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template <class T>
class A
{
    private:
        T m_var;
    public:
        operator T () const { return m_var; }
        ........
}

template<class T, class U, class V>
const A<T> operator+ (const U& r_var1, const V& r_var2)
{ return A<T> ( (T)r_var1 + (T)r_var2 ); }

The idea is to overload the + operator once (instead of three) for the cases: number + A, A + number, A + A (where number is of type T, the same as m_var). An interesting case would be if m_var is e.g. int and r_var is long.

Any helps would be highly appreciated. Thank you.

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4 Answers 4

The common pattern to achieve what you want is to actually perform it in the opposite direction: provide an implicit conversion from T to the template and only define the operator for the template.

template <typename T>
struct test {
   T m_var;
   test( T const & t ) : m_var(t) {}   // implicit conversion
   test& operator+=( T const & rhs ) {
      m_var += rhs.m_var;
   }
   friend test operator+( test lhs, test const & rhs ) { // *
      return lhs += rhs;
   }
};
// * friend only to allow us to define it inside the class declaration

A couple of details on the idiom: operator+ is declared as friend only to allow us to define a free function inside the class curly braces. This has some advantages when it comes to lookup for the compiler, as it will only consider that operator if either one of the arguments is already a test.

Since the constructor is implicit, a call test<int> a(0); test<int> b = a + 5; will be converted into the equivalent of test<int> b( a + test<int>(5) ); Conversely if you switch to 5 + a.

The operator+ is implemented in terms of operator+=, in a one-liner by taking the first argument by value. If the operator was any more complex this would have the advantage of providing both operators with a single implementation.

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The starred note is one of the most useful, even if mere syntactic sugar, uses of 'friend'. –  Fred Nurk Jan 27 '11 at 9:46
    
The idea was to avoid more than one overloading. With more than one overloading it is trivial. All the other can be based upon the test& operator+=( T const & rhs ) –  meta-cpp Jan 28 '11 at 23:01

The issue with your operator+ is you have 3 template parameters, one for the return type as well as the cast, but there is no way for the compiler to automatically resolve that parameter.

You are also committing a few evils there with casts.

You can take advantage of the that if you define operator+ as a free template function in your namespace it will only have effect for types defined in that namespace.

Within your namespace therefore I will define, using just T and U

template< typename T >
T operator+( const T & t1, const T& t2 )
{
   T t( t1 );
   t += t2; // defined within T in your namespace
   return t;
}

template< typename T, typename U >
T operator+( const T& t, const U& u )
{
    return t + T(u);
}

template< typename T, typename U >
T operator+( const U& u, const T& t )
{
   return T(u) + t;
}

a + b in general is not covered by this template unless one of the types of a and b is in the namespace where the template was defined.

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thank you for your suggestion, but I have it already done this way. I am just wondering if instead of two overloads I can have one. –  meta-cpp Jan 29 '11 at 9:02

You should not overload op+ for unrelated types that you know nothing about – this can break perfectly working code that already exists. You should involve your class as at least one of the parameters to the op+ overload.

If you don't want an implicit conversion from T to A<T>, then I would just write out the overloads. This is the clearest code, and isn't long at all, if you follow the "@ to @=" overloading pattern:

template<class T>
struct A {
  explicit A(T);

  A& operator+=(A const &other) {
    m_var += other.m_var;
    // This could be much longer, but however long it is doesn't change
    // the length of the below overloads.
    return *this;
  }
  A& operator+=(T const &other) {
    *this += A(other);
    return *this;
  }

  friend A operator+(A a, A const &b) {
    a += b;
    return a;
  }
  friend A operator+(A a, T const &b) {
    a += A(b);
    return a;
  }
  friend A operator+(T const &a, A b) {
    b += A(a);
    return b;
  }

private:
  T m_var;
};
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I have already written all of them and I want to see if there is a more compact way of doing things. –  meta-cpp Jan 28 '11 at 23:02

C++0x solution

template <class T>
class A
{
    private:
        T m_var;
    public:
        operator T () const { return m_var; }
        A(T x): m_var(x){}
};

template<class T,class U, class V>
auto operator+ (const U& r_var1, const V& r_var2) -> decltype(r_var1+r_var2)
{
    return  (r_var1 + r_var2 );
}

int main(){

    A<int> a(5);
    a = a+10;
    a = 10 + a;
}

Unfortunately changing template<class T,class U, class V> to template<class U, class V> invokes segmentation fault on gcc 4.5.1. I have no idea why?

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Isn't this op+ infinitely recursive? Its return type depends on itself, which is probably the reason for the segfault. –  Fred Nurk Jan 27 '11 at 9:53
2  
I am not surprised that the compiler chokes on that... of course a compile time error would be better than the compiler dying... If you think of it there are a couple of things wrong in that templated operator+. The first is that it will become the best candidate for many operations for which you do not what it to apply. In particular, it becomes the best candidate for std::string("foo")+"bar", as the template is a better choice than conversion from literal to std::string and then calling + on two strings. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 27 '11 at 9:55
    
Hmm right. BTW this outputs 25 as expected on Ideone. –  Prasoon Saurav Jan 27 '11 at 9:55
    
The second thing is that you are telling the compiler that the type of return of the operator+ has to be deduced as the type of return of itself. decltype( r_var1 + r_var2 ) is the same as saying decltype( this template that you are trying to define ) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 27 '11 at 9:57
    
I have tried the code and I get the following compiler error: expected type specifier before 'decltype'. I use gcc 4.5.2 –  meta-cpp Jan 29 '11 at 9:00

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