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I have the following code:

class Player:
    def __init__(self, username, trip, model):
        self.username = username
        self.trip = trip
        self.hp = 100


    #### For player moving location/room ####
    def Move(self, dest):
        if dest == self.loc:
            return True

        # Check destination room is accessible from current room
        for room in aGame['rooms']:
            if room['ref'] == self.loc:
                for acsroom in room['acs']:
                    if acsroom == dest:
                        self.loc = dest
                        return True
        return False

aGame is an array which is defined outside this class so this code doesn't work. Since there is likely to be many other functions within this class which will possibly use the aGame array, should i do this:

class Player:
    def __init__(self, username, trip, model, aGame):
        self.username = username
        self.trip = trip
        self.hp = 100
        self.aGame = aGame            

    #### For player moving location/room ####
    def Move(self, dest):
        if dest == self.loc:
            return True

        # Check destination room is accessible from current room
        for room in self.aGame['rooms']:
            if room['ref'] == self.loc:
                for acsroom in room['acs']:
                    if acsroom == dest:
                        self.loc = dest
                        return True
        return False

Or would it be better to do this:

class Player:
    def __init__(self, username, trip, model):
        self.username = username
        self.trip = trip
        self.hp = 100          

    #### For player moving location/room ####
    def Move(self, dest, aGame):
        if dest == self.loc:
            return True

        # Check destination room is accessible from current room
        for room in aGame['rooms']:
            if room['ref'] == self.loc:
                for acsroom in room['acs']:
                    if acsroom == dest:
                        self.loc = dest
                        return True
        return False

Or should i make aGame a global variable (if so, how, note that this class is in a different file)?

Since aGame is an array that gets used all over the place, it doesn't seem correct to have to make copies of it inside every class. I may have this wrong, i'm slowly learning OOP so thanks for any help.

share|improve this question
3  
You don't actually copy the aGame dictionary into each class - arguments are passed "by reference". –  miku Jan 27 '11 at 3:27

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In my opinion, the first option is right out as it uses globals for no good reason. So the choice is between the second and the third.

The deciding feature is if you are going to want to use the same Player instance for more than one aGame value. If there will only ever be one value, then I would either pass it to the constructor (your option 2) or use gnibbler's idea of making it a class variable. I would probably favor passing it to the constructor for ease of testing.

If you want the same Player instance to be usable with multiple aGame values, then option 3 is probably the cleanest way to achieve that.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks :) There will be multiple instances of Player, but one version of aGame. aGame is a dict with values loaded from a file - so having to re-load those values from the file all the time would be inefficient. I guess i will have to use option 2 of setting aGame into the class with self. and hoping that i don't end up having to update the aGame dict for whatever reason later in the app. –  Tommo Jan 27 '11 at 3:49
    
@Tommo, as long as you pass the same instance to all instances, any modifications that you make to it will be visible from every instance. Python doesn't copy the dictionary it just creates a new reference to it. Also, if you're reading from a file, you might want to look at using Walter Mundt's idea with a class method to populate the array. –  aaronasterling Jan 27 '11 at 3:59

Is aGame the same for every instance? Then you can make it a class attribute either like this

class Player:
    aGame={'rooms':...}
    ...

or

Class Player:
    ...

Player.aGame={'rooms':...}

Within the class, you can still access it via self.aGame

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Only the first choice will work. In the second example, for room in self.aGame['rooms'] will produce an error because nowhere is aGame bound to self. It would work if it was for room in aGame['rooms'], but then you would have to unnecessarily pass aGame every time you call move().

You can also make it a global variable, but it's best just to have each Player hold an aGame instance. If you need to change aGame and have multiple players, you should define it as a global variable.

Also, just nitpicking, but aGame is not an array, it's a dictionary. The Python language doesn't even have arrays (though some extensions do).

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry i forgot to remove 'self.' because in the second example the aGame variable was passed into the method. –  Tommo Jan 27 '11 at 3:28
    
If i added aGame to the Player class, isn't that just making a copy of the current aGame and applying it to the Player instance? So if aGame changes after the class is initialized then player1.aGame would be different? –  Tommo Jan 27 '11 at 3:30
    
@Tommo, okay, well then my answer still stands. Why pass aGame every time you call move() when each Player can just own an instance? The first solution makes more sense and requires less work on your part. If you need to change aGame and have multiple players, you should define it as a global variable. –  Rafe Kettler Jan 27 '11 at 3:31

I'd use a slight variation on a global:

# in game.py or whatever
class Game(object):
    instance = {} # this is your aGame array

# in player.py or whatever:
from game import Game

class Player(object):
    # ...
    def Move(self, dest):
        # ...
        for room in Game.instance['rooms']:
            # ...

Alternatively, you could make Game a proper class, assign Game.instance = Game(...) somewhere during your initialization phase, and get more of a real singleton pattern going.

share|improve this answer
    
What is the benefit of this convolution? –  aaronasterling Jan 27 '11 at 3:36
    
Well, I'm presuming the global ought to stay in a separate module. In that case, it removes the dependency that the global have a value at import time. Without having a container class, the player module would have to do from game import aGame. If, say, initialization code were to assign to the aGame global after loading the player module, the player module's aGame value would no longer be correct. In this version, that's not an issue. Secondly, it makes the transition to having a Game class for game-wide state more obvious, which I think is probably a good thing. –  Walter Mundt Jan 27 '11 at 3:40

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