Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm reading Paul Graham's A Plan for Spam and want to understand it better but my LISP is really rusty. He has a snippet of code that calculates probability as such:

(let ((g (* 2 (or (gethash word good) 0)))
      (b (or (gethash word bad) 0)))
   (unless (< (+ g b) 5)
     (max .01
          (min .99 (float (/ (min 1 (/ b nbad))
                             (+ (min 1 (/ g ngood))   
                                (min 1 (/ b nbad)))))))))

My question is twofold: (1) is there a web resource that will convert LISP to a different language? (my preference would be a C based language) or failing that (2) can someone rewrite that code snippet in C# for me?

share|improve this question
    
Edit this to indicate what you've tried and what you don't understand. Right now it's just a plzsendtehcodez question that won't bring in any answers. – Cody Brocious Jan 26 '09 at 23:25
    
lol. I don't think C# is a C-based language :) – cbrulak Jan 26 '09 at 23:26
    
C# is MUCH closer to C then Lisp in many many ways. I would call C# a C based language myself. – nlaq Jan 26 '09 at 23:27
    
that may be, but still... it is not really a C based language, it is more of a Java based langauge with syntax to look like C – cbrulak Jan 26 '09 at 23:35
3  
Does... it.... really... matter...? – Inisheer Jan 26 '09 at 23:47
up vote 9 down vote accepted

I think it's something like this (warning, possible errors ahead. This snippet is intended as a guide, not a solution):

var g = 2 * (gethash(word, good) | 0);
var b = gethash(word, bad) | 0;

if( (g + b) >= 5)
{
    return Math.Max( 
    	0.01, 
    	Math.Min(0.99, 
    		Math.Min(1, b / nbad) / 
    		(Math.Min(1, g / ngood) + Math.Min(1, b / nbad))));
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Gonzalo - much appreciated. – Guy Jan 27 '09 at 4:47
    
The if condition is off by one: ((g+b) > 4) or ((g+b) >= 5) is correct. According to PG, 5 is just an arbitrary threshold, so it isn't that important. – Nathan Shively-Sanders Jan 27 '09 at 16:29
    
@Nathan You're right. Corrected. – Gonzalo Quero Jan 28 '09 at 12:17
1  
BUG: the original code uses infinite precision, so if 'b' and 'nbad' are integers, '(/ b nbad)' in lisp will yield an exact result, but 'b / nbad' in C# will not.. it will truncate. you need to cast one or the other to float first in C#. – Aaron Jan 28 '09 at 18:18
1  
What's the point in using var here? It makes the code look like JavaScript – Waleed Eissa Apr 4 '09 at 5:25

Adding on to Gonzola's answer, don't forget that Lisp provides infinite precision integers and rationals, while C# likes to truncate. You'll need to cast 'nbad' and 'ngood' to float first to get comparable (though not identical) results.

You may also want to put the whole converted program in a checked region. C# doesn't even warn on fixnum overflow -- the first approximation would be to treat overflow as if you're memory constrained (in Lisp, if overflow yeilds too big a number to fit in remaining memory, similar behavior results).

checked {
    var fbad = (double)nbad;
    var fgood = (double)ngood;
    var g = 2 * (gethash(word, good) | 0);
    var b = gethash(word, bad) | 0;


    if( (g + b) >= 5)
    {
        return Math.Max( 
            0.01, 
            Math.Min(0.99, 
                    Math.Min(1, b / fbad) / 
                    (Math.Min(1, g / fgood) + Math.Min(1, b / fbad))));
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.