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We need to verify that download links work. And because the files are quite large, we need to verify that we don't have outdated, useless files sitting in our download directory. So we have a download management page that validates that every database file_name has a file named the same in the download directory. The page then verifies that every file in our directory has a file_name in our database.

in the controller:

@documents = Document.find(:all, :order => "section asc, sub_section asc, position asc, name asc")
@files = Dir.glob("public/downloads/*").sort

FIRST VALIDATION: in my view to validate that there is a file for every document record in the database:

<% @documents.each do |d| -%>
    <% if @files.include?("public/downloads/" + d.file_name)
       clr = "Green"
    else
       clr = "Red"
    end %>

    ... color coded print routine ...
<% end %>

SECOND VALIDATION: in my view to validate that every file has a document record in the datebase:

<% @files.each do |f| -%>
    <% str = f.gsub(/^.*\//, '')
    if @documents.include?(str)
        clr = "Green"
    else
        clr = "Red"
    end %>

    ... color coded print routine ...
<% end %>

with my small test document list, the printed database file_names match exactly with the file names printed from our download directory. however, the include test for the second validation is not working. i haven't been able to figure out why.

thanks!

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This code:

if @documents.include?(str)

should look like this:

if @documents.detect{|doc| doc.file_name == str}
share|improve this answer
    
worked perfectly :=] thanks. – Jay Jan 27 '11 at 14:44
    
I believe that detect is not the correct general way to do this - it works in this case because you know that no string is empty, since detect will return the found element. I believe either .map().include() or .any() should be used instead – Arne Bergene Fossaa Jan 27 '11 at 14:47
    
Actually detect will always return a document instance, so there is no chance of that happening. In this case the only difference is that any? returns a boolean and detect returns a Document instance or nil. – psyho Jan 27 '11 at 15:12
    
In this case, yes, but in general, it is better to use any? - since you rely on what is detected to not return nil or false. For example - if ["a", nil].detect { |x| x == nil } will not return as expected. There excists more subtle examples, I am sure :) – Arne Bergene Fossaa Jan 27 '11 at 21:13

Instead of @documents.include?(str) use @documents.any? { |d| d.file_name == str}

share|improve this answer

The problem is that @documents is not a collection of file_names, it is a collection of Document instances. You should try something like this instead:

@documents.map(&:file_name).include?(str)

This will collect all file_names and then check if str matches any of them.

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