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Does anyone have experience using Python in different variaty of applications?

A little background - I am a 3D artist in an animation studio. I do programming in PHP and use Zend framework for my personal project. Python has always been a language I wanted to learn because it can be used within many applications our studio is using (3D MAX, MAYA to name a few) My supervisor knew about my web background and wanted me to create a web base time line manager for the company. From the requirement I'm expecting quite a simple backend ... so it might be a good opportunity to finally learn Python. The bulk of the work will be on AJAX for the interactive front end.

So if I learn Python with web application and Django in mind, will that limit my Python skill from applying it to other applications?

a little curious about Django features as well. How well does the framework cover in terms of web application compare to Zend? Our application is pretty basic in the back end and I would love to know if Django will be able to cover them.

  • authenticate against Windows active directory
  • quick database update via AJAX interaction (drag and drop time line mostly)
  • Other basic stuff like discussion forum and directory browsing/file manager
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Id suggest pulling out your last paragraph and posting it as a separate question –  richzilla Jan 27 '11 at 13:18
    
Good suggestion –  Filip Dupanović Jan 27 '11 at 14:43
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3 Answers 3

So if I learn Python with web application and Django in mind, will that limit my Python skill from applying it to other applications?

No

authenticate against Windows active directory

Yes. You may need to customize an Authentication Backend.

quick database update via AJAX interaction (drag and drop time line mostly)

Django has nothing to do with Ajax. Use piston to create pleasant RESTful API that Ajax can use.

Other basic stuff like discussion forum and directory browsing/file manager

There are many, many canned applications for Django that you can plug in and integrate.

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Not true that Django has nothing to do with Ajax. Django views can respond to Ajax requests in the same way as normal HTTP requests, and return text fragments, XML, JSON, etc as well as HTML. –  thepeer Jan 27 '11 at 15:00
    
@thepeer: Ajax is just a script buried in the templates. –  S.Lott Jan 27 '11 at 15:09
    
Eh? Your Django application still needs to respond to ajax requests. –  thepeer Feb 11 '11 at 12:45
    
@thepeer: Responding to Ajax is the same as responding to FLEX or responding to RESTful requests written in Java, C++ or Erlang. It's just a RESTful HTTP request. Nothing special about Ajax at all. –  S.Lott Feb 11 '11 at 13:00
    
I see where you're coming from, and you're right, but it's unhelpful to someone totally new to the framework to say "Django has nothing to do with Ajax". Some frameworks provide drop-in widgets which handle front- and back-end code. To me this is an abomination, but your initial comment made it sound like Django can't "do" AJAX at all, when in fact, as a proper web framework that respects HTTP rather than treating it like an unruly creature that has to be tamed, Django is agnostic about the source of the request. –  thepeer Feb 13 '11 at 11:09
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I love python as a language - but it's not the answer to everything. I know this is throwing mud in a python group, but python has one serious limitation - the rigid source code format.

While going through a django tutorial - I noticed that you cannot insert python source code into a template, and that this was presented as a 'feature' for separating programmers and designers.

I later realized that it's a limitation of django - and any other environment where python source code might get accidentally mangled. This also includes HTML WYSIWIG editors and database based 'manglers' (like Drupal).

In my opinion it's a very serious limitation with no easy cure - especially with the need to use other tools to manage the complexity of HTML / CSS / JavaScript.

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it's a design restriction to make template rendering an idempotent operation. This isn't a limitation, it's to protect you from the evils of doing things in templates that have nothing to do with presentation, such as exposing behavior (views) or business logic (models). Didn't you ever get tipped off by people doing database calls in the presentation layer in PHP frameworks? –  Filip Dupanović Jan 27 '11 at 17:47
    
Sounds like you haven't quite bought into MVC. Fight the urge to execute arbitrary code in templates. I had the same feeling initially, but it's not necessary(or usually good). –  Kekoa Jan 31 '11 at 18:51
    
Separating template from view has some serious strengths as well. If you don't like it, you can use a different template language. –  Yuji 'Tomita' Tomita Feb 11 '11 at 12:46
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I found Django a really good way to learn python. There's very little that's quirky, magical or un-pythonic in the framework. A bit of setup and you're away, writing standard python code.

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