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I'm trying to put some key values in Map and trying to retrieve them in same sequence as they were inserted. For example below is my code

import java.util.*;
import java.util.Map.Entry;

public class HashMaptoArrayExample {

    public static void main(String args[])

    {
   Map<String,Integer> map=  new HashMap<String,Integer>();

   // put some values into map

   map.put("first",1);
   map.put("second",2);
   map.put("third",3);
   map.put("fourth",4);
   map.put("fifth",5);
   map.put("sixth",6);
   map.put("seventh",7);
   map.put("eighth",8);
   map.put("ninth",9);



    Iterator iterator= map.entrySet().iterator();
       while(iterator.hasNext())
       {
           Entry entry =(Entry)iterator.next();   
           System.out.println(" entries= "+entry.getKey().toString());
       }

    }
}

I want to retrieve the keys as below

first second third fourth fifth sixth .....

But it's displaying in some random order as below in my output

OUTPUT

ninth eigth fifth first sixth seventh third fourth second
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Duplicated ?? stackoverflow.com/questions/663374/java-ordered-map –  msalvadores Jan 27 '11 at 11:45
3  
@bestsss: I take the opposite approach: use the simplest type which meets your requirements. Unless you need to maintain insertion order, why use a more complex (and costly) type? The vast majority of the time, HashMap does me fine. It does exactly what it says on the tin, and no more - why do you dislike it so much? –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '11 at 11:52
1  
@bestsss: On the contrary, I relatively rarely iterate over a map - I'm much more likely to just use it for get/put. More importantly, when I use HashMap instead of LinkedHashMap I'm effectively expressing the fact that I don't care about ordering. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '11 at 12:05
1  
@bestsss: Yes, but then IdentityHashMap is often not what you want in terms of behaviour ;) Personally my main beef with the map classes in Java is that there's no equivalent of .NET's IEqualityComparer which lets you generalise the equality relationship. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '11 at 12:12
2  
@bestsss: Maybe we write very different apps :) I like to use the most appropriate type for my actual requirements. Using a more fully-featured type suggests I probably need those extra features... which can make it harder to find a different type when my requirements expand later. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '11 at 12:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 29 down vote accepted

You can't do this with HashMap, which doesn't maintain an insertion order anywhere in its data. Look at LinkedHashMap, which was designed precisely to maintain this order.

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Thanks a lot. It worked great. One last question. Instead of using iterator.hasNext() can i use advanced for loop –  Sukumar Jan 27 '11 at 11:54
    
@Sukumar: Absolutely: for (Map.Entry<..,..> entry : map.entrySet()) { ... }. –  Jon Skeet Jan 27 '11 at 12:07
    
sure you can (for x : y) is effectively compiled to iterator; hasNext(), next() –  bestsss Jan 27 '11 at 12:19
    
Thanks a lot guys. It really helped me. –  Sukumar Jan 27 '11 at 12:34
    
LinkedHashMap doesn't have a method to get a specific index. In my case, I want to get the last number inserted. Can any existing DataStructures do that? –  Imray Jun 28 '13 at 20:07

HashMap is a hash table. It means that the order in which keys are inserted is irrelevant, as they are not stored in this order. The moment you insert another key, the information about what was the last key is forgotten.

If you want to remember the insertion order, you need to use a different data structure.

share|improve this answer
    
.....which one? –  Imray Jun 28 '13 at 20:06
    
@Imray Look at Jon's answer. –  Ilya Kogan Jun 28 '13 at 22:01

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