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A log file has lots of data and is sorted based on data and time. The size of each log may vary in size.

I want to search for specific pattern in log file and if the pattern matches, it should display that particular log on the screen.

Any shell commands would be appreciable.

Log file example:-

07/17/2008 10:24:12.323411 >00.23
Line   441 of xx file
Dest IP Address: 192.189.52.255           Source IP Address: 192.189.52.200 

 000:   0101   0600   4D8C   444C    0000   0000   C0BD   34C8
 008:   C0BD   34C9   C0BD   34C9    0000   0000   FFFF   FFFF


07/17/2008 10:24:12.323549 >000.000138
    Use req data

 000:   0231   7564   705F   7573    7272   6571   2073   6F63

07/17/2008 10:24:12.323566 >000.000017
Local 192.189.52.200  Port 68 : Remote 0.0.0.0         Port 0

 000:   012D                                                   .-               
 000:   0000   0000   000A   0002    000A   012D               ...........-    

   0: NULNUL NULNUL NULLF  NULSTX  NULLF  SOH -               

Here if I search for particular ip address 192.189.52.200. It should display whole event log correspondingly like,

07/17/2008 10:24:12.323566 >000.000017
Local 192.189.52.200  Port 68 : Remote 0.0.0.0         Port 0

 000:   012D                                                   .-               
 000:   0000   0000   000A   0002    000A   012D               ...........-    

   0: NULNUL NULNUL NULLF  NULSTX  NULLF  -               
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This requires GNU AWK (gawk) because of using a regex for the record separator (RS).

#!/usr/bin/awk -f
BEGIN {
    pattern = ARGV[1]
    delete ARGV[1]

    # could use --re-interval
    d = "[0-9]"
    RS = d d "/" d d "/" d d d d " " d d ":" d d ":" d d "[^\n]*\n"
}

NR > 1 && ($0 ~ pattern || rt ~ pattern) {
    print rt
    print $0
}

{
    rt = RT # save RT for next record
}

It's not pretty, but it works.

Run it like this:

./script.awk regex logfile

Examples:

$ ./script.awk 'C0BD|012D' logfile

07/17/2008 10:24:12.323411 >00.23

Line   441 of xx file
Dest IP Address: 192.189.52.255           Source IP Address: 192.189.52.200

 000:   0101   0600   4D8C   444C    0000   0000   C0BD   34C8
 008:   C0BD   34C9   C0BD   34C9    0000   0000   FFFF   FFFF



07/17/2008 10:24:12.323566 >000.000017

Local 192.189.52.200  Port 68 : Remote 0.0.0.0         Port 0

 000:   012D                                                   .-
 000:   0000   0000   000A   0002    000A   012D               ...........-

   0: NULNUL NULNUL NULLF  NULSTX  NULLF  SOH -

$ ./script.awk '10:24:12.323549' logfile
07/17/2008 10:24:12.323549 >000.000138

    Use req data

 000:   0231   7564   705F   7573    7272   6571   2073   6F63
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@Dennis: Thanks, I am using cygwin. When I try to run this shell script, it is displaying whole logfile instead of displaying particular log event. –  Thangaraj Jan 27 '11 at 7:13
    
@Thangaraj: It works fine for me in Cygwin. Does your log file have Windows or Unix line endings? What does awk --version say? Using your example data, what regexes did you try? Did you quote them? –  Dennis Williamson Jan 27 '11 at 7:24
    
@Dennis: $ awk --version GNU Awk 3.1.8 $ ./script.awk '10:24:12.323549' winLogfile.txt I have save this log file using notepad and vi editor as well. But the result is same. Any help to address this problem would be appreciable. –  Thangaraj Jan 27 '11 at 8:27
    
@Thangaraj: That's the same as I have. What about my other questions? –  Dennis Williamson Jan 27 '11 at 8:29
    
@Dennis: Please refer above. –  Thangaraj Jan 27 '11 at 8:30

You can use -A[n] flag with grep, where n us the number of lines after the match. e.g

grep -A6 '192.189.52.200' my.log
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unfortunately this doesn't work with the requirement that each entry be of different lengths –  xaxxon Jan 27 '11 at 5:51

If you have Ruby or possibility to install it, you could write a script to parse the log file and print matching entries. Here is a script that should work:

filename=ARGV[0]
regexpArg=ARGV[1]
unless filename and regexpArg
        puts "Usage: #{$0} <filename> <regexp>"
        exit(1)
end

dateStr='\d\d\/\d\d\/\d\d\d\d'
timeStr='[0-9:.]+'
whitespace='\s+'
regexpStr = dateStr + whitespace + timeStr + whitespace + '>[0-9.]+'
recordStart=Regexp.new(regexpStr)
records=[]
file=File.new(filename, "r")
addingToRecord = false
currentRecord = ""
file.each_line { |line|
        match = recordStart.match(line)
        if addingToRecord
                if match
                        records.push(currentRecord)
                        currentRecord = line
                else
                        currentRecord += line
                end
        else
                if match
                        addingToRecord = true
                        currentRecord = line
                end
        end
}
file.close
regexp=Regexp.new(regexpArg)
records.each { |r|
        if regexp.match(r)
                puts "----------------------------------------"
                puts r
                puts "----------------------------------------"
        end
}
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