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Specifically I'm trying to do this? How would I accomplish it?

class Test {
    private int var1;

    public Test(int var1) {
        var1 = var1; //set the member variable to what was passed in
    }
}

I'm sure there's a very obvious answer. It's just escaping me right now.

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Have a look at some good code. You'll see that exactly this (this.x = x) gets used for setters and constructors. There's no point in inventing a new name. –  maaartinus Jan 27 '11 at 3:38
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3 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Yes, they can share the same name. However, to reference the instance variable, you need to use the this prefix:

public Test(int var1) {
    this.var1 = var1;
}
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1  
So "this" is normally optional? But in this case, I need it since the names conflict? Am I understanding that correctly? –  Greg Jan 27 '11 at 3:00
    
@Greg - exactly. –  Jonathon Faust Jan 27 '11 at 3:00
1  
In this case, you don't need it because the names conflict, you need it to tell the JVM to get the reference from a different (specific) scope. "super." works similarly, but gets the variable/method from the class you're extending (an even "bigger" scope). Some languages would even offer a "global." type modifier, but not Java. –  Dolph Jan 27 '11 at 3:16
1  
@Dolph - good explanation. It will happily compile and run with the var1 = var1 and later on you'd end up with a 0 value where you didn't expect one or a NullPointerException if var1 is an object. –  Jonathon Faust Jan 27 '11 at 3:19
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Yes you can, but local variable will hide the class variable.

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Yes, We can. but just "can". it's not good.

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2  
-1 "it's not good" is not helpful. Besides, there are common patterns where this is "good." –  Dolph Jan 27 '11 at 3:14
    
I will notice my wording. hope people know what I mean in my answer.. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Jan 27 '11 at 3:20
2  
I don't know what you mean by your answer? –  jzd Jan 27 '11 at 3:25
    
"can": can be compiled. –  卢声远 Shengyuan Lu Jan 27 '11 at 3:42
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