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I have a worker thread that gets work from pipe. Something like this

void *worker(void *param) {
  while (!work_done) {
    read(g_workfds[0], work, sizeof(work));
    do_work(work);
  }
}

I need to implement a 1 second timer in the same thread do to some book-keeping about the work. Following is what I've in mind:

void *worker(void *param) {
  prev_uptime = get_uptime();
  while (!work_done) {
    // set g_workfds[0] as non-block
    now_uptime = get_uptime();
    if (now_uptime - prev_uptime > 1) {
       do_book_keeping();
       prev_uptime = now_uptime;
    }
    n = poll(g_workfds[0], 1000); // Wait for 1 second else timeout
    if (n == 0) // timed out 
       continue;
    read(g_workfds[0], work, sizeof(work));
    do_work(work);   // This can take more than 1 second also
  }
}

I am using system uptime instead of system time because system time can get changed while this thread is running. I was wondering if there is any other better way to do this. I don't want to consider using another thread. Using alarm() is not an option as it already used by another thread in same process. This is getting implemented in Linux environment.

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select() instead of poll()? –  CoreyStup Jan 27 '11 at 13:46
    
He he.. Its effectively the same thing. –  Manish Jan 27 '11 at 13:48
1  
In fact, it's not the same, select() has a fixed number of sockets that will read (1024) while poll() doesn't. –  webbi Jan 27 '11 at 14:27

3 Answers 3

I agree with most of what webbi wrote in his answer. But there is one issue with his suggestion of using time instead of uptime. If the system time is updated "forward" it will work as intended. But if the system time is set back by say 30 seconds, then there will be no book keeping done for 30 seconds as (now_time - prev_time) will be negative (unless an unsigned type is used, in which case it will work anyway).

An alternative would be to use clock_gettime() with CLOCK_MONOTONIC as clockid ( http://linux.die.net/man/2/clock_gettime ). A bit messy if you don't need smaller time units than seconds.

Also, adding code to detect a backwards clock jump isn't hard either.

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If you don't need time units less than seconds just only use the tv_sec field :) –  bdonlan Jan 27 '11 at 16:32
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have found a better way but it is Linux specific using timerfd_create() system call. It takes care of system time change. Following is possible psuedo code:

void *worker(void *param) {
  int timerfd = timerfd_create(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, 0);  // Monotonic doesn't get affected by system time change
  // set timerfd to non-block 
  timerfd_settime(timerfd, 1 second timer);     // timer starts 
  while (!work_done) {
    // set g_workfds[0] as non-block
    n = poll(g_workfds[0] and timerfd, 0); // poll on both pipe and timerfd and Wait indefinetly 
    if (timerfd is readable) 
       do_book_keeping();
    if (g_workfds[0] is readable) {
       read(g_workfds[0], work, sizeof(work));
       do_work(work);   // This can take more than 1 second also
    }
  }
}

It seems cleaner and read() on timerfd returns extra time elapsed in case do_work() takes long time which is quite useful as do_book_keeping() expects to get called every second.

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This is a fine solution, though be aware that timerfd is a relatively recent addition to Linux. –  caf Jan 27 '11 at 23:58

I found some things weird in your code...

poll() has 3 args, you are passing 2, the second arg is the number of structs that you are passing in the struct array of first param, the third param is the timeout.

Reference: http://linux.die.net/man/2/poll

Besides that, it's fine for me that workaround, it's not the best of course, but it's fine without involving another thread or alarm(), etc. You use time and not uptime, it could cause you one error if the system date gets changed, but then it will continue working as it will be updated and continuing waiting for 1 sec, no matter what time is.

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I understand about poll() arguments. It was mainly a psuedo code. I was going to write a comment next to poll() to forgive me for using less arguments :). I guess you are right about using time. Getting uptime involves extra overhead of reading /proc/uptime and parsing it. –  Manish Jan 27 '11 at 14:48

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