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I have started using boost pools as singleton defined in boost/pool/singleton_pool.hpp as I need to allocate a lot of structures of same size repeatedly. The performance improvement is phenomenal as I was using malloc before.

The objects that I allocate are put in a list by a producer thread and a consumer thread takes these off the other end and frees the objects. But when I free object the memory usage of the process in task manager never reduces. I am guessing this is because a certain amount of memory is preallocated by the pool library?

Also when the data rate of the producer increases the total memory usage seems to increase in chunks ~ 10k but never reduces even after calling free for objects in the pool.

I would like to do some house keeping periodically to free the memory chunks to reduce the overall memory usage of the process. Is this possible? I cant use purge_memory as it will mean I would have to synchronise purge between produces and consumer. BTW does purge_memory frees the chunk i.e. reduce the memory usage in task manager?

I am programming in MS windows.

Thanks Niladri

PS - I have tried using release_memory by making the pool ordered ( ordered_malloc) but it always returns false.

UPDATE:

Have not tried purge_memory yet as the pool is shared between two threads. But have found that release_memory works but only for ordered pools and is slow in releasing memory as it only frees memory blocks with no allocations.

Purge will work faster I am sure.

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If it is slow because it do not free used memory, for me it's a feature, not a problem :) You can send an order to your threads that pause/stop the processing and forbid the use of memory, before calling purge ? What the exact use case you try to address ? –  neuro Jan 27 '11 at 15:03
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3 Answers

Have not tried purge_memory yet as the pool is shared between two threads. But have found that release_memory works but only for ordered pools and is slow in releasing memory as it only frees memory blocks with no allocations.

Purge will work faster I am sure.

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Please don't use an answer to post an update to your question. Either add a comment to your question, or use the EDIT button to append the update to your original question. This is to ensure that people are up to date with your problem/question before spending time on writing an answer that might no longer be relevant. –  Emile Cormier Jan 27 '11 at 14:54
    
I agree. And please delete this answer ... –  neuro Jan 27 '11 at 15:04
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According to the doc :

bool t.release_memory()

t must be ordered. Frees every memory block that doesn't have any allocated chunks. Returns true if at least one memory block was freed.

bool t.purge_memory()

Frees every memory block. This function invalidates any pointers previously returned by allocation functions of t. Returns true if at least one memory block was freed.

So to have your memory released, you need to use purge_memory(). You can do that only if every pointer you have got through the pool is no more used !

If release_memory returns true, it seems that your memory is still in use ...

my2c

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thanks, relase_memory returns true when atleast one memory block is freed. it always returns false in my case even though I have ensured that I have called free for each ordered_malloc. –  user544550 Jan 27 '11 at 13:51
    
@user: well my best guess is that you need to use purge_memory ... i'm on linux, so I can not do tests ... –  neuro Jan 27 '11 at 14:59
    
The boost::pool documentation, so far as I can see, in the current version 1.5.5, at least, says absolutely nothing about the difference between release_memory and purge_memory. I am grateful to have come across this posting. –  Dan Nissenbaum Apr 8 at 14:01
    
@Dan: well that's 1.45.0 version at the time of the post. They might have changed the behavior ... Check the code ! –  neuro Apr 8 at 15:42
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This is how boost::pool works and this is why your allocations are so fast. When you de-allocate an object, you're not really de-allocating anything. boost::pool is basically saying that area of memory is available for another object of that size. So no, you won't see your memory-usage go down when you free objects, because that's how object-pooling works. You have a chunk of pre-allocated memory, and you use that chunk of memory to create your objects. A "pool of objects", as it were :)

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Thanks this confirms my assumptions. Is there a way to destroy this pool of objects and start again? –  user544550 Jan 27 '11 at 13:45
    
or a way to find out how may chunks are present? –  user544550 Jan 27 '11 at 13:46
    
@user544550, as neuro points out below, purge_memory gets rid of it, but as he states, any object that is allocate is now garbage. –  Moo-Juice Jan 27 '11 at 13:51
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