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I am trying to build a temperature converter to help myself learn C#. I only know most of the basics, and this is what I have come up with so far. What I am stuck on, is taking the number the user puts in, and converting it to the choice that the user previously entered, being farenheit or celsius. Again, I only know the basics, but help would very appreciated.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("What sort of temperature would you like to convert?");
            string tempType = Console.ReadLine();
            ConvertChoice(tempType.ToLower());
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter a temperature to convert: ");
            string temperatureString = Console.ReadLine();
            int temperature = int.Parse(temperatureString);
            Console.ReadLine();   
        }

        static void ConvertChoice(string tempType)
        {
            switch (tempType)
            {
                case "farenheit":
                    Console.WriteLine("Farenheit it is!");
                    return;
                case "celsius":
                    Console.WriteLine("Celsius it is!");
                    return;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid type, please type farenheit or celsius.");
                    return;
            }
        }
    }
}
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migrated from programmers.stackexchange.com Jan 27 '11 at 13:07

This question came from our site for professional programmers interested in conceptual questions about software development.

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5 Answers

Assuming you enter something like "Celsius, 20" meaning you want to convert 20ºC to Fahrenheit, you need some logic like this

if type == fahrenheit
    result = [formula from fahrenheit to celsius, using 'temperature']
    restype = "celsius"
else
    result = [formula from celsius to fahrenheit, using 'temperature']
    restype = "fahrenheit"

print "The result is", result, "degrees", restype

Not sure if this answers your question, though.

A fancier way would be to support Kelvin as well. Convert the input temperature to Kelvin from whatever the user enters, and then convert Kelvin to whatever the user wants. Then you can support converting to/from any kind of units without having to handle each case individually:

any unit -> kelvin -> any other unit

If you don't see the advantage, imagine how would you code this for 5 or 10 different units instead of just 2.

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How bout this?

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    // Using an enum to store the result of 
    // parsing user input is good practice.
    public enum Scale
    {
      Unknown,
      Celsius,
      Farenheit
    }


    class Program
    {

        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("What sort of temperature would you like to convert?");
            string tempType = Console.ReadLine();

            switch(ConvertChoice(tempType))
            {
              case Scale.Celsius:
                // do celsius work here
              break;
              case Scale Farenheit:
                // do farenheit work here
              break;
              default:
                // invalid input work here  
            }
            Console.ReadLine();   
        }

        static Scale ConvertChoice(string tempType)
        {
          // use the framework.  also, when dealing with string equality, its best
          // to use an overload that uses the StringComparison enum.
          if(tempType.StartsWith("f", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
            return Scale.Farenheit;
          if(tempType.StartsWith("c", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)))
            return Scale.Celsius;
          return Scale.Unknown;
        }
    }

}

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Using an object approach.... Forgive some likely syntax / style errors,normally don't use c# myself...

class TempConverter 
{
  public string degreeType {get; set;}
  public double userTemp {get; set;}

  public TempConverter(){}

  public double convert()
  { 
    switch(this.degreeType)
    {
       case "F":
          return this.convertToF();
       case "C":
          return this.convertToC();
       default:
          return null;  
    }

  }
  public double convertToF()
  {
       return //user temp converted to F
  }

  public double convertToC()
  {
       return //user temp converted to C
  }
}

Then your main class would look something like:

class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        TempConverter converter = new TempConverter();
            Console.WriteLine("What sort of temperature would you like to convert?");
            converter.degreeType = Console.ReadLine();
            ConvertChoice(converter.degreeType);
            Console.WriteLine("Please enter a temperature to convert: ");
            converter.userTemp = Convert.ToDouble(Console.ReadLine());
            Console.WriteLine(Double.ToString(converter.convert());  
        }

        static void ConvertChoice(string tempType)
        {
            switch (tempType)
            {
                case "farenheit":
                    Console.WriteLine("Farenheit it is!");
                    return;
                case "celsius":
                    Console.WriteLine("Celsius it is!");
                    return;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid type, please type farenheit or celsius.");
                    return;
            }
        }
    }
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Your program has a few shortcomings; first of all you need to save which type of conversion the user wants to perform, so that you can actually perform it when he/she has entered the temperature that needs to be converted. Since you are only operating with two temperature types (Fahrenheit and Celsius (yeah, well, who uses Réaumur anyway?)) you can store the user choice as a boolean that indicates whether or not Fahrenheit was chosen. You might also want to accept decimal numbers.

So, having said that, here's how you could alter your program to reflect my suggestions:

namespace ConsoleApplication1
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            bool isFahrenheit;
            bool temperatureTypeHasBeenDetermined = false;
            while(!temperatureTypeHasBeenDetermined){
                Console.WriteLine("What sort of temperature would you like to convert?");
                string tempType = Console.ReadLine();
                temperatureTypeHasBeenDetermined = ConvertChoice(tempType.ToLower(), out isFahrenheit);
            }
            decimal temperature;
            bool temperatureEnteredCorrectly = false;
            while(!temperatureEnteredCorrectly){
                Console.WriteLine("Please enter a temperature to convert: ");
                string temperatureString = Console.ReadLine();
                temperatureEnteredCorrectly = decimal.TryParse(temperatureString, out temperature);
            }
            //Now we are ready to do the conversion
            decimal convertedTemperature = isFahrenheit ?
                                           ConvertFromFahrenheitToCelsius(temperature) :
                                           ConvertFromCelsiusToFahrenheit(temperature);
            string from = isFahrenheit ? "F" : "C";
            string to = isFahrenheit ? "C" : "F";

            Console.WriteLine("{0}{1} = {2}{3}", temperature, from, convertedTemperature, to);                

            Console.ReadLine();   
        }

        static decimal ConvertFromFahrenheitToCelsius(decimal temperature)
        {
             //Implement properly
             return 60m;
        }

        static decimal ConvertFromCelsiusToFahrenheit(decimal temperature)
        {
             //Implement properly
             return 42m;
        }

        static bool ConvertChoice(string tempType, out bool isFahrenheit)
        {
            isFahrenheit = false;
            switch (tempType)
            {
                case "fahrenheit":
                    Console.WriteLine("Fahrenheit it is!");
                    isFahrenheit = true;
                    return true;
                case "celsius":
                    Console.WriteLine("Celsius it is!");
                    return false;
                default:
                    Console.WriteLine("Invalid type, please type fahrenheit or celsius.");
                    return false;
            }
        }
    }
}

Note that I have made sure that correct values are entered for both temperature type and temperature value by looping until a valid value is obtained.

I hope this guides you in the right direction for further self-learning. Please don't hesitate to ask if you have any questions regarding the above. As a disclaimer I must say that I have not compiled the above code, but my mental syntax checker is usually pretty reliable ;-)

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You've got their choice stored in tempType. Use that.

static double GetTemp(string tempChoice, int temperature)
{
   double convertedTemp = 0.0;

   if(tempChoice.Equals("farenheit", StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
   {
       convertedTemp = ((double)temperature * 9.0/5.0) + 32.0;
   }
   else
   {
       convertedTemp = ((double)temperature -32.0) * 5.0/9.0;
   }

   return convertedTemp;
}

Just call this function from your main().

(Note: Yes, I realize that this is limited in its functionality and assumes that there are only two possible temperature scales. The OP said he was learning programming, so I went with the simplest example possible).

EDIT Fixed my algorithm. Now the logic actually works as intended.

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