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We've built an application on top of ASP.NET MVC. We now need to allow our users to manage their documents online. As part of this system, users want to upload and share documents with other members of their organization.

We have an existing web application that needs this functionality as a value add. We are trying to find out what our options are to accommodate this need. We are ultimately looking for a back end solution that will help us with a lot of the grunt work associated with version control. Access to documents still need to be maintained through our domain model, and web user interface.

We need to be able to...

  • upload documents
  • see the version history of each document
  • perform full text search
  • calculate file size

We're considering:

  • building our own domain model, and storing documents in a database
  • integrating with subversion to use it as our back end.

Which approach has worked for you? What are some of the benefits and drawbacks for each? Are there any other alternatives?

The solution that we choose needs to abide by the following criteria:

  • needs to fit nicely into our automated deployments.
  • we need to be able to run the application on our local developer machines, without needing a connection to a separate server
  • we would like something light weight, and easy to upgrade & deploy
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So you are looking for a tool to do this for you? Why do you say you are making it in asp.net mvc? –  GEOCHET Jan 26 '09 at 20:22
    
We have an existing application that needs this functionality as a value add. We are trying to find out what our options are to accommodate this need. We are ultimately looking for a back end solution that will help us with a lot of the grunt work associated with version control. –  mr mo Jan 26 '09 at 20:26

7 Answers 7

Subversion does sound like the best bet here, just train the users that have to manage the documents in how to use TortoiseSVN and then have your document storage be a sub directory of your project.

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We need to serve these documents over the web through an existing application, that requires clients to be logged in. We also need to restrict what documents users can see and edit. Can you do this with TortoiseSVN as a client? –  mr mo Jan 26 '09 at 20:44
    
@mr mo: With the exception of going through a browser, yes. Have you looked at tortoisesvn yet before rejecting it? –  GEOCHET Jan 26 '09 at 20:49
    
This doesn't sound like the way to go - if you're looking to server documents through a browser and manage upload through a browser then TortoiseSVN isn't going to give you this. –  Nick Pierpoint Jan 28 '09 at 16:14

Have you looked at Sharepoint which is basically what you are describing?

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<ul> <li>This needs to fit nicely into our automated deployments.</li> <li>we need to be able to run the application on our local developer machines, without needing a connection to a separate server</li> <li>we would like something light weight, and easy to upgrade</li> </ul> –  mr mo Jan 26 '09 at 20:16
    
You need to put a lot more information with what part you are specifically having trouble with in your question then. –  GEOCHET Jan 26 '09 at 20:19

Why not just use subversion with one of the many clients that might suit your needs out of the box?

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We need to ensure that our domain model can still control what documents each user is able to see. We want users to still use the same web interface that they have been using with our existing system. –  mr mo Jan 26 '09 at 20:43

If you are building it yourself and using C# and SVN then sharpSVN looks like a good solution. With full access to the SVN Client API you should be able to happily be able to integrate the web application to a SVN backend. Enforcing security by SVN properties or some other meta data store.

Some of the problems I can see are:

  • you that if you have multiple sites it maybe hard to get different SVN Repos to play nice when they have to sync up (if they have to).
  • SVN doesn't do much more than store binary blobs, so it will only version the objects, and not be able to give you diffs of them. This may lead to a very large SVN database.
  • It is also currently not possible to purge a file from a repo, which will also lead to large SVN repos.
  • If different people can revise documents, and expect them to be different "branches" of the document, then it may be better to use a distributed source control model where such things are easier.
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Although it would be nice to re-use something like Subversion on the server, it does make application roll-out more complicated. If you're happy with this then sharpSVN (as suggested by Andrew Cox) seems like a good fit.

If you're less worried about some of the version control aspects of Subversion (diffs and branches) then I'd be tempted to knock together a quick document management module to your existing application.

I would use Lucene to handle the tricky stuff - indexing and full text search.

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If I were you I would investigate Sharepoint, or at least Sharepoint Portal services. This is precisely the scenario the solution addresses

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

We opted to build our own domain model, and store documents in a SQL Server 2008 database. So far this has worked great for us.

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