Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

When I ran this program:

#include <iostream>

int sqr(int&);

int main()
{
    int a=5;
    std::cout<<"Square of (5) is: "<< sqr(a) <<std::endl;
    std::cout<<"After pass, (a) is: "<< a <<std::endl;
    return 0;
}

int sqr(int &x)
{
    x= x*x;
}

I got the following output:

Square of (5) is: 2280716
After pass, (a) is: 25

What is 2280716? And, how can I get a value returned to sqr(a) while there is no return statement in the function int sqr(int &x)?

Thanks.

share|improve this question
4  
WTF? Why would you want to write such code? Clearly sqr is a mathematical function and it makes no sense to use the parameter as in-out. –  Ilya Kogan Jan 27 '11 at 11:40
    
@Ilya Kogan. Just testing how pass by reference works –  Simplicity Jan 27 '11 at 11:47

6 Answers 6

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Strictly, this causes undefined behavior. In practice, since sqr has return type int, it will always return something, even if no return statement is present. That something can be any int value.

Add a return statement and turn on warnings in your compiler (g++ -Wall, for instance).

int sqr(int &x)
{
    return x = x*x;
}
share|improve this answer
3  
+1 for -Wall. (Now, if you'd add -Werror ... no, I can't upvote twice, damn. :-)) –  Christopher Creutzig Jan 27 '11 at 12:02
    
It is a little less simple, not returning anything in a function with a return type other than void causes undefined behavior, not just the return of an undefined value. The difference is that stating that it will return an undefined value means that by simply ignoring that value everything will be fine, but that is not so. The program could crash, corrupt the stack... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Jan 27 '11 at 12:41

That's some garbage that will depend on a handful of factors. Likely that's the value stored in memory where the function would put the result if it had a return statement. That memory is left untoched and then read by the caller.

Don't think of it too much - just add a return statement.

share|improve this answer

Your function sqr() has no return statement. The function has undefined behavior concerning return value. Your first output shows this return value.

The compiler should show a diagnostic though.

try this:

int sqr(int x)
{
  return x*x;
}
share|improve this answer
    
g++ shows no warning unless -W is given. –  larsmans Jan 27 '11 at 11:41
    
@larsmans. What is the syntax of using -W? g++ ..... Thanks –  Simplicity Jan 27 '11 at 11:44
    
g++ -Wall for default warnings. Check out the manual for specific warnings. –  larsmans Jan 27 '11 at 11:45

You are trying to print the return value of sqr(int &x), which is garbage value in this case. But not returning the proper X*X. try returning valid X*X from sqe

int sqr(int &x) { x= x*x; return x;}

share|improve this answer

If a function is not declared void then you MUST have a return statement telling what should be the value when returning to the caller. If you fail to do so and simply the function end without returning a value the result of calling this function is "Undefined Behavior" that means that your program could do anything (including crashing or deleting everything that is on your hard disk).

Normally if the value is just a simple int you will get funky numbers, but in more complex cases can be a source of big troubles. Just don't do that.

Compilers will normally inform you that you forgot a return statement if properly instructed to do so (i.e. by enabling the maximum warning level). You can omit to return a value only for cases where the function doesn't actually return (i.e. throws an exception or loops forever).

share|improve this answer

You need to make a choice between:

1) Passing by reference/value AND return an INT.

2) Passing by reference AND return void.

This choice depends on the purpose of your function.

If you want a function that gives you the square of a number use the first. If you want a function that takes a variable and replaces it by its square, use the second.

So either:

int sqr(int& x)
{
    return x*x;
}

OR

void sqr(int& x)
{
    x= x*x;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.