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I have a form that I am trying to alter with jQuery. Basically, my form has two elements and I need to change the value of the first option in each of them. However, there is an "add more" option that uses AJAX to dynamically generate another element that also needs changed. This add more button can be clicked an unlimited amount of times.

Right now I have this:

$(document).ready(function(){
  $("#myname-0-field option:first").val("None");
  $("#myname-1-field option:first").val("None");
});

This works fine, but once the "add more" button is clicked, I have more elements called "#myname-2-field", "#myname-3-field", "#myname-4-field" etc. These obviously aren't affected by adding another line into my jQuery as the document has already loaded when they are added.

So the real question is, can someone point me in the right direction of writing a function that can react when the new element is added and change it. If possible, I'm also looking for the function to be aware and look for "#myname-X-field option:first" for tidyness.

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2 Answers 2

use live() function

Then using each function set value

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From the jQuery API look live function

Maybe you could add class to your element, so that finding particular element would be easier and it would not add event to other similar elements.

In the example I have a Li with class

$('li.myClass').live('click', function() {
    $(this).val(); // this is the getter for clicked value
    $(this).val("some_value_here"); // this is the setter for clicked value
});

Now you can add more elements (that has myClass class) and it will have a click event.

Btw. if you know that all elements are inside some container (div for example) then you can write more efficient jQuery using delegate.

$('#container_id').delegate('li.myClass', 'click', function () {
});

This is more efficient because it looks your new elements only under "containter" not from the whole DOM structure.

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Thanks very much for this. So just to be clear, I'd like to use delegate with the live function, but I can't figure out the syntax to use. I've decided just to remove the element instead so I have something like this: $(document).ready(function(){ $("#group-items").delegate(select.form-select, "click", function () { $(this).val(); $(this option:first).remove(); }); }); –  Jamie Hollern Jan 27 '11 at 11:13
    
delegate doesn't look anything, it just handles an event closer to the event target so that less bubbling is involved. –  galambalazs Jan 27 '11 at 11:16
    
@Jamie Hollern Inside your delegate call you should have quotes around select.form-select, so correct would be 'select.form-select' –  Tx3 Jan 27 '11 at 11:50
    
@galambalazs In a way it "looks" for new items that are added in the future "Attach a handler to one or more events for all elements that match the selector, now or in the future, based on a specific set of root elements." –  Tx3 Jan 27 '11 at 11:52
    
It doesn't have to look (or know for that matter) anything about the elements "below" him. When an event happens it gets the target of that event (one element), and decides how to deal with it. –  galambalazs Jan 27 '11 at 13:14

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