Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Ok this code works but I think it has some necessary steps in the middle to get to the outcome. Any thoughts on how to make it tighter?

Public Function CalCheckSum(ByVal ByteList As List(Of Byte)) As List(Of Byte)
    Dim total As Integer = 0
    For Each b As Byte In ByteList
        total = total + b

    Next
    Dim modedVal As Integer = 0
    modedVal = total Mod &H100
    Dim negatedValue As Integer = 0
    negatedValue = &H100 - modedVal
    Dim charList As List(Of Char) = Hex(negatedValue).ToCharArray.ToList
    Dim returnList As New List(Of Byte)
    For Each ch As Char In charList
        returnList.Add(Asc(ch))

    Next
    Return returnList

End Function

BTW This is what I'm using to test it:

Dim blist As New List(Of Byte)
blist.Add(&H52)
blist.Add(&H34)
blist.Add(&H35)
blist.Add(&H31)
blist.Add(&H32)
blist.Add(&H33)
blist.Add(&H34)
blist.Add(&H30)

blist.Add(&H30)
blist.Add(&H30)
blist.Add(&H30)
blist.Add(&H46)
blist.Add(&H46)
blist.Add(&H46)
blist.Add(&H46)
blist.Add(&H42)
blist.Add(&H4B)
blist.Add(&H9)
blist.Add(&H44)

Dim b As List(Of Byte) = CalCheckSum(blist)

The correct values for b are:

  • b(0) = &H43
  • b(1) = &H39
share|improve this question
    
I don't know much about checksum algorithms but &H100 looks weird. You sure you don't want &HFF? –  Chris Haas Jan 27 '11 at 4:12
    
Is there a particular reason you're reinventing your own checksumming algorithm, as opposed to using one of those already provided by the .NET Framework in the System.Security.Cryptography namespace? For example, an MD5 hash is usually a perfectly workable solution. –  Cody Gray Jan 27 '11 at 4:29
    
Cody Gray: I'm not inventing my own checksum algorithm. The above is to communicate with an embedded hardware device that already uses this algorithm. I"m just writing it in vb.net so I can communicate with that device. As I said, the above works to communicate with the device... just the code looks messy. –  avword Jan 27 '11 at 13:20
    
Hi Chris - yes &H100 (or 256 decimal) is apparently correct. From the original checksum document: All fields are summed up and mod 0x100 on this is calculated. This is then negated to arrive at the two byte checksum. The checksum value is converted to two hex digits and inserted in the message –  avword Jan 27 '11 at 13:27
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'm honestly not sure why you'd waste the time it takes to optimize this. Calling that function over 100,000 times in a loop takes less than 20 milliseconds. Even if this is one of the "hot points" in your application (since you say it communicates with an embedded hardware device), it's unlikely that you'll see any appreciable speed increase by optimizing the code that you have.

But just for fun, I decided to see if I couldn't optimize things a little anyway... Here's what I came up with:

  1. Remove the redundant List(Of Char) creation. You're already converting the values to an array with the ToCharArray method. Why go through the expense of calling ToList on that, just to iterate through it? You can iterate just as well through an array. This shaves the time down to around 8 seconds, a pretty massive speed-up for minimal effort.

  2. You can also pass in the approximate size of your new List(Of Byte) as an argument to the constructor. You already know this from the size of your charArray, since you're just adding each of those elements back in. This doesn't make any difference when you're only working with two items, as in the example you provided, but it could make things slightly more efficient for substantially larger numbers of elements because the List wouldn't have to be dynamically resized at any point during the loop.

  3. There's absolutely no difference between Asc, AscW, and Convert.ToInt32. I measured each of them explicitly just to see. My gut instinct was to change that to AscW, but apparently it doesn't matter. Lots of people will turn their nose up at the use of VB-specific idioms, and recommend what they consider more universal methods provided by the .NET Framework. It turns out that since all the VB-specific code is written in the same managed code as the alternatives, it's a simple matter of preference which you use.

  4. Otherwise replacing List(Of T) with simple arrays doesn't make any appreciable difference, either. Since a List is easier to work with outside of the function, you might as well keep it as the returned type.

So my final code looks something like this:

Public Function CalCheckSum(ByVal ByteList As List(Of Byte)) As List(Of Byte)
    Dim total As Integer = 0
    For Each b As Byte In ByteList
        total = total + b
    Next

    Dim negatedValue As Integer = 0
    negatedValue = &H100 - (total Mod &H100)

    Dim charArray As Char() = Hex(negatedValue).ToCharArray()

    Dim returnList As New List(Of Byte)(charArray.Length)
    For Each ch As Char In charArray
        returnList.Add(CByte(Asc(ch)))
    Next

    Return returnList
End Function

Even running this 999,000 times in a loop, I consistently clock it somewhere between 62 and 64 ms.

You could also use LINQ. It's not really my area, and I doubt you'll see any measurable speed increases (it still has to do the same amount of looping and iterating under the covers). The big benefit it provides is that your code is simpler and looks cleaner. I'm surprised someone hasn't already posted this solution.

EDIT: As an aside, your original code didn't compile for me. I had to add in the CByte operator to convert the Integer value returned from the Asc operator into a Byte type. That tells me that you're not programming with Option Strict On. But you should be. You have to explicitly set the option in your project's properties, but the benefits of strong typing far outweigh the cost of going through and fixing some of your existing code. You might even notice a performance increase, especially if you've been using a lot of late binding inadvertently.

share|improve this answer
    
Cody Gray: Thank you very much. This is exactly the kind of response I was looking for. I am by no means a full-time (or part time) programmer so I really appreciate this level of detailed explanation as it really does help with learning. I am very thankful that you took the time to test and write this out. Also, thanks for the note about option strict – I will start programming with that on and see how I do. Again thank you! –  avword Jan 29 '11 at 16:35
    
@avword: You're welcome. Of course, I'm not a full-time programmer either. ;-) But I do enjoy some healthy optimization, even if it's evil. I'm glad I was able to give you a firmer understanding of what goes on behind the scenes. Some tricks (like eliminating the extra List that you were creating) are cheap, easy, and straightforward. Those are the kind of optimizations you might as well implement. Anything beyond that is far too much work and too much risk for minimal reward. The rule of thumb is that premature optimization is evil; meaning you shouldn't optimize until you know a piece of –  Cody Gray Jan 30 '11 at 7:25
    
(continued) code is too slow. Timing it is the best way. And so that you can test execution speed yourself in the future, have a look at the Stopwatch class provided by the .NET Framework. There's a great example of how it's used on that page, and it's not hard at all. That's all I did here, so you won't even need me again. :-) Best of luck! –  Cody Gray Jan 30 '11 at 7:26
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.