) {
        this.value = new AtomicInteger(start);
        this.max = max;
    }

    public int get() {
        return value.get();
    }

    /* Simple modification of AtomicInteger.incrementAndGet() */
    public int incrementAndGet() {
        for (;;) {
            int current = get();
            int next = (current + 1) % max;
            if (value.compareAndSet(current, next))
                return next;
        }
    }
}

Why doesn't AtomicInteger provide something like this itself? Who knows, but I think the intention of the concurrency framework authors were to provide some building blocks you could use to better create your own higher-level functions.

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They only really need to implement get and compareAndSet in the framework. All the other methods can be built on those. –  finnw Jan 26 '11 at 22:54
1  
Clever - but I suspect that under heave contention this would actually perform worse than synchronization. –  Michael Borgwardt Jan 26 '11 at 23:09
    
@Michael can you elaborate why? Would it be any different than AtomicInteger's own behavior? –  matt b Jan 26 '11 at 23:35
1  
@Michael: The thing is, incrementAndGet() is implemented just like his method here except without the mod. –  ColinD Jan 26 '11 at 23:40
1  
Right, so in such a situation you wouldn't want to use Atomic classes anyway, a situation which basically negates the core of this question. Good info to know though. –  matt b Jan 26 '11 at 23:58

I was surprised that Java's AtomicInteger and AtomicLong classes don't have methods for modular increments.

Don't be surprised when a standard class does not include "bells and whistles" to support all sorts of unusual use-cases. The designers have to draw a line somewhere on what they include and what they don't include. The tendency is to support common use cases and use cases that cannot possibly be supported any other way. In this case, neither of these criteria apply.

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